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  • Huh, I didn't realize the "raw" in "raw vegan" meant uncooked--I thought it was more along the lines of ... "unaltered", as in, no pesticides used to grow the food or something like that.

    How does that not get incredibly boring, incredibly fast?

    Edit - I looked it up on Wikipedia, and it does indeed mean uncooked (or at least partly).

    "I learned something today!" - Kyle
    Last edited by Cyborcat; 12-22-2013, 12:59 PM.
    My Blog where I talk about my experiences with improving my health and life
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    • Originally posted by Polecatz View Post
      Feel so sorry for raw vegans. Who would choose that?
      They believe that raw fruit, vegetables, nuts, grains, and beans contain enzymes which are intended to help us digest the plant, and that heating anything destroys these enzymes. So they use special equipment, like low temp dehydrators to make "crackers" from raw grains and seeds without cooking the ingredients in the process. The special equipment and time it takes means that most people can't consider preparing food this way. Therefore home cooking is not an option for those who want fancy raw vegan food.

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      • Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
        They believe that raw fruit, vegetables, nuts, grains, and beans contain enzymes which are intended to help us digest the plant, and that heating anything destroys these enzymes. So they use special equipment, like low temp dehydrators to make "crackers" from raw grains and seeds without cooking the ingredients in the process. The special equipment and time it takes means that most people can't consider preparing food this way. Therefore home cooking is not an option for those who want fancy raw vegan food.
        One of my friends is not raw vegan, but hangs out with people in that kind of scene. I dont see them often but I visited for a few days recently and every morning as well as a fried egg (they was horrified of my request for scambled because "you have to have raw yolk!") they made a giant juce drink in a seriously heavy duty industrial juicer. Basically an entire weeks supply of vegetables went in one end, and a pint glass of sludge came out the other which they downed in one. I had a small glass to try it - perhaps 1/4 pint or less - and I felt like I had had serious greens overload. It included apples, stinging nettles, spinach, rocket, blueberries, carrots, kale, and any amount of other stuff, all raw. I was not sure raw kale and stinging nettles were that great an idea.

        They also once took me to a restaurant that had an extensive raw vegan selection. I tried the soup which was tasty but utterly unfilling, and crackers made from seeds pressed and dried which were weird. And a juice on the side. Luckily for me it was inbetween mealtimes!

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        • Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
          They believe that raw fruit, vegetables, nuts, grains, and beans contain enzymes which are intended to help us digest the plant, and that heating anything destroys these enzymes. So they use special equipment, like low temp dehydrators to make "crackers" from raw grains and seeds without cooking the ingredients in the process. The special equipment and time it takes means that most people can't consider preparing food this way. Therefore home cooking is not an option for those who want fancy raw vegan food.
          Ironically, raw vegan desserts are delicious and almost paleo. Also very expensive. The cashiers at the local health food store probably think I'm vegan. XD I buy my meat directly from a farm.
          Out of context quote for the day:

          Clearly Gorbag is so awesome he should be cloned, reproducing in the normal manner would only dilute his awesomeness. - Urban Forager

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          • I've had people ask if I was vegetarian so many times in so many hilarious ways. For example:

            The cashier right before she picks up the giant bags of shrimp and fish.

            A guy in my new section at work while I was eating beef stew. Didn't understand that one; I just looked at him funny and showed him my bowl.

            My new squad leader which lucky for him, wasn't around food at the time. We did have a long conversation on nutrition afterwards. Though, now he wants me to lecture the squad, which I don't feel comfortable doing because I certainly don't like people lecturing me on what I eat, and theirs tends to be less controversial, if wrong.

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            • Originally posted by RittenRemedy View Post
              My new squad leader which lucky for him, wasn't around food at the time. We did have a long conversation on nutrition afterwards. Though, now he wants me to lecture the squad, which I don't feel comfortable doing because I certainly don't like people lecturing me on what I eat, and theirs tends to be less controversial, if wrong.
              This is tough for both you and your squad leader- in reality he has to be careful about promoting any nutritional advice outside of what the Army recommends. A better presentation might be, "This is what I did to [lose weight/improve my pt score/etc]".

              Though I'm sure that everyone has at least heard of paleo, I found that when I was dealing with other military guys, Michael Pollan's message was a little less "out there". He's not paleo, but has a lot of interesting things to say, starting from the following seven words: Eat food. Mostly plants. Not too much. His NYTimes article entitled "Unhappy Meals" is a good place to start.

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              • Originally posted by jfreaksho View Post
                This is tough for both you and your squad leader- in reality he has to be careful about promoting any nutritional advice outside of what the Army recommends. A better presentation might be, "This is what I did to [lose weight/improve my pt score/etc]".

                Though I'm sure that everyone has at least heard of paleo, I found that when I was dealing with other military guys, Michael Pollan's message was a little less "out there". He's not paleo, but has a lot of interesting things to say, starting from the following seven words: Eat food. Mostly plants. Not too much. His NYTimes article entitled "Unhappy Meals" is a good place to start.
                Yeah, I still think he's under the impression I eat "healthy." Just need a few more weeks of bringing in dinners of a pound of lamb or oxtails to sort him out hehe.

                We're aware of not really being able to cross the army, but at the same point, at least two other people on my shift are low carb and the marines are familiar with PB, so it's not unheard of out here. At least it makes for a more friendly work environment; my last group was mostly Korean so lots of Asian CW and American low fat/brown rice and vegetarian CW coming from that end.

