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Massive volcano wiped out Neanderthals

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  • #16
    Originally posted by periquin View Post
    About the comment that Homo Neanderthal Sapiens possibly had less efficient locomotion than Home Sapiens Sapiens-------Recent genetic mapping that discovered probable Neanderthal genes in our current gene pools led to other research that shows that the more Neanderthal genes a person has the greater is their talent for music, dance, and gymnastics. Seems to imply an ability to move more efficiently and with more grace and style.
    HA!

    I never got ANY then
    Scottish Sarah

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    • #17
      Originally posted by periquin View Post
      About the comment that Homo Neanderthal Sapiens possibly had less efficient locomotion than Home Sapiens Sapiens-------Recent genetic mapping that discovered probable Neanderthal genes in our current gene pools led to other research that shows that the more Neanderthal genes a person has the greater is their talent for music, dance, and gymnastics. Seems to imply an ability to move more efficiently and with more grace and style.
      I hadn't heard this, and I'm honestly a little skeptical that these genes (which I believe were identified only earlier this year) have been mapped onto modern populations and correlated with traits like musical ability. That said, it's certainly not impossible. When I spoke of "efficiency", I meant the narrow sense of caloric expenditure - the human bipedal gait is not very fast compared to quadrupeds, and we're more at risk of tripping and hurting ourselves, but it requires very little energy to walk (not run) long distances. Chimps and bonobos can and do walk upright for short distances, but their different joints, limbs and muscles mean they burn far more energy to cover the same distance compared to humans. So I don't think it implies that neanderthals would have been less graceful or more clumsy, just that they'd have to burn (and thus consume) more calories to get around. Depending on your environment, this could be an important factor.

      Of course I don't remember where I read that, and I don't insist that it's true, just wanted to clear up the bit about efficiency.

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      • #18
        A quip from national geographic channel mentioned that the sheer amount of calories required for a neanderthal for day to day activities could have been extremely detrimental to them. Ice cold temps, extreme physicality in hunting, etc. etc. Their estimate was around 7,000-10,000 or some retarded Tour De France number like that.
        So if food gets a little bit scarce, what happens? Skinny emo neanderthals who listen to bad music and just don't see the point anymore.
        The more I learn about our evolution, the more it becomes clear to me that the ONLY reason we are still here is because
        1. We are good at ****ing
        2. We are good at getting fat.

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        • #19
          The volcanic activity would have changed the climate, and helped decimate the large game animals upon which the Neaderthal lived. Their caloric needs were likely not met on the smaller game animals that remained, unlike our own ancestors, who had lived off these things, as well as game from the sea.

          As to those who traded with the Han Chinese, those would have been the Tocharians, circa 2400-1800 BCE. They were an 'Indo-European' speaking people who likely traveled from the areas of northern Europe and were thereby related to those who became the Norse, as well as the Celtic and Germanic peoples. They were tall and fair skinned, with several of the men being upwards of 6 feet in height. But then...they were meat eaters.

          The neaderthal genes we carry are from a much earlier time. Nearly 40,000 years ago. That they can be found in all populations except Africa indicates that the gene sharing occurred in the Middle East, before modern humans spread out.
          Start weight: 250 - 06/2009
          Current weight: 199
          Goal: 145

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