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  • Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
    I blame the environment. I think a major factor (but not the only factor) is maternal nutrition, in particular a low fat/low saturated fat and maybe high PUFA diet during a critical neural development period.
    agreed, this would be interesting
    Karin


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    • This, my friends, is the beginning of a beautiful relationship.

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      • Originally posted by athomeontherange View Post
        I think I get where you are coming from and you are right that it is cause for concern. I have recently had to switch my daughter's therapist because the one we had basically said, i have done all I can (after 3 years). This new one is wondering if her diagnosis is not off a little and she is more on the autism scale than we thought. So, we also have to look at her meds- still.. again.. etc. ADHD is HARD to diagnose. There is not simple one test fits all. It can be a series of symptoms.
        *nods* That's another potential issue: the wrong therapist. Humans do, after all, have preconceptions and biases, so a therapist can easily get something slightly wrong, due to it being outside their experience/knowledge. The best solution there is usually to see a few therapists, so you can get a more rounded picture.
        Glad you're back on the path to discovering how to help your daughter. Not that I'm glad you haven't got it sorted yet, but as in I'm glad you're getting closer to knowing what's best for her.
        --
        Perfection is entirely individual. Any philosophy or pursuit that encourages individuality has merit in that it frees people. Any that encourages shackles only has merit in that it shows you how wrong and desperate the human mind can get in its pursuit of truth.

        --
        I get blunter and more narcissistic by the day.
        I'd apologize, but...

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        • Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
          I blame the environment. I think a major factor (but not the only factor) is maternal nutrition, in particular a low fat/low saturated fat and maybe high PUFA diet during a critical neural development period.
          This is exactly my train of thought with this conversation. Just because something can't be "fixed" with diet doesn't make the diet not responsible in the first place. Another favorite of mine are "hereditary" diseases like heart disease and diabetes where heredity means eating the same garbage as your parents (to some extent).
          I wish I liked to eat liver.

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          • I'm in the gym, and two girls on the ellipticals behind me are talking about the calorie counter thing in the machine. Apparently they've been here for awhile and have only burned through the pie they had at lunch and can't believe all the hard work only amounted to one piece of pie.

            They're skinnier than me though, so I'm just talking about them on the internet. 0_0

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            • Originally posted by UniqueTII View Post
              This is exactly my train of thought with this conversation. Just because something can't be "fixed" with diet doesn't make the diet not responsible in the first place. Another favorite of mine are "hereditary" diseases like heart disease and diabetes where heredity means eating the same garbage as your parents (to some extent).
              Celiac runs in my family. Shockingly, tons of people died of abdominal cancer before they'd specify which part had cancer. But if you ask my mother, it's not related in any way, shape, or form to food.
              Most people don't realize how much energy it takes for me to pretend to be normal.

              If I wanted to listen to an asshole, I'd fart.

              Twibble's Twibbly Wibbly

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              • I mentioned my sulfite allergy and what all that entails, everything I hafta avoid, to a woman trying to help me at the grocery store. I kid you not, her response was "well, just eat it then. You can't be THAT allergic."
                Ummm... WHAT?!
                Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, steak in one hand, chocolate in the other, yelling "Holy F***, What a Ride!"
                My Latest Journal

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                • A friend on Facebook, who is obese (after having gastric bypass surgery years ago), always has terrible health problems, is constantly hospitalized, whose obese husband has constant health problems and hospitalizations, and who asked me to help her learn paleo and then immediately gave up and went back to making cornbread mac 'n cheese or whatever for every meal, posted this today:

                  I guess I am the only mom that doesn't monitor the Halloween candy intake. We check it and let them go at it. I figure the sooner it's gone, the better. It usually only lasts a few days and then we are stuck with a few tootsie rolls and dum dum suckers. [Kid 1] and [Kid 2] will probably even take care of those and then we will be candy free! When I was a kid, we ate it all and got it over with. What are your thoughts?
                  I kept my thoughts to myself.

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                  • Originally posted by Mr. Anthony View Post
                    A friend on Facebook, who is obese (after having gastric bypass surgery years ago), always has terrible health problems, is constantly hospitalized, whose obese husband has constant health problems and hospitalizations, and who asked me to help her learn paleo and then immediately gave up and went back to making cornbread mac 'n cheese or whatever for every meal, posted this today:

                    I guess I am the only mom that doesn't monitor the Halloween candy intake. We check it and let them go at it. I figure the sooner it's gone, the better. It usually only lasts a few days and then we are stuck with a few tootsie rolls and dum dum suckers. [Kid 1] and [Kid 2] will probably even take care of those and then we will be candy free! When I was a kid, we ate it all and got it over with. What are your thoughts?
                    I kept my thoughts to myself.
                    When I was a kid, kids went out trick or treating in groups. When we got cold or tired we came home. Then my mother would allow us to pick out a certain number of pieces to keep, and the rest got thrown out, candy corn mixed with dirt in the bottom of my bag.

