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  • AMAZING Grow Your Own Food

    I want to show everyone the MOST AMAZING home garden. In a very small space, these people grow more than 100% of their own food. Put your front or back yard to work! Don't waste it with grass.

    Growing Your Greens.Com teaches us everything we need to know via all of these videos!
    He uses "Square Foot Gardening" principles on a massive scale.
    http://www.youtube.com/user/growingy...83/3LT68yYXirE

    http://www.youtube.com/user/growingy...79/amOlhsPrmIA

    Square Foot Gardening Principles:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N5Lu-7FIj_g

    Best of health to all,
    Grizz

  • #2
    Hi, Grizz!

    One of my very favorite topics, getting fertile loose soil into my yard, which had the worst case of "construction pan" I'd ever seen when I moved in. Raised beds, permaculture, lots of fun unusual small fruits and greens and medicinals. It gradually comes right. The cornelian cherries (yellow ones) were really good this year. The blue muscat grapes are just coming right. Almost time to harvest the medlars. I bought another goumi (sets nitrogen) to go with the four year old one, but still have to raise a bed to plant it in. Best success: got a bundle of nearly dead walla walla sweet onion starts, they recovered wonderfully, and the tiniest ones got bigger and were good the following year.

    Yes, grow! And why not? Also, I'm trying to close the circles, so to speak, and use hardly anything which is imported from far away. Less and less "house beautiful" industrialized gardening. I've been stuck, buying six packs and half gallon pots of stock, but I think I'm almost ready to go to growing my own. I suddenly realized that the only really sunny window in my house, the south-facing one in my bedroom, could have a shelf mounted just below it, and I could put the sprouted seeds there. Even old styrofoam cups work well for pots. Also I love saving seeds and minor breeding experiments. For instance, I took grape tomatoes from the coop (organic) which no doubt were hybrids, and saved seed from them. I got a variety of plants the three years I've tried some of that seed, but the first year was the best: very long internodal distance between leaves, crawled around the deck, but the tomatoes were long pears instead of grapes, in trusses of about twelve, and wonderfully sweet, with tender skins. Wish I'd saved from them, as well.

    Just wondering if I should start a worm farm, instead of burying the kitchen scraps. Would be easier in the winter, and I could get worm castings and liquid fertilizer, plus get rid of odds and ends like old newspaper, fiber egg cartons, paper coffee filters and grounds, and so forth.

    My favorite garden book: "Gaia's Garden" by Toby Hemenway. He makes building soil and developing a "self-watering" yard (swales and berms and water catchment) seem not only possible but great fun.

    Fall garden is waiting for me, got some more plants yesterday (always a little late.) Sylvetta wild arugula, a six pack of ordinary arugula (I hope they crossbreed and start volunteering, plus I'll save their seed.) Brussels sprouts. Butterfly plant (asclepias tuberosa, a form of milk weed), chives, a big echinacea plant, and three big plants of plain leaf Italian parsley. Red Russian kale already in. Should have got snow peas in about a month ago, now I'll have to wait till early spring. Last summer's tomatoes (heirloom cherry tomatoes, sort of a brownish red + green color, but very sweet with good flavor) are still coming on well. Bought some camas bulbs just for fun. The Oregon Indians used to eat a lot of that.

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    • #3
      P.S. If your greens are growing in the yard, they never even need to see the inside of the fridge! Always totally fresh, they just hang around awaiting your interest.

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      • #4
        Thanks for the links. I grow some stuff, but I know I'm wasting lots of space. Part of the problem is that we rent. We've been living here five years now, but we never know when the owner is going to pull the rug out from under us and sell the place, so we don't really want to spend too much time and effort amending the soil and starting long-range projects.

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        • #5
          How about growing in big containers, dragonmama? And then if you move you just take them along? In the meantime, you get fresh food and gardening experience.

          Actually, I rented one place after another till I was 57, when I was finally able to by my house (with the subsoil chemicalized yard with membrane under weeds.) I've planted baby trees in one place after another, just because it's fun, and not expensive if you buy little tiny ones, which catch up with what the big ones would be pretty quickly.

