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Does insulin spike with sugar substitutes?

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  • Does insulin spike with sugar substitutes?

    I have been trying to find an answer to this question. I found some info on increased insulin in the cephalic phase insulin response... anyone found a good clear research article?

  • #2
    I haven't looked at the research either, but diet cherry doctor pepper used to give me a sugar crash about two hours after drinking it. 0 calories. Several times over several years with different other meals. I don't know what the heck they put in that stuff.

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    • #3
      Yes, I think this is one: http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/30/7/e59.full

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      • #4
        Good article which indicates an increase of insulin does occur with aspartame. So, help me think this through. Is this a bad thing because insulin will cause an increase in appetite to combat hypoglycemia AND contribute to insulin resistance. Or is this a good thing because it may ? force the body to convert fat to fatty acids to be used for energy? This is confusing

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        • #5
          Artificial sweeteners (esp aspartame) make me ravenous soon after I eat them, so I gave them up a long time ago.

          I'm not a chemist, but my guess would be along the lines of the "bad thing."

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          • #6
            It is bad because eating aspartame (like a diet coke) prepares your body for sugar as it seems sweet to the brain. Then you don't have a calorie hit, so you crave chocolate cake and overeat. There was another study (don't have a link, but you can google aspartame or nutrasweet and appetite stimulant) that found participants who drank regular coke modulated their eating because the regular coke made them a bit full, those that had diet coke ate a lot.

            There was another study I read while sitting in the dentist waiting room that certain cells in the stomach are stimulated which causes cravings, the effect came from sugars of all kinds, artificial sweeteners and some kinds of preserved foods like smoked sausage and hard cheese.

            Finally, you want to give up artificial sweeteners to acclimate your taste buds to less sweetness. After a period of time, you'll notice vegetables taste a bit sweet; ripe fruit is heavenly and conventional desserts are sickening.

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            • #7
              Makes sense. This is one of the biggest differences with PB and "low carb eating" which encourages all kinds of substitutions and cheats. For me it is about making changes as I discover the need. I have eliminated soda a long time ago but still have the sugar free vanilla to use in my tea once in a while. This will be the next to go. Thanks!!

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              • #8
                No, I've never found any convincing evidence..... you basically need calories as well as a sweet taste to increase insulin. The study above are meals consisting of 300 to 400 calories.....who knows what effects aspartame had when included with food..........
                Whether you think you can..... or you think you can't..... your 100 % correct.

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                • #9
                  I was informed that anything that tasted sweet will cause an insulin release.

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                  • #10
                    This review shows that they don't.
                    Sweet-taste receptors, low-energy sweeteners, glucose absorption and insulin release

                    Still not a good idea to have them though!
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                    • #11
                      http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...29f534fe4a77e6

                      These results suggest that nutritive and nonnutritive sweeteners in solution are not adequate stimuli for the elicitation of CPIR.
                      CPIR: cephalic phase insulin release
                      Whether you think you can..... or you think you can't..... your 100 % correct.

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