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Sleep Apnea, who's at risk and what you can do about it

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  • Sleep Apnea, who's at risk and what you can do about it

    I just wanted to start up a thread for this, since it turned into a big discussion on a different thread.

    Who's at risk?
    What can you do to test for it?
    How do you treat it?

    There was a cool device that monitored you heart rate during the night. I dunno if you could use it for other purposes though, like monitoring heart rate during exercise.

    I will post links to the other discussions a bit later, but I figure this is good place to gather all info directly relevant to this here.
    My journal where I attempt to overcome Chrohns and make good food as well

  • #2
    I have battled sleep apnea... When my weight gets over a certain #, It's a problem.

    There can be several reasons that one has it... My reasons are 3 fold. I have golf ball size tonsils (didn't know that was abnormal until I was about 37), I have (make that HAD) HUGE turbinates, and I'm over fat!

    To test. The no cost edition: Your partener freaks out because you hold your breath and gasp for air off an on all night long. AND/OR you snore loud enough to wake the dead. Expensive test... Sleep study. You are recorded on video, as well as connected to a bunch of electrodes on your head. Good luck sleeping. I was waking every 10 or so seconds a night. Makes for a cortisol horror story!

    How to treat... In my case, I can have my tonsils removed, or a relatively new procedure that shrinks the tonsils (short office visit, perhaps with sedation). (have not done this yet.). Turbinates can be shrunk. This is done by numbing the nose, and a little electrical devise is inserted and the bump is zapped. This is done in the office under a local. I had this done, and it's been really helpful. I lamely had a panic attack after they numbed my nose, and roof of mouth. Passed out, woke to an ammonia stick. The proceed. It stinks. You can smell the burnt flesh. Take someone with. Kind of wipes you out. Then you spend a few weeks healing blowing gross crust out of your nose. Finished off with a professional nose picking. Then WOW!

    Lose fat! (PB is helping tremendously). For me it was just a few pounds making the difference. I'm reported to be quiet and breathing with consistency through the night.

    And finally, you can end up on a variety of CPAP machines. If your nose is clear, you can get one that is just below your nose, and puffs air in to remind your body to inhale. If you're like me and still have issues with passages, you end up looking like a freak at bed time with what looks like a total oxygen mask. I HATE it, and it's not conducive to having children that wake you over and over again. But helps when you're gasping for air.

    So... lots of reasons why. A partner can tell you if you are suffering, a sleep study will confirm it. And there are a multitude of approaches.

    Good luck!

    Oh, and it MUST be dealt with. Bad sleep = cortisol = fat, and also = bad moods, poor mental performance, regular exhaustion all which = too tired to cook healthy meals, and workout at any leve = fat! Also cause for major stress on the heart which can lead to early death by heart attack. See the cycles! It sucks!

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    • #3
      I don't have a partner so I can't do that test.

      Here's a link to the thread that gets lost often. The discussion starts at post #40 and continues to the end.

      This unit looked great. $125. I'm not sure how much a medical study is and it might be hard to sleep with people watching you sleep.

      http://www.clinicalguard.com/cms50e-...eter-p-89.html
      My journal where I attempt to overcome Chrohns and make good food as well

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      • #4
        Originally posted by strom View Post
        I don't have a partner so I can't do that test.
        I DO have a partner but I still would never be able to get him to stay up and watch me sleep for hours. I'm going with the monitor you mentioned or something similair as soon as I can afford it. And as soon as I can get into a sleep study I will. I don't mind people watching me sleep as long as they don't bother me

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        • #5
          The sleep study is expensive. You should have insurance to cover it, or just be willing to drop some serious cash!

          The O2 monitor seems like a good idea. And indicator at least that you might be losing your oxygen. But once you know that... you'll still have to get a study (generally) in order to get any necessary assistance. It would be VERY dangerous to try to set up your own CPap, and I'm sure you could get them on e-bay, or privately. But unless you know what you're doing... BAD BAD BAD idea.

          Maybe talk with your doc. Let him/her know you think you apnea.. and how you might avoid the costly eval.

          Actually, it wasn't my DH that alerted me to my snoring, and gasping. It was my mother. From another room!!! Every time she stays with us, I get an update. DH sleeps through crazy stuff inclusive of SCREAMING BABIES next to his head.

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          • #6
            Also, do you wake gasping? I have actually woke up to a choking sensation. And I've woke myself snoring, I can be so loud.

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            • #7
              I rarely wake up, unless I drank too much and have to create urethra. I sometimes even have conversations with people while asleep, my responses usually are out there since I'm not really conscious of what I'm saying. I tend to forget these, but the person I'm talking to doesn't. My trouble is falling asleep since my mind tends to race before I sleep, and waking up. I tend to not really wake up until noon, even while working. So for a good 3 hours I'm kind of zombie like. I don't use coffee since it gives me a headache and bothers my stomach. Never a big fan of the taste and its effects are inconsistent for me.
              My journal where I attempt to overcome Chrohns and make good food as well

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              • #8
                I sometimes have a hard time falling asleep for the same reason. I'm processing my day(s). I use some meditation CDs . Check out brain sync. They have some free downloads to try. I have lots of friends that these are quite helpful with regards to relaxing and such!

