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What Our Fingernails Say About Us

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  • #16
    I had really bad vertical lines. They are improving and nails are so hard now. Hazyjane, I had the hollow cheeks too- they have filled out, it's weird because I keep touching my face as there's such a difference.My sunken eyes have filled in too. Gosh, I was a mess from fruitarianism.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by hazyjane View Post
      Adrenal fatigue (to which there are varying degrees of- Addison's being an extreme) is so common these days. Our modern lifestyle is so bad for our poor adrenals! We have chronic low grade stress, stay up too late/don't get adequate sleep, drink caffeine/stimulants, etc. all of which can wear on our adrenals over time.

      I recommend doing a bit of reading about adrenal fatigue- there are tons of articles out there. Primal is an excellent diet to help the adrenals.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jt6OO...eature=related
      http://www.adrenalfatigue.org/
      Thanks Jane. I work long hours, sometimes until 2-3am. I don't get enough sleep a lot of the time and drink too much coffee. Maybe it's time to start slowing down.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by StoneAgeQueen View Post
        Thanks Jane. I work long hours, sometimes until 2-3am. I don't get enough sleep a lot of the time and drink too much coffee. Maybe it's time to start slowing down.
        Yeah- that'll do it to your adrenals, LOL!
        Seriously, though- you don't want to end up on the brink of chronic fatigue with bottomed-out hormone levels like I did. Adrenal fatigue will really mess up your sex hormone production!
        http://www.prettyinprimal.blogspot.com

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Hilary View Post
          FWIW and AFAIK, the 'white spots = zinc deficiency' thing is a myth. I've always had these, so I've hunted around in the past for some authoritative information on the cause, without finding anything. 'Trauma' and 'inherited tendency' are about as far as it goes.

          http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9686635

          Adv Ren Replace Ther. 1998 Jul;5(3):241-51.
          Trophic implications of altered body composition observed in or near the nails of hemodialysis patients.

          Kelly MP, Kight MA, Castillo S.
          University of California Renal Center, San Francisco 94110, USA.
          Abstract

          In the absence of biochemically determined nutrient status, renal nutrition specialists have been left to assume that hemodialysis (HD) patients with a stable body weight and acceptable macronutrient intakes had adequate micronutrient stores. However, at the University of California Renal Center, using physical examination and laboratory studies, approximately one in three HD patients were found to have micronutrient imbalance. The Nutrition Physical Examination (NPE), an advanced practice, nutrition-focused, physical examination, can be a timely, cost-effective strategy in assessing nutrient status. Trophic changes that have been identified in and around the nails of HD patients suggestive of protein, vitamin, or mineral imbalance include (1) Beau's lines (zinc); (2) koilonychia (iron, copper, zinc, protein); (3) leukonychia (zinc); (4) pale nail beds (iron); (5) Muehrcke's lines (protein); (6) splinter hemorrhages (V-C); (7) onycholysis (iron, niacin); and (8) chronic paronychia (zinc). While these lesions are not pathognomonic of nutrient deficiency, they do provide valuable direction in diagnostic reasoning essential to problem-solving potential maladaptive alterations in the stimulus and function of micronutrients and their enzyme systems.

          PMID: 9686635 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]



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          • #20
            While these lesions are not pathognomonic of nutrient deficiency, they do provide valuable direction in diagnostic reasoning essential to problem-solving potential maladaptive alterations in the stimulus and function of micronutrients and their enzyme systems.
            I think that would translate to 'this doesn't give you a definitive diagnosis of deficiency, but it means it's worth looking into.'

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Hilary View Post
              I think that would translate to 'this doesn't give you a definitive diagnosis of deficiency, but it means it's worth looking into.'
              Exactly. Since we know it can also just be caused by trauma, that's a possibility as well.



              iherb referral code CIL457- $5 off first order

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