Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Need Help with Recipe

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Need Help with Recipe

    I'm a total newb to cooking , and I thought I would try to start with something simple like the Mashed Parsnips recipe from Mark's cookbook.

    So I have a couple of questions for this "simple" recipe:
    1. Is chicken broth the same thing as chicken stock?
    1a. I assume I don't want the fat free variety?
    1b. Any particular brand which is good, I picked up a Swansons
    2. Is "cream" the same as "heavy whipping cream"? (Because I went to the store and I could not find anything which just said "cream")
    2a. Do I want the ultra-pasteurized variety? I picked up an organic pasteurized heavy whipping cream in a bottle, hope I bought the right stuff.

    Thanks in advance,
    -Grok

  • #2
    You want broth. Stock is basically flavored water. Broth has been simmered with bones and meat.

    Ideally, you want to make your own. But, in a pinch, I usually buy organic broth, low sodium if I can get it. To reduce the salt content though, throw in half a potato and it will suck up the salt (then discard).

    The difference between cream/heavy whipping cream is the amount of fat. Cream is anywhere from 13-18% and heavy cream is more like 35%

    You will only find pasteurized in store. That means that its been heated to a certain temperature to kill all the potential germs (and unfortunately the good enzymes and other bacteria that are beneficial to us).
    SW: 235
    CW:220
    Rough start due to major carb WD.

    MWF: 1 hour run/walk, 1.5 hours in the gym - upper/lower and core
    Sat/Sun=Yard/house work, chasing kids, playing
    Family walk every night instead of everyone vegging in front of the TV
    Personal trainer to build muscle mass & to help meet goals

    Comment


    • #3
      Okay, I didn't see anything that said "cream". I saw the heavy whipping cream, and some half/half, and milk. I looked in two different stores.

      Comment


      • #4
        Heavy whipping cream is just fine.

        I like low sodium Kitchen Basics for my chicken stock. I use it all the time instead of wine to deglaze pans and make quick sauces.

        Comment


        • #5
          Stock and broth are used fairly interchangeably in recipes... I've always heard that "broth" is made without bones, so it doesn't get that thick texture that stock has. I usually use a bouillon powder or a soup base (a thick paste-like stuff in a jar) for convenience, if I haven't made any homemade stock recently.

          At my store there's usually "light cream" and "heavy whipping cream." When a recipe calls for "cream" I don't really know what they mean... I generally use the HWC just because that's all I ever buy. I think the ultra-pasteurized is processed with higher heat but for a shorter time than the normal pasteurized stuff. I've been meaning to do some research to figure out which is better.
          "mayness, you need to have a siggy line that says "Paleo Information Desk" or something!" -FMN <3

          I'm blogging again, at least a little bit.

          Comment


          • #6
            Okay, I've been studying the cook book a little more and in the Enchiladas recipe he calls for "half & half or cream" and the picture shows some half & half. Then in the Creamed Kale recipe he calls for "heavy cream" and shows a picture of a bottle of what looks like the stuff I bought. So I'm guessing for the Mashed Parsnips recipe I should probably use half & half if I can't find cream.

            Thanks for all your help, I think I'm going to try using some half & half for this recipe first.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by elorajade View Post
              You want broth. Stock is basically flavored water. Broth has been simmered with bones and meat.
              See, I was taught that it was the reverse- stock is made with bones and broth is not. Some googling has told me that some people also claim the difference is that stock is unsalted and broth is salted.

              As far as the cream goes, don't worry too hard about it. You could likely sub 1/2 and 1/2 or heavy whipping cream or even whole milk if that was all you had. The recipe wouldn't be identical, but it would probably still taste great.

              Comment


              • #8
                LOL!

                Thats why I just make my own when at all possible. When I buy it, it comes in tetra packs and is liquid, broth that is. Yet when I get stock concentrate, its either dry in cubes or a potent liquid.

                Broth via Wiki http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broth

                chicken stock http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicken_stock

                I think Wiki is confused too.

                Although, it has this to say:

                United States cooking schools often differentiate between broth, usually made from portions of animal meat, and stock often made from vegetable scraps and bones.
                6 of 1, half dozen of the other it seems.
                SW: 235
                CW:220
                Rough start due to major carb WD.

                MWF: 1 hour run/walk, 1.5 hours in the gym - upper/lower and core
                Sat/Sun=Yard/house work, chasing kids, playing
                Family walk every night instead of everyone vegging in front of the TV
                Personal trainer to build muscle mass & to help meet goals

                Comment


                • #9
                  Easy way to make broth

                  I think I have avoided Swansons broth in the past because it has MSG. Very unprimal IMO. And lots of people find MSG to be allergy-inducing.

                  One good way to make broth is to buy a rotisserie chicken (preferably organic) and then once you've eaten it, put the whole carcass in a pot of water (about 6-8 qts) with some garlic and onion and simmer for a few hours on low. Season with sea salt and pepper if it needs it You can just use big chunks of onions, you don't really have to chop them. When it's done you strain the broth (keeping all the chicken bits that fall off the bone) and divide it into smaller portions to freeze for later use. Then when you get a recipe calling for broth you're good to go!
                  Mermaid

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    When I make stock, I take the bones of the chicken (or beef bones, like from beef ribs) toss them in the oven and roast them with the veg that I will be putting in the stock. I also save the juices the chicken made as well as the veg I roasted it on. I usually roast the bones/veg for about an hour or so at 350. Dump the whole shooting match in my big stock pot (12 qt, although I would LOVE a 15-20 qt) and cover with water. I leave the skins on the onions and garlic, and the yellow onion skins give the stock a nice color. I add a good glug or 2 of apple cider vinegar and let sit for 1 hour. Bring to a boil and skim skim skim the yuck that comes to the top--and add in a bay leaf or 2, some peppercorns, thyme... I reduce the heat, and let simmer for anywhere from 24-48 hours. When the ends of the bones fall apart when pressed it is done. What that means, is you have gotten all the nutrients you can from the bones. I decant and chill and then package in 1 cup and 1 quart containers. You can, after taking all the solids out, boil the stock to reduce the amount and then it will be just more concentrated.

                    I never pick my bones clean, and I usually toss in a package of wings or feet (if I can find them) for the extra cartilage for the gel factor. I never salt the stock/broth until I use it.
                    Every day is another stitch in the quilt of life.
                    ~*~*~*~*~*~*~
                    Re-Start date 6/23/2011
                    me--Post pregnancy --mama to a beautiful baby boy--
                    273.4/269.3/115
                    Hubby--230/227.8/165

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Stock is the culinary world term....Broth is the home cook term. Both are the same.

                      Don't buy anything ultra pasteurized.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Stock is made from mostly bones and veg. Broth is more meat--such as boiling a whole chicken for soup. Stock is also cooked for a much longer time, several hours to over night or a couple days. Broth is for a shorter amount of time, say, 2-3 hours at most. Stock is used for sauces, broth for soups/stews. Stock tends to be darker in color, broth lighter in color. Course this is discussing chicken/beef stock. Fish stock, a different animal entirely.
                        Every day is another stitch in the quilt of life.
                        ~*~*~*~*~*~*~
                        Re-Start date 6/23/2011
                        me--Post pregnancy --mama to a beautiful baby boy--
                        273.4/269.3/115
                        Hubby--230/227.8/165

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Careful, I picked up some heavy whipping cream once, only to discover when I got home that it had added sugar in it.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I checked the store again today and next to the heavy whipping cream was some normal whipping cream, so I picked up some of that. Now to make some mashed parsnips!

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X