Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Roasting a big batch of vegetables for the week?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Roasting a big batch of vegetables for the week?

    I was thinking on roasting up a huge batch of vegetables once a week - Onions, Peppers, Tomatoes, Sweet potato, cucumbers, and bagging them to snack on during the week, what's the best way to go about this?

    Plan was to roast them in the oven with a bit of olive oil and bag them/container in a few different containers and put them in the fridge. I read that I should splash a little bit of vinegar on them to help preserve it?

    Should I warm them up in the microwave when I eat them? Or should I eat them cold? Does the microwave make a difference?

    Tips/ideas, anything ive left out ?

  • #2
    Eating a bag of week old cooked vegetables, warmed up or cold, sounds very unpleasant. You may also get things like mold toxins or decay. I'd suggest cooking a batch of vegetables every few days instead so they are fresher. You can also change things up for more variety that way.

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app

    Comment


    • #3
      I love roasted vegetables but IME it's fresh or bust since texture doesn't last long before they turn to mush. Whole sweet potatoes are okay to reheat in the microwave if you lightly rubbed the skin with fat before roasting to block evaporation.

      IMO better vegetable prep would be culturing/pickling, soup that is stored airtight, or raw crudité/salads. Infinite flavor options there.
      37//6'3"/185

      My peculiar nutrition glossary and shopping list

      Comment


      • #4
        my b/f likes sauteed mushrooms with his morning eggs, so i cook up a big batch once or twice a week to save a.m. time each day. they hold just fine, as do sauteed onions and peppers. i reheat them gently with a bit of oo or butter before adding the eggs.

        well-roasted veggies will get soggy after a few days, so it's up to you if the texture will bum you out or not.
        As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

        – Ernest Hemingway

        Comment


        • #5
          I actually do roast veggies once a week so I don't have to do too much veggie prepping when i come home from work during the weekdays.
          I think the pre-roasting works best w/the firmer vegetables like carrots or even cauliflower. I've done it with zucchini, asparagus, and onions. I will roast a big batch and just take out a portion, pop them in the toaster oven or even pan fry them in a little fat.
          “One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.”

          ― Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by bullymama View Post
            I think the pre-roasting works best w/the firmer vegetables like carrots or even cauliflower. I've done it with zucchini, asparagus, and onions.
            This. I wouldn't roast tomatoes that I wasn't eating immediately and I wouldn't roast cucumbers, period.

            If you're going to mix it up, make sure the cooking times jive - brussels sprouts, asparagus, zucchini, squash, root veg (& lots if other things) all roast well, but not necessarily together. Toss with oil & seasoning of choice (bacon grease + hot peppers & garlic = YUM)... I'll usually eat some fresh/hot and store the rest in a glass airtight container (for probably 4-7 days? If the smell/taste or texture change, it's time to toss ) in the fridge...

            Leftovers can be eaten cold, room temp, or heated up (I don't microwave often, but microwaved real food is better than any kind of junk food).

            Comment


            • #7
              I always like to have roasted veggies in the fridge. They come in handy to toss in salads, soups, or to eat warm or cold as a side dish. I eat some most mornings as an under-layer for sardines, salmon, HB eggs, etc. They don't usually last a whole week...except for the roasted beets (washed, wrapped whole in foil, 1 hour at 400°F, let them sit and cool off before donning gloves to push off the skin.) I can only eat so many beets at one sitting and hubby hates them, so a splash of vinegar keeps them from spoiling.

              Below are some other favs. I drizzle on olive oil and put the veggies on a foil lined pan or baking sheet and often add various spices. Cooking time varies with the hardess and size of the pieces. The temp is usually 375 or 400°F (depends on what else is cooking) and the pieces are turned over or stirred halfway through. Most take from 20-30 minutes. I like to put vignaigrette on many of them before storing in the fridge. However, vinegar can turn some like green beans a dull green.

              Asparagus cut into bite-sized pieces takes about 15-20 minutes at 375°F. Good with mushrooms and garlic.
              Okra- cut in half lengthwise, done in 15 minutes or less
              Carrots- cut in thirds or fourths, slice as needed to make pieces similar in size
              Sweet potato- peel if desired, slice into rounds about 1/2 inch thick
              Eggplant- cube and sprinkle with curry powder or cut into 3/4 inch thick rounds
              Mushrooms- leave whole or cut into similar size pieces. (Shiritakis roast in about 15 minutes and are firmer than button type.)
              Mix- bell peppers, summer squash, onions, garlic cloves, mushrooms

              Have fun!
              Last edited by Energy!; 04-29-2014, 03:28 AM.
              Age 55, post-menopausal, primal since August '12 with some dairy, lots of seafood, following PHD and the 5 Leptin Rules. Taking ThyroGold, eating RS and zero wheat with great results. My Primal Journal

              Comment


              • #8
                Roasting a big batch of vegetables for the week?

                Pick hearty ones and I would eat them cold dressed with olive oil. Certain veg won't work (my very expensive asparagus turned to mush ;C ), and I find reheating makes them mushier. Carrots, parsnips, beets, cabbage, potato, green beans, pumpkin, eggplant, and peppers are all good.

                Comment


                • #9
                  If a veggie turns to mush, it was roasted too long and/or at too high a temp. Remove a piece from the pan and test it midway to see how it's doing. Or, you may prefer certain veggies more crunchy, which is fine.
                  Age 55, post-menopausal, primal since August '12 with some dairy, lots of seafood, following PHD and the 5 Leptin Rules. Taking ThyroGold, eating RS and zero wheat with great results. My Primal Journal

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    My personal favourites are pumpkin (ie summer squash) and beetroot roasted in a little tallow and olive oil and drizzled with some balsamic vinegar.

                    Don't forget the ordinary potato though! The Definitive Guide to Resistant Starch | Mark's Daily Apple

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Just roasted a good amount of veg and bagged it in the freezer, will roast it again under the grill when I need it. I love roasted veg, did leek, zucchini, onions, peppers. I like roasted tomatoes as well, but wasn't sure how it will hold.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        At the beginning of each week I chop cherry tomatoes, red bell peppers, and zucchini and put the mixture in tupperware fresh in my fridge. Then when I need it, say to mix with eggs in the morning or for a veggie mix at dinner, I either quickly sauté or roast them, and if I'm really struggling for time I pop them in the microwave for 30 seconds and you've got cooked veggies! Roasted or steamed asparagus usually stays edible for me for about 4 days too so that's a good option I've found.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Energy! View Post
                          If a veggie turns to mush, it was roasted too long and/or at too high a temp. Remove a piece from the pan and test it midway to see how it's doing. Or, you may prefer certain veggies more crunchy, which is fine.
                          exactly! the trick is to no over cook them. especially onions and mushrooms. keep them a little under cooked so reheating will fix that and they keep better. a week would be a bit much but doable.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X