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Is the body affected by the "impression" of sugar?

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  • Is the body affected by the "impression" of sugar?



    I don't really know what I'm saying here but I DO know what I'm trying to say... so please bear with me:


    If I decide to put 1/4 of a tsp. of sugar in my morning coffee, does my body read only the calories, or is there something "metaphysical" in the "impression" of sweetness that signals some psychological ju-ju in my metabolism that does much more harm than the 8 calories I've just eaten?


    Which leads me to Splenda and other sweeteners that go bump in the night: Theoretically there's minimal calories, in them but what if there's more going on in my body than just the "calories in, calories out" equation?


  • #2
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    That's a good question that I've been wondering about, too. The only "20%" that I allow myself are the 2 cubes of sugar I put in my morning coffee. I calculated that if this is the only sugar I use, in one year I will have consumed 4 lbs of sugar. That was a little scary, until I learned the average American consumes about 2 to 3 lbs. per week.


    Still, I'm wondering about the effect of even a little sugar, outside of the caloric question.

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    • #3
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      I dont have the articles/quotes in front of me, but those more knowledgeable than me have stated that the "taste" of anything sweat regardless of the caloric context (i.e. sugar vs splenda etc) CAN but not always elicit an insulin response.

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      • #4
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        And I've read that eating splenda and diet drinks etc cause you to crave more carbs/sugars as your brain is getting mixed signals.

        The more I see the less I know for sure.
        -John Lennon

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        • #5
          1



          I personally don't believe in this level of mind-body connection. I put stevia in my coffee because I like sweetened coffee. I seriously doubt it causes an insulin response, because there is no sugar in my bloodstream.


          This is tantamount to saying that the digestive system kicks into gear when you merely think about eating food. It just doesn't work that way.

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          • #6
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            <pavlov?>

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            • #7
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              I too have read about the body reacting to the flavor of sweetness. Both that the body does actually start to release insulin when the taste of sweetness is present, and that if your body feels cheated (it tasted something sweet but didn&#39;t actually get the "payoff"), it will then start to crave sweetness even more in an effort to actually GET the sugar.


              It was some time ago when I read these things, so I can&#39;t remember where. So it&#39;s possible it&#39;s a load of BS.

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              • #8
                1



                "feels cheated" isn&#39;t probably the right phrase to use though. haha.


                I think the biological mechanism of "feeling cheated" would be an insulin response, but not much glucose in the blood stream, so then your body wants/needs real sugar so it can have something for the insulin to deal with.

                so you get hungry, especially for carby things - fruit or whatnot.

                Eating lots but still hungry? Eat more fat. Mid-day sluggishness? Eat more fat. Feeling depressed or irritable? Eat more fat. People think you've developed an eating disorder? Eat more fat... in front of them.

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                • #9
                  1



                  This isn&#39;t my lane of knowledge, so someone more versed than me, feel free to kick me back into my corner..


                  doesn&#39;t anything sweet (including other things), release endorphins, which causes the PFC to dump dopamine, which spikes adrenaline, which tells the liver to let some glucose out..thus spiking Blood Sugar?


                  This depends on MANY different things, but it makes sense, as mentioned above (pavlov).


                  We want the sweetness for its effects..

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                  • #10
                    1



                    Then I also wonder about chefs and people who are around food all the time. What happens to the mechanics of metabolism when they smell marinated salmon on a hot grill... warm icing dripping into the crevices of a cinnamon bun... butter and brown sugar bubbling in full flagrante delicto... what do these smells tell your brain and what does your brain tell the rest of your body? If you look with lust on a hot fudge sundae, have you already committed something that adulterates your ability to lose weight?

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                    • #11
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                      I think the chefs are busy concentrating on cooking the food. If they stood around focusing all their attention on the smell of the food it would probably cause them to salivate.

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                      • #12
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                        There is some since to this, back in college we were discussing the latest research where the took a group of individuals and measured their blood sugar after looking at donuts. Blood sugar raised.

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                        • #13
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                          [quote]

                          Then I also wonder about chefs and people who are around food all the time. What happens to the mechanics of metabolism when they smell marinated salmon on a hot grill... warm icing dripping into the crevices of a cinnamon bun... butter and brown sugar bubbling in full flagrante delicto... what do these smells tell your brain and what does your brain tell the rest of your body? If you look with lust on a hot fudge sundae, have you already committed something that adulterates your ability to lose weight? </blockquote>


                          I&#39;d REALLY like to know about this too. I&#39;m currently working in a restaurant, surrounded by steak, ribs, pulled pork, sweet potatoes, fries, and every other yummy food you can think of at a steakhouse. Some of those foods smell SO GOOD.


                          One surprising thing though. I&#39;ve IFed breakfast and lunch several days over the last couple of weeks, so that I&#39;m at the final hours while I&#39;m at the restaurant. I&#39;ve had practically no temptation to eat even though I&#39;m surrounded by all that food. I have more temptation to eat right now, first thing in the morning, than I would have at 8:00 tonight, looking at food.


                          On a similar note, I noticed a hunger-dampening effect of smelling sweet smells. I have a couple candles that smell like cupcakes and vanilla, and some cotton candy perfume. A good whif of these generally dampens my appetite some. It would be interesting to know if it&#39;s just me, or if it&#39;s biological, and if so, why.


                          Lastly, I&#39;ve been tempted to add trident gum to my daytime IFing- party to relieve the yucky mouth feeling I sometimes get, and partly to quell boredom. It&#39;s technically sugar/carb-free, but would the sugar alcohols interrupt ketosis?

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                          • #14
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                            "There is some since to this, back in college we were discussing the latest research where the took a group of individuals and measured their blood sugar after looking at donuts. Blood sugar raised."


                            I&#39;d like to actually read this study (not someone&#39;s interpretation of it) and other studies that look specifically at this phenomenon. That is the only way I could ever be convinced.

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                            • #15
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                              I think definitely. Sugar is addictive. If I eat it in the morning (not just sugar, any carbs), I don&#39;t just digest and forget about it. I want more of the same a few hrs later.

                              Alternatively if I eat meat in the morning, I don&#39;t want more because I&#39;m satiated, and I don&#39;t want sugar.

                              If I eat nothing, basically the same as if I eat meat.


                              Putting sugar in my coffee would not go over well

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