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How long after eating, does your body start to burn fat

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  • How long after eating, does your body start to burn fat



    The eating schedule I've devised for myself generally follows two meals a day (noon-ish and 7-8 PM). That leaves up to 16 hours without eating with a 7-8 hour break betweewn two meals in the day. How long after eating, does it take for your body to begin burining fat, instead of using the food you just ate for fuel... Or am I drastically under-simplifying the process?


  • #2
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    I think it depends on what you're eating- how many calories as well as how much fat/protein/carbs.

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    • #3
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      I should have included that. Macros depend on mood/craving. Calories fall between 700-1000 per meal.

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      • #4
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        I was under the impression our bodies could burn fat albeit in different percentages relative to insulin levels (0% utilization when high, 90-100% when fasting?).

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        • #5
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          Follow-up: so I would personally take the average amount of time food X gets digested + time insulin clears out of the system...


          Sped up by exercise I guess?

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          • #6
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            It depends on the food. Most fruits are digested within 30 minutes because they are already in the form of sugar and don't have to be broken down as much. However, so fruits such as bananas can take up to an hour to digest. Nuts typically take somewhere in the 3 hour range, and meats and dairy can take 4-6 hours depending on how much your body has to break it down (red meats taking the longest). Everything in your body is broken down to glucose and stored as glycogen. However, some foods are closer to being in the form of glucose already when entering the body (glucose, fructose, sucrose and anything else ending in -ose is a sugar already), proteins and fats however are going to take a lot longer to break down into sugar, thus the lack of a insulin spike when you eat them.

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            • #7
              1



              And that explanation only included a simplification of eating one food and/or macronutrient at a time, when mixed it becomes even more complex. I personally believe it is easier to tell based on knowing your body. Whether or not you feel bloated, the timing of your bowel movements etc.

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