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  • Leftover Safety

    I am really mad at myself! On Thanksgiving afternoon my cousin did a beautiful job frying a turkey. I asked for the bones and joints and golden skin while it was being sliced for the platter and brought them home and put them in the extra refrigerator in the garage.... Where they are -STILL!

    Before I follow my first instinct, which is to toss the bag, I wondered if anyone thinks they might still be ok to use for bone broth.

  • #2
    Throw it away. Not primal to eat potentially toxic things. :-S
    ------
    HCLF: lean red meat, eggs, low-fat dairy, bone broth/gelatin, fruits, seafood, liver, small amount of starch (oatmeal, white rice, potatoes, carrots), small amount of saturated fat (butter/ghee/coconut/dark chocolate/cheese).

    My Journal: gelatin experiments, vanity pictures, law school rants, recipe links


    Food blog: GELATIN and BONE BROTH recipes

    " The best things in life are free and the 2nd best are expensive!" - Coco Chanel

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    • #3
      Thanks for the feedback! I am very conscious ( too much so per my husband) of time limits on leftovers etc.

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      • #4
        Too long, throw it out. Some people, specifically the militant Bulletproof diet people and people who are concerned about mycotoxins, would say not to eat leftovers at all. I say that within a few days they are probably fine, depending on what it is and how it is stored of course, but I wouldn't want to eat something that is starting to get old and might taste bad of have high levels of something unpleasant growing in it. Even if you heat it enough to kill anything that may be on it, after a certain point they have done their damage, and killing them can't reverse that.

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        • #5
          I would toss it too.

          I'm generally in the 3-4 days camp, depending on what kind of leftovers we're talking, but it has been longer than that and it's not worth taking the risk.
          Durp.

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          • #6
            Extending this - and trying to save starting a whole new thread - what are peoples views on Best Before Dates? Specifically meat? Say I had a steak or chicken that went off today (5th dec) how long after the BBE would you still cook it? And how long on top of that until you eat it?
            UK PBer

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            • #7
              I've been known to leave it a day or two past expiry, I would then cook it thoroughly (no rareness) and serve piping hot straight away, preferably no leftovers. Never made us sick.

              As for those above, I couldn't smell your turkey but it was already cooked and was stored in the fridge for less than a week. I think unless it actually looked and smelled bad I would have made the broth. But I can see I'm outvoted and you've probably ditched it by now. Too bad.
              Annie Ups the Ante
              http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread117711.html

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Annieh View Post
                I've been known to leave it a day or two past expiry, I would then cook it thoroughly (no rareness) and serve piping hot straight away, preferably no leftovers. Never made us sick.

                As for those above, I couldn't smell your turkey but it was already cooked and was stored in the fridge for less than a week. I think unless it actually looked and smelled bad I would have made the broth. But I can see I'm outvoted and you've probably ditched it by now. Too bad.
                Agreed.... cooking it for as long as you would need to to make a bone broth, or a soup, would have killed anythin that would make you ill.

                I find the expiration date issue relatively humorous...... I find it totally comical that bright, intelligent people will toss a perfectly good item just because there is a date printed on the package.... For example, an aspirin is perfectly acceptable on the date printed on the package, and the next day.... toss it, it isn't good now..... What kind of magic is this that makes a drug effective on one day and poof.... the next day, it's curing powers are reduced to dust...... laughable.

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                • #9
                  A week? Bah, I'd use it still. That's about my limit for anything though.

                  For fresh meat, I try to freeze it within a couple days of purchase. We usually use it within a couple of weeks, so I don't worry about expiration dates. I try not to have it in the fridge more than 4 days total, as it tends to go bad over that. I go by appearance & smell, not labels.
                  Depression Lies

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                  • #10
                    I usually look at something closely, and if there isn't anything growing on it (after a week there usually is), I boil it hard. Broth can be salvaged by scraping off the surface, but solid food ends up getting thrown out.

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                    • #11
                      I would have made broth out of it. I really doubt that anything bad could survive cooking the bones for 24 hrs.

                      Typically I keep stuff one week. When I worked in restaurants that was the usual cut off. But the truth is a good portion of the food would be put away W/O a label & date. So you had to rely on your nose, eyes and memory. My policy was when in doubt throw it out. But I was always more rigorous than my fellow cooks! It used to drive me crazy to see things put away w/o label & dates.

                      Spursberry, with regards to fresh meat if the date were Dec 5, I would cook it either today or marinate and cook it tomorrow.
                      Life is death. We all take turns. It's sacred to eat during our turn and be eaten when our turn is over. RichMahogany.

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                      • #12
                        I do think the smell test says a lot. Many foods either start to look or smell "off" when they go bad. And if you're heating them again pretty thoroughly that makes a difference too.

                        But I don't have insurance right now, so I'm less willing to take risks than I was when I had a $3 copay and no deductible.

                        I still remember cleaning out my ex-MIL's house after the Northridge Quake (1994) and finding medicine that had expired in 1977, so 17 years prior. As much as I adore her, that's where my kids learned to read labels very early on. She had a lot of food in her kitchen that been expired for more than a year.

                        As far as medicines go, I think most break down to basically an inert state. Obviously not a week or even a month after they expire, but eventually. Tetracycline is the only one I know of that actually becomes toxic, not that I'm a fan of it anyway.
                        Durp.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by namelesswonder View Post
                          A week? Bah, I'd use it still. That's about my limit for anything though.

                          For fresh meat, I try to freeze it within a couple days of purchase. We usually use it within a couple of weeks, so I don't worry about expiration dates. I try not to have it in the fridge more than 4 days total, as it tends to go bad over that. I go by appearance & smell, not labels.
                          +1.....I'm in the "bah I'd still use it" category as well. It was in the fridge right? If they don't smell awful then I'd use em.

                          I can guarantee I've eaten worse . Slightly off food isn't the worst thing in the world if its "paleo" types food. If we are talking a sour can of beans then all bets are off obviously.
                          Last edited by Neckhammer; 12-05-2013, 12:39 PM.

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                          • #14
                            We're just finishing off the last of our turkey and I made broth tonight. Nothing smells off and I'll be making turkey soup for this week, so I'm not worried.

                            I'm a fan of the smell test, though I do like to stick to a 4 day window as a typical rule (not that most food lasts that long in my fridge anyways).
                            "The grand essentials of happiness are: something to do, something to love and something to hope for." - Allan K. Chalmers (1759-1834)

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Urban Forager View Post
                              I would have made broth out of it. I really doubt that anything bad could survive cooking the bones for 24 hrs.

                              Typically I keep stuff one week. When I worked in restaurants that was the usual cut off. But the truth is a good portion of the food would be put away W/O a label & date. So you had to rely on your nose, eyes and memory. My policy was when in doubt throw it out. But I was always more rigorous than my fellow cooks! It used to drive me crazy to see things put away w/o label & dates.

                              Spursberry, with regards to fresh meat if the date were Dec 5, I would cook it either today or marinate and cook it tomorrow.
                              Cool - thats pretty much what I do, although I have been known to allow a day before (i.e cook on the evening of the 6th)
                              UK PBer

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