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          • #6
            I've got some half-barrel containers at the side of the house, as well as a decent-sized garden area that we add compost to yearly. But it would be a real pain in the butt to move those barrels without taking the soil out.

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            • #7
              I'm super excited for next year; our planting season is pretty much over now. I LOVE the idea of growing small melons on a trellis and have been wanting to do this for years (we've moved around a bit, so I've never had the chance to build up the soil in one place). I'm hoping to add one raised bed for melons, peppers, and tomatoes as well. I'd also like to add hoses for an automatic watering system.
              my primal journal:
              http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...Primal-Journal

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              • #8
                I hear your frustration, Saoirse. So many years wanting my own real garden, which I would be allowed to keep, but then I had to move instead.

                Enjoy your project next spring!

                I had a full-blow drip irrigation system one place, and it was sort of a pain. What I like are soaker hoses (made from recycled tires) with instant-release hardware so that one can plug the hose into them easily. Then turn to just a dribble, go away for an hour or two, and all along the hose (which can be covered with mulch) you'll end up with deep, deep watering, enough to last maybe a week, and no waste.

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                • #9
                  I've got my gardens going. Just put in some early tomatos, beetroot and zuccini. Have bok chow and spinach germinating for smmer. My brocoli is going nuts and we cant eat it fast enough. Also had some cauli's and kale over winter.

                  Also got a worm farm and compost heap so all kitchen scraps get recycled-much better than throwing it away.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by piano-doctor-lady View Post
                    I hear your frustration, Saoirse. So many years wanting my own real garden, which I would be allowed to keep, but then I had to move instead.

                    Enjoy your project next spring!

                    I had a full-blow drip irrigation system one place, and it was sort of a pain. What I like are soaker hoses (made from recycled tires) with instant-release hardware so that one can plug the hose into them easily. Then turn to just a dribble, go away for an hour or two, and all along the hose (which can be covered with mulch) you'll end up with deep, deep watering, enough to last maybe a week, and no waste.
                    I probably mispoke, this is what I was thinking of. I've heard of installing a timer, but I don't really see the point in that unless I'm out of town (and even then, I'd want a neighbor to come check on it).

                    One year, I had a beautiful garden full of tomato plants (heirloom and cherry), Charentais melons, red bell peppers, carrots, cukes. The plants were all 100% bug free, dark green, and growing their various fruits when my husband got a job offer in another state (he had just finished college and we couldn't refuse) just a few short weeks before they would have been ripe enough!!
                    my primal journal:
                    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...Primal-Journal

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                    • #11
                      John form growing your greens is a great resource on YouTube. As an apartment dweller, I focus on my aquaponics to provide supplemental leafy greens.

                      Piano lady, definitely go for the worm farm, they are so much easier!

                      +10000 for all those growing their own food whether it be square foot, raised beds, permaculture or whatever.
                      http://www.theprimalprepper.com - preparing for life's worst while living for the best

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                      • #12
                        Wow, he's really going for it! I made a couple of square yard (9*square foot) gardens for our kids this year, and I couldn't believe the amount of produce we got compared to my usual space-it-out approach. All the beds are going to get square-footed next year.
                        My primal journal
                        You might find these handy: Free gluten free restaurant cards in 50+ languages
                        In Praise of the Primal Lifestyle

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by racingsnake View Post
                          Wow, he's really going for it! I made a couple of square yard (9*square foot) gardens for our kids this year, and I couldn't believe the amount of produce we got compared to my usual space-it-out approach. All the beds are going to get square-footed next year.
                          Awesome, glad to hear of your success. We tried one small 4 x 6 and didn't do too bad but not as well as you mentioned. Post pics if you have some. Our family wants to add more space next year too. My problem is my 3 acres is blueberry land, rocky, ledge, not a flat space anywhere.
                          You'll never see the light if you're in someone else's shadow, or said another way, life is like a dog sled team, if you're not the lead dog, the scenery never changes

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