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Tips for backpacking food?

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  • Tips for backpacking food?

    Hi All,

    Any tips for good food to take/make while on a 5-day backpacking trip? Goes without saying that I won't have refrigeration and keeping things light is ideal. In the past, I used to use those Lipton sides. While they worked great at the end of the day, I don't dare put that stuff in my body any more.

    Current thoughts:
    • Jerkey
    • Dried fruit
    • Hard boiled eggs (first 2-3 days)
    • Pouches of tuna or salmon
    • Nuts/seeds (can get heavy)
    • Almond butter
    • Salami or pepperoni (first 3 days)
    • Hard cheese


    As it turns out, I seem to be leaning toward non-cooking foods. If that's the case, I certainly won't mind leaving the stove and fuel can home. I, however, would love a hot meal, but am not sure what will work well.

    Many thanks for any tips!
    My blog: Regular Guy Paleo and please feel free to "like" my Facebook page.

  • #2
    I'm a stoveless backpacker. I do add in carbs on my trips, because its just easier to get the required calories. For breakfast its usually some Starbucks Via cold, and a Probar. Superfruit Slam or Superberries and Greens. I snack during the day instead of having a set lunch time. Trail mix/GORP, larabars, jerky, dried fruit, etc. Dinner is salami or pepperoni and hard cheese, almond butter and jelly on a whole wheat bagel or tortilla, dehydrated beans and rice with fritos on tortilla, more jerky and cheese, etc. If you have a dehydrator, you can make your own sweet potato bark and add some dried meat. Also check out Packit Gourmet. They sell gluten free meals that are amazing, and many can be rehydrated with cold water. I don't miss a hot meal at all. If its cold I can be bundled up in my sleeping bag, munching on food instead of sitting out in the cold waiting on water to boil. And if its hot, I don't want hot mush anyway. Oh, and never forget the power of a Snickers bar!!! Walking 20 miles a day burns an amazing amount of calories and its hard to beat the calorie per ounce and yummy factor of Snickers. Its not healthy, its not Primal, but it sure hits the spot!

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    • #3
      You can still do rice. Soak raw rice it while you are hiking, then it will cook up much quicker.

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      • #4
        Thanks! I certainly don't mind a few things non-primal while burning obscene amounts of calories. My main reason for staying primal out there, however, is that I'd like to avoid any GI upset that may ensue after a tasty indulgence. Sometimes happens at home, and I'd hate to encounter a bout while on the trail. No fun!

        Thanks, eKatherine. I've been thinking about some rice possibilities, as well. Might be a good vehicle for getting my EVOO.
        My blog: Regular Guy Paleo and please feel free to "like" my Facebook page.

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        • #5
          The only problem with a lot of the stuff on your list is that is is hydrated so you have to lug a lot of water weight with you. I wonder how many ounces per day you'll have to carry. I haven't been backpacking for years...

          Properly dry cured sausages should last a lot longer than 3 or 4 days even in the sumer. Try to find some Spanish chorizo or salchichon.

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          • #6
            Hormel's Natural pepperoni doesn't require refrigeration until you open the pack...and they're packaged in sizes that are reasonable for a meal (I used to eat them with cheese for my lunches quite often).
            Most people don't realize how much energy it takes for me to pretend to be normal.

            If I wanted to listen to an asshole, I'd fart.

            Twibble's Twibbly Wibbly

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            • #7
              That pepperoni sounds like a good score. Yes, the stuff on my list is on the heavy side. In my pre-primal days, I'd actually have a pretty light food bag. Of course, it mostly consisted of those $1 Lipton sides, along with peanut butter, pita bread, peanut M&Ms, instant oatmeal, etc..

              I really do enjoy cooking on the stove, but it looks like this might be my first adventure in non-cooking backpacking. Since I'm not a coffee drinker, this might make it pretty easy. I suppose no stove/fuel = I can go a little lighter or carry a few heavier foods. Gonna be missing veggies for a while, though.

              Thanks for the thoughts and tips.
              My blog: Regular Guy Paleo and please feel free to "like" my Facebook page.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Sandman View Post
                Gonna be missing veggies for a while, though.
                Hint - Gather like Grok.

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                • #9
                  I realy like it .I appericate this thread.Awesome! Thanks for that.......I certainly don't mind a few things non-primal while burning obscene amounts of calories. My main reason for staying primal out there, however, is that I'd like to avoid any GI upset that may ensue after a tasty indulgence.......


                  ______________
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                  Last edited by Brodon; 11-06-2014, 11:56 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Interesting discussion about tips for backpacking and i really appreciate to above comments, well these are very useful and informative tips, which you share with us, because, it's too much informative tips, i hope, these tips, prove helpful for me ... Keep it up guys ....

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                    • #11
                      I recently went on a 3 day backpacking trip at Dolly Sods Wilderness area in West Virginia. Campfires are allowed in existing rings, so I did not carry a stove. I had the same concern about missing my fresh veggies, so I took a few with me.

                      The fresh food was worth it, including:
                      frozen sirloin steak for first night, packed in an insulated bag with some frozen water bottles
                      foil wrapped sweet potatoes (first and second night, cooked right in coals)
                      1 cucumber
                      1 small jicama
                      some green tea bags
                      an orange or 2

                      For the remaining meals, I went with non-cook stuff, including:
                      Tanka bites
                      Macadamia nuts
                      mixed nuts
                      dried fruits, including blueberries, mangos, bananas
                      canned sardines
                      canned kippered herring
                      beef jerky
                      dark chocolate
                      Artisana macadamia / cashew nut butter packet

                      My biggest problem was in judging portions. I ate most of the fresh food, but I took at least half of the dried food.

                      The only foraging I did was for wild blueberries.

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