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  • This article hit home for me, for some reason...

    So I've never been obese, just overweight. At 186 pounds a few years ago, I was pushing the limit of what the Army allows me to weigh, without doing body composition testing. I lost about 40 pounds, and recently I've been trying to put a few on, so I'm just a little over 150 most days.

    My mom has T2D, congenital heart problems, hypothyroid, and is obese. My little sister was built just like my mom, until she was about 21 or so, and lost weight the conventional way, hopefully preventing the rest of the issues Mom deals with. Most of the rest of my family is skinny-fat. (Growing up, some basic staples always in the house were whole wheat bread, cereal, diet coke, and margarine.)

    Anyways, I've never been fat, but I've seen it, and this article gave me a different perspective on it:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/01/ma...trap.html?_r=1

    It ends up talking about how ghrelin and leptin are messed up in most people that lose more than a certain amount of weight, and how those hormones work against your efforts to maintain a healthy weight.

    What I found really interesting here was the constant maintenance efforts that these people have to go through to lose weight the CW way. It is an amazing amount of trouble that these people are going through to maintain a healthy weight- super strict diets that involve weighing *everything*. Something about this article brought it home for me, I guess. I kinda feel sad for them.

    Finally, on page 3 of the above article, I found out about the National Weight Control Registry. This is an organization that collects information from people who have lost at least 30 pounds and kept it off for at least a year. They take this information to produce recommendations for people who are trying to lose weight. A lot of it seems to CW-type stuff, but perhaps that can change. :shiftyeyes:

  • #2
    I see so many people struggle to lose or maintain weight. People without weight issues always scoff and use words like lazy, slob, glutton....all those derogatory terms. But they just don't get it - the don't understand how difficult it is to fight the hormonal compulsion to eat. It is actually damned near impossible when your hormones are messed up.

    I submitted my info to the registry. If they use me, then my primal eating can seep in to their data. We should all join it!
    Using low lectin/nightshade free primal to control autoimmune arthritis. (And lost 50 lbs along the way )

    http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html

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    • #3
      I haven't lost 30 pounds, but I never was very overweight anyway. Guess I can't join the registry.

      I'm on a couple of other forums, and there's always a battle between people preaching bizarre diets and those that say "Move more, eat less". It's very frustrating, to say the least. I really do wish there was a way you could reach them both, short of showing up their doorsteps and shaking them.
      Durp.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by RitaRose View Post
        *snip*
        short of showing up their doorsteps and shaking them.
        You made me think of this clip (NSFW) Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back - Kick Some Ass - YouTube

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        • #5
          Originally posted by jfreaksho View Post
          You made me think of this clip (NSFW) Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back - Kick Some Ass - YouTube
          Yes! That! Except maybe beat them with a big steak and then EAT it!
          Durp.

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          • #6
            I read the entire article. Very interesting. One thing in particular stood out. When they took tissue biopsies of the muscles of people who lost weight, their muscles tended to be more slow twitch muscles which burn fewer calories than fast twitch muscles.

            Is that because most of them did chronic cardio to lose weight? Do you think sprinting is possibly a remedy for this?

            ~rc

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            • #7
              Originally posted by sixpack-rc View Post
              I read the entire article. Very interesting. One thing in particular stood out. When they took tissue biopsies of the muscles of people who lost weight, their muscles tended to be more slow twitch muscles which burn fewer calories than fast twitch muscles.

              Is that because most of them did chronic cardio to lose weight? Do you think sprinting is possibly a remedy for this?

              ~rc
              I saw that too, and I think both sprinting and lifting heavy things are remedies for this, but a lot of people who are trying to lose weight don't do either. I'm pretty sure I lost a good amount of muscle when I lost all that weight. I wasn't lifting or running, or even doing chronic cardio- I ate well and I walked a lot. I started working out more after I lost the weight.

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              • #8
                I lost 100 lbs from June 2010 to June 2011 (max at 310, lowest at 200). I went primal in June and lost another 10, but have since gained it back. I started getting really back depression in January and the weight quit coming off around May. My testosterone hit the floor over the summer and my thyroid is dead. I'm currently seeing and endo for possible pituitary problems. I'm glad you posted this article, because I think I may have messed up my hormones with my drastic weight loss. I am now slowly putting on weight again, no energy or desire to workout, no sex drive, episodes of severe depression. It really sucks. I hope science can figure out why this happens, and how to fix it. I'm eating a whole foods and nearly paleo, full primal diet. 21 years old, no smoking, light drinker. I shouldn't be having these issues.

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                • #9
                  I'd highly recommend Good Calories, Bad Calories by Gary Taubes, it discusses these issues at length. Patients can be put on a diet of 800 calories per day of only protein and fat (meat), and lose weight rapidly without experiencing any significant hunger or issues, with a success rate (defined as losing 40 lbs or more) of 50%. Take that exact same diet, add 400 calories of fruits and vegetables, and patients will experience crippling hunger and the success rate drops to 1%.

                  The issue is fat metabolism. In a properly functioning lean person, the body will temporarily store fat to be used for energy, and let it back out just as quickly to be burned when energy is needed. In an obese or overweight person, the body is unwilling to release that fat back into the body to be burned, even in a caloric deficit. Hence, hunger, lethargy, and no significant weight loss. Low carb diets work by curing the bodies metabolism and freeing up the stored fat to be burned for energy, which allows you to feel full and energetic while losing weight. A properly functioning metabolism will respond to an excess of calories by burning them off as heat or physical activity.

                  Weight can be lost on CW type diets of course, but people almost always experience hunger and struggle to keep the weight off. Hearing what these people force themselves to do to maintain their weight is just depressing. I've never been overweight, so I can't say too much, but I've maintained a very low weight effortlessly by eating a lot of meat and fat and minimizing my carb intake, without significant exercise. I wish I could see some of those folks give it a try to see how their bodies respond.

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                  • #10
                    Thank you for posting this. Hormones play such a huge role in weight management and with all of the chemicals (ie hormones) present not only in our foods but in our daily environments, it's no surprise hormone levels are getting so warped. Having PCOS I have struggled against people's biased judgments against me because I'm overweight. My testosterone levels are all screwed up and I don't even ovulate like a normal woman. But you know what? Primal living gives me hope every day and I'm so dedicated to sharing the message with other hormone-impaired/disordered people. This can change. So many of us are living proof.
                    Lindsay Groks On

                    "Be careful about reading health books. You may die of a misprint."
                    -- Mark Twain

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                    • #11
                      There's a rebuttle/petition written by Gary Taubes for this article here: Petition Letter to the Editor of the New York Times, in response to "The Fat Trap" (Jan 1, 2012)
                      Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                      • #12
                        I've lost 40 lbs and kept it off for a year. I know I would have gained all or some back had I not changed the way I eat, the way I think and feel about food. I know my hormones were/are messed up, before, during and after weight loss, but the body strives to be well and balanced so I have faith that if I give it proper fuel and movement, and monitor a few lab results... it'll all work out.
                        There's a crack inside of everything, that's how the light gets in. ~Leonard Cohen
                        Journal, From Sick to Fit: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread45653.html

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                        • #13
                          There's also this: The Fat Trap: My Response - Refuse To Regain

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                          • #14
                            Thanks for mentioning my response. What most annoys me about The Fat Trap and other similar articles is the assumption that figuring out how to eat well is awful, painful, unsustainable and almost unAmerican. In fact, those who are comfortable with some form of primal diet, or other genetically consistent eating style, seem very free, happy and out from under the control of the SAD. it's all propaganda that seems to me aimed at defending the eating habits of those who can't break free.

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