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  • Does anyone here smoke cigarettes?



    ...has anyone else quit smoking? how did you do it and how long has it been?


    if you're still a smoker, do you want to quit in the near future?


    cheers


  • #2
    1



    Paneristi I used to be a heavy smoker for around 10 years. I know that what hooked me up to nicotine wasn't only the obvious physical addiction I had to it, but also the routine.


    I decided to go cold-turkey before a 6 hour flight and take advantage of both the 15 days of a foreign environment and the lack of routine associated to them. And it worked. It wasn't easy, but I wasn't exposed to routinary things I used to associate with smoking, which definitively helped.

    “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
    "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
    "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

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    • #3
      1



      SerialSinner


      Routine? You mean the craving wasnt the hardest part but that its just 'habitual' ? ie thinking you need one verses actually addiction...how many days before the worst part was over?

      Comment


      • #4
        1



        I smoked for 10+ years also.


        If you can get through the first three days you should be ok. Go stay with a friend for a weekend or get someone at home to be your support person so you can whine to them, but they won't let you smoke.

        The "Seven Deadly Sins"

        • Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . • Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . .• Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
        • Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . • Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . • Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
        • Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

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        • #5
          1



          Paneristi, while the cravings perpetually lingered in the background during the first week, I experienced very strong craving peaks during and after the week while doing things that reminded me of smoking.


          For example, sitting in a cafe and giving the first sip to a cup of coffee. Or sitting at home after arriving from work. This is what makes us cave into smoking again regardless of the nicotine levels in the blood, hence the benefits of breaking the routine.

          “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
          "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
          "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

          Comment


          • #6
            1



            SerialSinner and Tarlac :


            Gave up from 2000 -2009 when I quit alcohol...then started again 6 weeks ago due to becoming unemployed.

            Gotta kick this fast,,,

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            • #7
              1



              Ouch, it sounds like you did the same thing that I did. I quit a ten-year smoking habit a few years ago when I quit drinking. Like you, a subsequent period of unemployment drove me back to smoking. I won't lie to you, quitting the second time can sometimes seem more challenging. However, what got me through it was remembering that I had done it once and could do it again. I also ramped up the sprint workouts when quitting for the second time; completely winding my lungs helped deter me from wanting to inhale smoke.

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              • #8
                1



                "I also ramped up the sprint workouts when quitting for the second time; completely winding my lungs helped deter me from wanting to inhale smoke"


                Been trying that - it works for about 3 hours the worst time ins the evening....must change my routine ..

                Thanks SHINE

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                • #9
                  1



                  I smoked for 16 years, I quit 8 years ago, I was going on a very long bicycle tour, fully loaded. So it wouldnt have been very good for the lungs trying to haul me and my bike up mountains still with a smoking habit. So I have to say that in the given hierarchy at that time, giving up the smoking was easy as there were so many other things to think about, next food, next camp, how long and hard the days ride etc. I was a 20 a day smoker too. I absolutely detest the smell of cigarette smoke now, even on peoples clothing.


                  So perhaps a major distraction and/or keeping busy like you would with an IF would help?

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                  • #10
                    1



                    I quit three years ago. I find that whenever I'm dealing with a habit I want to change I need to first prepare myself, by changing my subconscious. Your subconscious acts like an autopilot and wants to keep the status quo. If you are smoking, your subconscious is going to think. "Smoking is what we do." And it will look for ways to influence you. Such as, "We usually smoke after dinner, why aren't we doing that now?"


                    So, before I actually quit, I work on changing the status quo. I set a quit date two weeks out and then think everyday about how I want to have clean, healthy, lungs. I tell myself this over and over throughout the two weeks.


                    When it comes time to quit, I continue those thoughts. I also, keep in mind that it takes about 48 hours for your body to overcome the physical addiction. When the cravings hit, I do a count down and let myself know I just have x amount of hours before the physical addiction is gone. I can do this.


                    After the first 48 hours, then you just tell yourself. The physical addiction is gone. I did that. I'm going to have clean healthy lungs. I beat the the physical addiction. I can beat the mental cravings. I'm stronger than the craving.


                    I quit cold turkey, as I needed to move past the physical addiction as quickly as possible.


                    BTW. I smoked for about 12 years.


                    Also remind yourself, that smoking because your unemployed only makes your situation more stressful, because your wasting money on something that is going to kill you.

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                    • #11
                      1



                      I smoked from for 11 years. Two plus years before quitting smoking I had quit drugs and alcohol as well. I swore to never give up smoking (or coffee) since I'd quit everything else. During that time I became a daily bike rider (no car), then started mountain bike racing, and also hardcore weight-lifting. In early 96, I realized I was only smoking 3-5 cigs a week, so I just stopped buying them. I think the daily cardio/weight work that I was doing made my body change what it wanted or would accept.


                      Now, 13 years later, I still have a random craving for a smoke, but not drink or drug (15+ years). That proves to me that nicotine is worse than any hard drug you can think of. Believe me, I quit the hard stuff.


                      So, I don't know "how to" quit smoking other than suggesting that anyone can do it. Cravings can be tough as that part of your brain will want it for some time. Really, it comes down to choice. I believe that if you make the choice to stop or start something, then it can be done. Good luck with getting the smoking out of your life, and try to be thankful that you can choose to change any time you want.


                      By the way, I love the last paragraph of jpippenger's post.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        1



                        i smoked from age 15 to 28 and it's been 6.5 years since i quit. i was very similar to serialsinner in that i had very strong ties to smoking during certain activities like drinking coffee, after a nice dinner, with particular friends, with alcohol etc.


                        if you can, quit cold turkey. if you don't feel you can, then maybe my experience will help.


                        i decided i needed to start tackling each of those habits as milestones. so i started with my morning coffee. i used to have a cigarette soon after waking up, then have coffee and more cigs. so i decided each day for a week i was going to wait one extra hour before having a cigarette until i managed to enjoy my morning coffee without a cig and next thing i knew it was lunchtime. i felt free of cravings in the mornings and by conquering that first habit i felt empowered. it was easy then to go another week by increasing one more hour each day until i was only having a few cigs in the evenings, usually with a drink and after dinner.


                        the last habit of drinking and smoking was the hardest for me. i spent a few weeks not going out with friends to bars, esp. if they smoked. and eventually i was able to separate smoking and drinking. they did not have to go together.


                        once that happened, it just came down to one thing. making a choice. i decided i no longer wanted to smoke. i didn't want to smell bad. i wanted food and wine to taste better. i wanted to prove i could do it. i wanted to set an example for my friends. and the list went on so that i had no option but to follow through with my choice. if i smoked, it was because i was choosing to do it and that was no longer acceptable.


                        good luck! you are fighting a tough addiction but it is so worth it.

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                        • #13
                          1



                          Paneristi - I gave up alcohol in 2000 as well!


                          <high 5>

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                          • #14
                            1



                            Thanks everyone...ok

                            DAY ONE


                            Thanks for all your support - will log my progress

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                            • #15
                              1



                              Congratulations Paneriti. Remember, after the first day it's all downhill, do if you make it 'till tomorrow night, the worst part is over.


                              Tip: try to carry a water bottle with you all the time, and if you have a cravings peak, drink water like there's no tomorrow, and then go and fill it again. Keeps you busy and distracts your mind from the cravings.


                              Don't let it beat you!

                              “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
                              "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
                              "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

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