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                • When I was on a Girl Scout camping trip, I asked for all the bacon grease from the three pounds of bacon we were frying up. One of the leaders was shocked, and said, 'I thought you ate healthy.' I said, 'I do, just a different definition of healthy.' She thought that was great, and now saves bacon grease for me.

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                  • I've noticed that about 40-50% of my diet is the same as a raw vegan, its just that the rest is made up of cooked foods - veg, meat, fish etc. What they say about raw food being good for health is totally correct, but its only part of the story of course. Not surprised that some people on here are taken to be raw vegans occasionally.
                    Healthy is the new wealthy.

                    http://www.facebook.com/groups/ances...handnutrition/

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                    • Currently sitting at work, listening to a "good old boy" tell another employee about his Christmas dinner:

                      "Well, we had a good Cajun Christmas. We had white beans and rice, cornbread, good gravy, deep fried turkey and deep fried ham. And Jambalaya! Ooooh bebe it was SO SO good." (jambalaya = sausage/chicken/seafood combo with veggies in rice made with a flour roux)

                      I don't think I have to tell you what shape he's in....


                      I also mentioned a couple weeks ago that I was gluten free, and then had to explain what gluten was, and why I wasn't eating all the cookies and crackers people were sending the company for Christmas. Now I just keep my mouth shut and people at work don't invite me to lunch when they go because I'm "the healthy girl who eats salads".

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                      • Originally posted by Kwaggz View Post
                        Currently sitting at work, listening to a "good old boy" tell another employee about his Christmas dinner:

                        "Well, we had a good Cajun Christmas. We had white beans and rice, cornbread, good gravy, deep fried turkey and deep fried ham. And Jambalaya! Ooooh bebe it was SO SO good." (jambalaya = sausage/chicken/seafood combo with veggies in rice made with a flour roux)

                        I don't think I have to tell you what shape he's in....


                        I also mentioned a couple weeks ago that I was gluten free, and then had to explain what gluten was, and why I wasn't eating all the cookies and crackers people were sending the company for Christmas. Now I just keep my mouth shut and people at work don't invite me to lunch when they go because I'm "the healthy girl who eats salads".
                        When you get to go, rock their would with a steak, bacon etc. Lol

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                        • Oh it's alright, I don't want to go to lunch with them anyway. The places they go to for lunch aren't places I would go if given a choice, I always know the food I bring from home is unprocessed and high quality, who knows what these "restaurants" cook their food in!!! After my boss made fun of me for being "vegan", "vegetarian", "ohhh do you want a donut? they're organic!" (hint: they weren't), I just stopped telling people anything about my diet and ate in private, because it's just easier.


                          The South is a tough place to make good food choices, y'all. They're always going to be the last to change, in regards to ANYTHING. Took this CT Yankee a little while to figure it out.

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                          • Originally posted by Kwaggz View Post
                            Oh it's alright, I don't want to go to lunch with them anyway. The places they go to for lunch aren't places I would go if given a choice, I always know the food I bring from home is unprocessed and high quality, who knows what these "restaurants" cook their food in!!! After my boss made fun of me for being "vegan", "vegetarian", "ohhh do you want a donut? they're organic!" (hint: they weren't), I just stopped telling people anything about my diet and ate in private, because it's just easier.


                            The South is a tough place to make good food choices, y'all. They're always going to be the last to change, in regards to ANYTHING. Took this CT Yankee a little while to figure it out.
                            The Midwest is a hold out for CW too. The only good news about that is smart folks like my mom and grandparents never really went super low fat when all that kicked in. We had 2% milk when I was growing up, but switched to organic whole milk as soon as it was available in grocery stores. Although I did have to explain that no wheat doesn't exactly mean scrape off the breading...

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                            • Originally posted by Kwaggz View Post
                              The South is a tough place to make good food choices, y'all. They're always going to be the last to change, in regards to ANYTHING. Took this CT Yankee a little while to figure it out.
                              I'm a Multi-state Yankee (NY, NJ, OH, WA, OR, and Northern CA), but I agree. My landlord asked me what I thought of New Orleans, and I told him that mostly it was fine, but that sometimes I felt like I was living in a third world country.

                              That said, if I were invited to a good old fashioned Cajun Christmas (with no children running around screaming), I'd probably accept just for the experience.

                              This is my third Christmas without my traditional lasagna (my family's traditional yummy for the day of Christmas), and I'm surprised that I don't miss it. I keep thinking, "next Christmas," or "next birthday," but then it gets close and I put it off for another year.
                              "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

                              B*tch-lite

                              Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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                              • I had a sad CW Christmas moment.
                                My aunt, who is 69, overweight and sickly, has been impressed by my weightloss and keeps saying that she should "do like" me.
                                For Christmas dinner she brought home some pâté/meat spread, saying that she didn't want to have it home for fear of eating too much.
                                My mother quipped in: "It's not the bread that makes you fat, it what you spread on it!"
                                This, after my losing over 35 pounds on what I call the "butter diet" (a shortcut for my family).
                                My aunt added that she would try to cut on meat, pâtés and sausages next year.
                                Err, what part of "I lost 35 pounds by cutting out grains and sugar" didn't she get??? Apparently, every word, because her gift to me contained biscuits!

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