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  • #16
    1



    Ouis, Wendy, I suffered from spring hay fever for fifty years (since age 12) and thought I'd tried everything under the sun for it. But then last year I tried the "specific carbohydrate diet" from Elaine Gottschall's book "Breaking the Vicious Cycle", which is for people with severe digestive diseases, and I broke my hay fever cycles, as well. I had maybe 5% of normal allergy, and the spring was especially bad for everyone else. People going to the emergency room for cortisone shots, etc. I didn't even sneeze till June 15!


    I just wrote a few more details about this eating system on the New Grok Day 1 thread.


    It has quite a bit in common with Primal. One does have to be more careful during allergy season with one's 20% non-compliance -- for me it will be more like 2% non-compliance till July, I believe. For instance, I will omit dairy this spring, and probably several springs to come -- but I expect the same wonderful miracle I experienced last spring. Amazing how good it felt to avoid that chronic fatigue from six weeks of severe hay fever.

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    • #17
      1



      I've been low carb and almost entirely grain free for several years now (though not specifically primal for most of that) and I still have seasonal allergies. Better? Maybe sometimes I think so, but then the full-on Midwestern allergy season hits and I still needed my Claritin and decongestant. I might experiment with the dairy thing this year -- though to be perfectly honest I'm not sure I'm motivated enough; when it comes right down to it I'd rather sneeze a bit than not have Greek yogurt.

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      • #18
        1



        Prairie Prof --- before I experienced the hay fever wonder cure last year, I already had known for a long time that leaving out all dairy would cut hay fever in half.


        The theory from Elaine Gottschall made sense of this, because the lactose is a disaccharide, so it contributes to having a leaky gut. It's the leaky gut which lets big proteins through into the blood stream, so the immune system gets all upset and trigger-happy, especially when some of the proteins are gluten and gliadin, and are similar to the grass pollens entering the nose. Grains are grasses, after all.


        But I think there's another reason that dairy can make hay fever worse. When young animals are new born, they have undeveloped immune systems. Mother's milk gives them immunity while they are getting their own set up -- hence dairy products stimulate (irritate and excite?) the immune system, increasing inflammation.


        Just a theory ... anyway, your call, but I think it would be interesting for you to temporarily give up the dairy (after all, spring is over soon enough) to see what happens to your allergies. You can always go back to the Greek yoghurt later.


        I'm off dairy till at least midsummer, for the same reason, but also because my cheese habit gets out of hand easily, and people here have said that cheese is insulinogenic and makes it harder to lose weight. I really do need to lose weight.

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        • #19
          1



          wendy1:


          I am allergic to some kind of spring grass, VERY allergic to Timothy hay (almost died once), Yellowjacket stings, and an antibiotic called Bactrim.


          I didn't have a problem with the seasonals last year at all, but am still not taking chances with the other things at this point :-(

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          • #20
            1



            I certainly agree it would be an interesting experiment to give up dairy, but boy do I ever think it would make me feel angry and deprived. I like eggs perfectly well, but I'm not willing to eat them for breakfast every single morning, or meat either for that matter. And I've been maintaining my low-carb weight loss for several years now, so it's really hard to get into the enthusiastic mode about cutting back further. Maybe when the allergies kick in, I'll feel more motivated to try....

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            • #21
              1



              Well, last night I had a salami meatza made with plenty of whole milk mozzarella and parmesan cheese. This morning my sinuses are clearer than they've been in weeks--go figure. I've had seasonal allergies since I can remember (and Mom says I was practically born sneezing). Today, without the benefit of Zyrtec or Flonase, I will attempt to survive visiting a household with 2 medium-furred indoor cats (cat dander has been the other bane of my nasal existence).

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              • #22
                1



                It is approaching that time of year when I would usually get an injection of Kennelog (spelling? a powerful steroid) to fight through my spring and summer allergies. It's been a few years now since I've needed it. I have totally cleared my pet dander, grass, hayfever, pollen, mold, etc allergies through adopting the Paleo/Primal nutrition.


                It has been literally like flipping a switch to shut it all off. Zirtec, Flonase, Claratin, hell, I'd take nighttime Nyquil and a shot of whiskey to put myself OUT some evenings, allergies used to debilitate me for the summer months.


                I think the elimination of grains, seed/veggie/grain industrial oils and sugar were the key for me. Eliminating dairy has been a bonus of late (general nasal/mouth breathing issue from underdeveloped "skinny" face typical of SAD fed kids, alas, and at 41 yrs of age, that is not changing). Elimination diets, go 6 weeks or so, can tell you volumes. I've been finding the Paleo/Primal nutrition is more about the elimination of certain things, NOT the inclusion of foods with "magical" properties.

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                • #23
                  1



                  "I've been finding the Paleo/Primal nutrition is more about the elimination of certain things, NOT the inclusion of foods with 'magical' properties."


                  Amen and seconded. That's made it a lot easier for me to quickly and easily recommend to people (if they're interested, of course).


                  I had skin eczema for the first time a couple years ago, but since I cut out the crap it's been relegated to minor occasional flareups. Also my lifetime minor allergy symptoms to pollen and such are almost nonexistent, and I haven't gotten sick in going on five years except for minor headaches, which are much less often than before. (I admit the new monitor helps with that last part

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                  • #24
                    1



                    Oy. eliminating dairy. I don't do so well with deprivation--of course, I truly suffer with fatigue and exhaustion around my allergies, so I guess it would be worth it to try. I have been lowcarb for years, so I don't think eliminating grains is the key here, cause I eliminated them years ago. I'm at least open to trying it for a few days

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                    • #25
                      1



                      Ouis, Prairie Prof ---


                      Good luck, but in my experience, if you give up dairy for the allergy season you should have the avoidance well in place several weeks before the pollen starts. It takes time to heal your leaky gut and get the remnants of dairy out of your system.


                      No free lunch, alas.


                      As for "deprivation" feelings, my way around them is to add in the yummiest stuff I can to take the place of the cheese (mmmmmmmmmmmmm, cchhhheeeeeeeeessssse!!), stuff like wild-caught extremely fresh salmon with toasted almonds and lemon, Prime Rib or Filet, very rare lamb, and putting shiitake mushrooms and other goodies in the omelet. Also, promising myself a really good cheese fest once the season winds down. And carrying through on it -- going to the coop, which has an incredible assortment of cheese from all over the world, and just helping myself to whatever types I feel like, even if I have to sort of squint and look between my fingers when I write the check. After giving way totally like this, I find that I don't suffer that nagging, gimme, gimme thing even with cheese.


                      It's not like one has to give up cheese for a lifetime --- just during hay fever season, or till one's condition is good enough that some cheese won't trigger congestion anymore. I'm not there yet.

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