                    Parents would accompany their toddlers on a walk around the neighborhood.

                    My daughter never ate the candy that she collected. Well, maybe a piece or two, but of course she preferred the good stuff we served at home, and didn't miss those stale little candy bar bites.

                    Now it's a competition among adults to see how much loot they can get for their kids by busing them around to different neighborhoods for hours. And it's all about stale, adulterated store-bought candy.

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                    • Originally posted by naiadknight View Post
                      I mentioned my sulfite allergy and what all that entails, everything I hafta avoid, to a woman trying to help me at the grocery store. I kid you not, her response was "well, just eat it then. You can't be THAT allergic."
                      Ummm... WHAT?!
                      That's ridiculous. Not to mention rude... I think that many of us are so in tune with our bodies we actually notice it when we feel bloated (and tired, achy, and pimply in my case) after eating something that affects us (wheat! ;c) while everyone else just chalks it up to "eating too much" or "aging."

                      That's what I did for years. After a big pasta dinner, my whole family actually always complains of bloating. I wonder if maybe we all are sensitive. I've heard that celts have a high chance of gluten intolerance.

                      I was watching a show and one of the ladies brings in pumpkin muffins "gluten free!" The other characters responses were "blech" and "why?"

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                      • I think it has everything to do with the idea that "if I can eat [that thing you are allergic to], then your allergy doesn't exist." It's the ultimate n=1.

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                        • I chalked it up to stupidity and walked away. One thing my allergist said is that more people are allergic to sulfites than are diagnosed, because the symptoms vary so widely and are so closely associated with "getting old" and "normal" for your SAD American: headaches, aching joints, inflammation, digestive issues, trouble breathing or asthma attacks, fatigue, foggy headedness, etc.
                          It's really not even on you can ask a server about, because the list of stuff it hides in is so damn long. You just hafta know what it can show up in and which words to watch out for.
                          Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, steak in one hand, chocolate in the other, yelling "Holy F***, What a Ride!"
                          My Latest Journal

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                          • Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
                            I blame the environment. I think a major factor (but not the only factor) is maternal nutrition, in particular a low fat/low saturated fat and maybe high PUFA diet during a critical neural development period.
                            Originally posted by UniqueTII View Post
                            This is exactly my train of thought with this conversation. Just because something can't be "fixed" with diet doesn't make the diet not responsible in the first place. Another favorite of mine are "hereditary" diseases like heart disease and diabetes where heredity means eating the same garbage as your parents (to some extent).
                            The book Deep Nutrition by Catherine Shanahan is really interesting on this subject. She explains really well how what and how we eat affect not only us, but our children and grandchildren, etc.

                            Deep Nutrition: Why Your Genes Need Traditional Food: Catherine Shanahan, Luke Shanahan: 9780615228389: Amazon.com: Books
                            No disease that can be treated by diet should be treated with any other means.
                            -Maimonodies

                            The cure for anything is salt water - sweat, tears, or the sea.

                            Babes with BBQ

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                            • More "healthy advice" thanks to social media. She details her transition to plain Greek yogurt instead of artificially sweetened pre-made cups, which is good and gets her to eat healthy things like fruits, nuts and seeds. Then she lists her 14 favorite toppings: strawberry jam and chocolate syrup, cherrios and honey, maple syrup, more honey, pumpkin pie mix, graham crackers, peanut butter and topped with peanuts and chocolate syrup, you get the idea. A few actually did have fruit in them.

                              And a second one (I seriously need to get off the computer right after I post this):
                              "Every time you go more than two hours or so without eating, your blood sugar drops—and that's bad news for your energy. Here's why: Food supplies the body with glucose, a type of sugar carried in the bloodstream. Our cells use glucose to make the body's prime energy transporter, adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Your brain needs it. Your muscles need it. Every cell in your body needs it. But when blood sugar drops, your cells don't have the raw materials to make ATP. And then? Everything starts to slow down. You get tired, hungry, irritable and unfocused. Grab a bite every two to four hours to keep blood sugar steady. Nosh on something within an hour of waking—that's when blood sugar is lowest."

                              ^having been there, done that, no... just no... goodnight all!
                              Last edited by RittenRemedy; 11-02-2013, 08:26 AM.

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                              • Not so much funny as sad: on another forum someone was saying that a Finnish friend of hers was horrified that UK advice is to feed children full fat dairy. Apparently in Finland they are told to feed their kids the skimmed stuff and
                                make up the calories with vegetable oil!


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