                I talk in my sleep too! I think that means you're not getting deep enough. Which would explain exhaustion.

                What time do you go to bed? What are you doing in the last 2 hours?

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                • #9
                  I have been trying to get to bed at 11 or 10, but lately its been more midnight. I tend to be either browsing the internet, 3d artwork, reading or trying to calm myself down enough to fall asleep.
                  My journal where I attempt to overcome Chrohns and make good food as well

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                  • #10
                    Yeah... you're making your brain work right before bed... And then you want it to instantly relax. We all do it... I'd take a steaming hot shower, followed by a cold blast... and then go zone out for a bit... THEN hit the hay...

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                    • #11
                      My dd has sleep apnea--has since she was a baby--she was born with a birth defect that causes it--and has spent most of her life sitting up in her sleep and snoring to beat the band. She had her tonsils out at 3, and she has a cpap (full face mask) and for a teen age girl, can be quite the fight at times to get her to wear it. BUT I can sure tell the difference in her attitude and moods when she does use it. And it affects her performance in school as well. I can not tell you how many nights I have stood in her doorway making sure she is still breathing, and she actually slept with me when I was a single mom, so I could shake her or move her when she would stop breathing in her sleep. Scary stuff... When we did her sleep study, she had 690 episodes in a 6 hour period, like one every 90 seconds or so.

                      Course, her sleep apnea is not weight related. Just chiming in to say, I hear ya.
                      Last edited by Spinner; 07-23-2010, 04:53 AM.
                      Every day is another stitch in the quilt of life.
                      ~*~*~*~*~*~*~
                      Re-Start date 6/23/2011
                      me--Post pregnancy --mama to a beautiful baby boy--
                      273.4/269.3/115
                      Hubby--230/227.8/165

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                      • #12
                        Be sure to follow the link and read all of the sleep apnea posts in that thread. All of them.
                        http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...nea#post160980

                        Originally posted by Paleo Man
                        Something else that she's mentioned elsewhere and that I consider to be a matter of life and death, and that is still frequently overlooked and underdiagnosed - obstructive sleep apnea.

                        One can almost safely presume that middle aged men with bad cardiovascular indications and tiredness are suffering from obstructive sleep apnea, until proven otherwise. The rates are extremely high. I won't go into the reasons here, but they tie in with Primal.

                        The words "obstructive sleep apnea" will never appear on a death certificate, but the condition causes fatigue, brain damage, atherosclerosis, hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, liver failure, and apparently even contributes to bad lipid profiles. It can prevent weight loss despite all efforts to lose weight. A Mayo Clinic review confirms much of this and notes that the 8 year mortality rate for significant sleep apnea is a chilling 40%:

                        http://www.mayoclinicproceedings.com.../1036.full.pdf

                        Obstructive sleep apnea has also been implicated in contributing to Type II Diabetes, depending on the studies and controls, causing increases three to nine fold. There are few other readily treatable conditions that can shorten a man's life so much and so dramatically if untreated.

                        Well worth checking out, sooner rather than later. People literally die from it while pondering whether to check on it. And their death certificates usually read something like "cardiac arrest" and ignore the root cause - obstructive sleep apnea. Snoring is a major clue that it is likely in progress.
                        It's not difficult. The right thing is simple: get tested, get treated. Don't delay.

                        For many with significant apnea and significant excess weight, it will be nearly impossible to loose weight without treating the apnea.



                        iherb referral code CIL457- $5 off first order

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                        • #13
                          Check for snoring at night with no one to listen: Get a sound activated tape recorder. Set up to record what ever sounds go bump in the night. Listen in the AM. You won't have to listen to hours of blank tape since it only starts to record when there is noise. It won't let you know anything about timing and number of episodes, but you will learn if you snore and have apnea.

                          Sometimes sleep apnea is addressed by removing the uvula and a bit of the tissue around the throat if clearing obstructions in the sinus or reducing or removing tonsils fails to provide relief. I would prefer to concentrate on losing weight. When you are too fat around the belly etal, you are also too fat around the throat.

                          Trouble winding down before sleep? Try some breathing exercise or even some meditation. Get out of any habit of using bed for anything other than sleep----well, eliminate most other things, anyway. No reading, no writing letters or journals, etc. Train yourself to know that bed=sleep, not TV,Books, etc.
                          Tayatha om bekandze

                          Bekandze maha bekandze

                          Randza samu gate soha

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                          • #14
                            I snore and talk in my sleep, i sometimes snore myself away, and my partner wears earplugs every night

                            maybe it wont be as bad after another 80bs of weightloss
                            Starting Weight : 338lbs 6/11/2010
                            Current Weight: 266lbs
                            High-school Weight: 235lbs
                            Goal: ????

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                            • #15
                              The thing is I don't think snoring is enough proof to show that I might have some sleep condition. The sound activated thing sounds cool, yet I only have a simpler digital voice recorder. I dunno if that would work.
                              My journal where I attempt to overcome Chrohns and make good food as well

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