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What's your favourite non-primal cookbook?

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  • What's your favourite non-primal cookbook?

    Hi everyone, I've just been thumbing through "the River Cottage Meat Book" by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall and realised what a great book it is for Primal cooks.

    He covers the ethics of meat production (why we should eat pastured meat) and then describes cuts of meat followed by some amazing (and mostly Primal) recipes. This includes making stock/broth, how to make Bacon, how to eat a woodcock's intestines and so on.

    If you eat potatoes then I recommend the shepherd's pie recipe. If you don't eat potatoes then make the filling and eat it with butter-sauteed leeks and cabbage!

    So my question is what is your favourite non-Primal cookbook and why?

  • #2
    probably my local church cook books, but not because the recipes are good. like chicken fingers with crust made from crushed corn flakes, it's full of those kinds of recipes
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    yeah you are

    Baby if you time travel back far enough you can avoid that work because the dust won't be there. You're too pretty to be working that hard.
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    • #3
      Originally posted by bloodorchid View Post
      probably my local church cook books, but not because the recipes are good. like chicken fingers with crust made from crushed corn flakes, it's full of those kinds of recipes
      /facepalm

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      • #4
        I have a book on butchering called "MEAT" and one on how to make cured meats at home. Can't wait to deploy them!
        --
        Perfection is entirely individual. Any philosophy or pursuit that encourages individuality has merit in that it frees people. Any that encourages shackles only has merit in that it shows you how wrong and desperate the human mind can get in its pursuit of truth.

        --
        I get blunter and more narcissistic by the day.
        I'd apologize, but...

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        • #5
          Anything published before 1980 (I own a few) - full fat everything and all the nasty bits.

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          • #6
            I have two ...

            First, an old Mexican cookbook from the '80s when "foreign food" was still a really big deal in the UK. Second, an Icelandic cookbook from the '90s where cheesy cuisine was all the rage. Both are simple, back to basics and very much just good primal foods put on a plate.
            Paul
            http://www.pjgh.co.uk
            http://www.livingintheiceage.co.uk

            "... needs more fish!"

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            • #7
              I used to love the old Better Homes & Gardens Cookbook. That's where I learned that protein + can of cream of (fill in the blank) soup + starch = a meal most people find pleasant. I had an old dog-eared, stained paperback copy that lived with me in six states. I finally left it behind two years ago. But for the beginner, it's got how-to guides, substitution information, etc. It is in no way primal.

              And though I don't eat like this much anymore, I love recipes like this: Stuffed Burger Bundles Recipe at Epicurious.com from the above cookbook.
              "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

              B*tch-lite

              Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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              • #8
                I love raw foods cookbooks for finding crazy stuff to do with veggies.

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                • #9
                  Joanne's Flukes Baking Mysteries. Every single recipe in those books turned out just right and people rave.

                  I also do not mind the Comapny's coming cookbooks, and I live Michael Smith's Chief at Home (well, I do not have access to it for a few months now since stupid cable went digital in our city & the gym won't install it).
                  My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
                  When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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                  • #10
                    ImageUploadedByMarks Daily Apple Forum1371501181.234152.jpg
                    Too many to choose from

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                    • #11
                      "How to Cook Everything" by Mark Bittman

                      Amazon.com: How to Cook Everything (Completely Revised 10th Anniversary Edition) (9780764578656): Mark Bittman: Books

                      That and Food Network were instrumental in me learning how to cook.

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                      • #12
                        Have used this one for nearly 30 years. Lots of traditional stuff, with really good info about the hows and why's of technique. Much is still usable for primal.

                        THE French Kitchen Diane Holuigue French Cooking FOR Australians Cookbook | eBay

                        Other favourites are my collection of David Thompson Thai cookbooks, the Elizabeth David books, and a paperback called Thai Cooking Class which has really good everyday recipes.

                        I have a bookcase full and while some are great for inspiration others have just one or two favourite recipes.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Primal-V View Post
                          Hi everyone, I've just been thumbing through "the River Cottage Meat Book" by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall and realised what a great book it is for Primal cooks.
                          I just bought this book last week and am loving it. I haven't even gotten to the recipes yet. We just ordered a lamb, butchered to our specs and the book was really helpful.
                          50yo, 5'3"
                          SW-195
                          CW-125, part calorie counting, part transition to primal
                          GW- Goals are no longer weight-related

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                          • #14
                            My favorite non-primal cookbook is "Invitation to Indian Cooking", by Madhur Jaffrey. Many recipes are primal, and others are easily adapted. The nicely spiced vegetable dishes are especially pleasing: a wonderful change from my standard vegetable fare.

                            I also like "Betty Crocker Cooking Basics", not so much for the recipes as for the many cooking tips that have helped me in preparing my primal dishes.

                            Haven't delved into it yet, but while going through my mother's kitchen and dining room after she passed away last month, I found a 1956 Betty Crocker cookbook. Based on a quick glance or two, it looks like there is quite a bit of primal friendly cooking in it. Just have to avoid the dessert section. ;-)
                            Live your life and love your life. It's the only one you get.

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                            • #15
                              Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall also has a good Vegetable cookbook... and Rick Stein for fishy related adventures.

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