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Pandora's Seed: The Unforeseen Cost of Civilization

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  • Pandora's Seed: The Unforeseen Cost of Civilization

    This is a new book being released in the UK. It sounds very interesting and from the review seems to support many elements of the "Primal Blueprint".

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/sc...s-1993055.html

  • #2
    The author was on The Colbert Report last night and I thought the same thing. His thesis seemed to be that farming and eating grains had brought about the obesity, diabetes, heart disease epidemic.

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    • #3
      I'm certainly not a fan of grains and think that they're sub-optimal but I wouldn't be so quick to blame those diseases on grains, or at least the level that we're seeing now. Many cultures have lived on lots of grains and didn't suffer anywhere near as greatly as is seen today. Sure they were smaller, weaker, and degenerated more quickly than the hunter-gatherers under similar environmental conditions but different diets. These cultures were eating the "better" grains (not wheat, oats, etc and not highly processed into kashi bars or some shit) and they were soaked/sprouted or even fermented. It's undeniable that the agricultural revolution made humans less healthy but eventually we adapted to a degree both in our genetics and our memetics and I really really wouldn't point all of this catastrophy solely on traditional agriculture. More like modern chemistry and bastardization of the food supply in general. Not to mention all of the other factors like vitamin d deficiency.

      Oh except for wheat. Wheat can suck it.
      Stabbing conventional wisdom in its face.

      Anyone who wants to talk nutrition should PM me!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Stabby View Post
        Wheat can suck it.
        Agreed!
        semper ad meliora

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Stabby View Post
          Not to mention all of the other factors like vitamin d deficiency.
          this.



          iherb referral code CIL457- $5 off first order

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          • #6
            and chronic stress. Instead of sitting around a campfire swapping tall tales we sit and watch three hours of tension-inducing, highly realistic angst-ridden drama and crime.

            We constantly deal with strangers. People's brains are wired for small communities.

            Exogenic pseudo-hormones, don't know the correct term, but the hormone like substances in plastics and chemicals.

            Electromagnetic radiation pops its head up now and then. I've yet to see any decent, nutjob-free research on it, but given the importance of tiny electrical fields to the function of cells and the body in general, I wouldn't be surprised if there was a grain of truth in it.

            But I don't have any issues with putting agriculture front-and-center in the lineup.

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            • #7
              People's brains are wired for small communities.
              Do you have more information on this?

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              • #8
                um. no. I've seen pretty solid things on it... American Scientific 'Mind' magazine maybe... makes sense when you think about it, given that for a fair bit of human history, we lived in small bands. I think around 100 is the maximum number of individuals you can maintain meaningful relationships with. Try googling?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by fyrespryte View Post
                  Do you have more information on this?
                  http://www.marksdailyapple.com/dunba...er-group-size/
                  sigpic

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by fyrespryte View Post
                    Do you have more information on this?
                    Desmond Morris, a zoologist, touches on this through various writings (some think he's a whack job, but I think he has brought up some valid points and observations), but there is quite a bit of research out there if you look that talks about how small groups are better for humans to live in. Less crime, healthier relationships, less stres etc.
                    SW: 235
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                    Rough start due to major carb WD.

                    MWF: 1 hour run/walk, 1.5 hours in the gym - upper/lower and core
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                    • #11
                      Since I have cut back considerably on grains I feel that my overal health has improved so from my own personal experience I agree with the author. I can't pin everything on grains themselves but they have to be a major consideration for a lot of our health issues we face today with the fact a lot of people are either just lazy or very uninformed.
                      Today is a new day. You will get out of it just what you put into it. If you have made mistakes, there is always another chance for you. And supposing you have tried and failed again and again, you may have a fresh start any moment you choose, for this thing we call 'Failure' is not the falling down, but the staying down.

                      Mary Pickford

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                      • #12
                        There's also a talk of Spencer Wells (unfortunately without slide):
                        http://spoken-gems.com/2010/06/10/sp...-civilisation/

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                        • #13
                          I've been a big fan of Wells ever since reading The Journey of Man. (And he's got a professorship here that means he'll be visiting at least once a year for the next couple of years - woohoo!)

                          He gave a lecture on some of the topics from his book... very interesting. It seems to put together a lot of ideas that I've read separately - about the health issues from eating an agricultural diet, the rise of diseases based on lifestyle, living in bigger communities than we're equipped to handle, chronic stress, our effects on the environment, the effects of organized religion, etc.
                          "mayness, you need to have a siggy line that says "Paleo Information Desk" or something!" -FMN <3

                          I'm blogging again, at least a little bit.

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                          • #14
                            I also love Spencer Wells and his book Journey of Man - so after seeing him on the Colbert Report, I immediately ordered Pandora's Seed. It should arrive tomorrow (amazon two day). I'll give a book report when I've got my hands on it.

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                            • #15
                              I'll have to check out this author. Thanks for the information re: smaller groups. That really spoke to me when I read it. It makes me wish that I lived in a small village, haha. Right now, I live in a pretty suburban area, right outside a city. The older I've gotten, the more drawn I've been to the idea of moving to a smaller town...even though I'm pretty much the antithesis of what most small town people would be accepting of...at least at first until they got to know me.

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