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Heard an alternative to cooking the whole bird

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  • Heard an alternative to cooking the whole bird

    Hi All,

    I might be a little late for this, but my favorite butcher told me that instead of cooking the entire bird (pain in the neck), he puts his stuffing down on the pan and then chops the bird up into pieces and lays the pieces on top of the stuffing. Then he roasts it.

    Sound like a really good alternative than fighting with that great big giant bird.

    -T

  • #2
    Here's another take on that where you cut out the backbone: It's 2014 and Spatchcocking Is Still the Fastest, Easiest, Best Way to Roast a Turkey | Serious Eats
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

    B*tch-lite

    Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by JoanieL View Post
      Hi Joaniel,

      Fascinating! Thank you for sharing.

      Save the back (and possibility the wing tips) for broth.

      -T

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      • #4
        I spatchcocked last year and doing it again this year. It was the most delicious bird I've ever eaten!

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        • #5
          With duck and chicken I go ahead & remove the keelbone as well, laying the two halves yin-yang in the pan. Definitely cooks faster, and the spine is a welcome bonus in the next stockpot.
          37//6'3"/185

          My peculiar nutrition glossary and shopping list

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          • #6
            I'm a spatchcock poultry cooker as well. Usually with turkey I try and have the butcher do it because they have the knives for it. This year I forgot and had to hack it myself. All in all the taste and reduced cooking time makes it a win. Also easier to carve it up.

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            • #7
              i think so,spatchcocked last year and doing it again this year. It was the most delicious bird I've ever eaten!

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              • #8
                I'm going a step further and doing two separate recipes from Serious Eats/Kenji this year:

                Sous-Vide Turkey Breast With Crispy Skin | Serious Eats : Recipes
                Red-Wine Braised Turkey Legs | Serious Eats : Recipes

                It was a good deal of work, but I think it's worth it for a special occasion. I did a spatchcocked bird a couple years ago and it was great too. And a lot less work.

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                • #9
                  It was only 3 of us so I deboned the breast and thighs, froze the legs and wings and used the bones to make a delicious gelatinous stock. I always dry brine the meat a day before cooking (just salt liberally with Kosher salt). I cooked the turkey parts on top of the suffing, it came out super moist and tender. Hubby and son thought it was the best turkey ever.
                  Life is death. We all take turns. It's sacred to eat during our turn and be eaten when our turn is over. RichMahogany.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by JoanieL View Post
                    Hadn't heard of this, will try it...thanks!
                    Age 55, post-menopausal, primal since August '12 with some dairy, lots of seafood, following PHD and the 5 Leptin Rules. Taking ThyroGold, eating RS and zero wheat with great results. My Primal Journal

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Energy! View Post
                      Hadn't heard of this, will try it...thanks!
                      Try it with chicken first, simple cheaper test method for you. Works really well in a cast iron pan with garlic cloves, salt pepper rosemary. Chicken under brick!

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