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  • #76
    Maybe you are thinking of barberries?

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    • #77
      Originally posted by Jenry Hennings View Post
      You could probably put in some kind of root veg in it and let it all slow cook? I'm thinking potatoes. Traditionally served with rice, so if you eat rice, that would probably go well


      Sent from my iPhone using Marks Daily Apple Forum
      I do eat rice. I was thinking of a green side dish - something along the lines of spinach .. perhaps with garlic?

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      • #78
        I can't think of anything to go better with meat and rice than a yoghurt dish,so how about spinach boorani? Simply heat some olive oil and fry garlic and spinach in it. Season with salt and pepper and mix with thick yoghurt. You can add some mint for extra deliciousness.

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        • #79
          Originally posted by Urja View Post
          I can't think of anything to go better with meat and rice than a yoghurt dish,so how about spinach boorani? Simply heat some olive oil and fry garlic and spinach in it. Season with salt and pepper and mix with thick yoghurt. You can add some mint for extra deliciousness.
          Just what I was thinking! Convenient you mentioned it, because I forgot what it was called.


          Sent from my iPhone using Marks Daily Apple Forum

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          • #80
            Must be great minds and all that :-P

            Worth noting that the spinach needs to be cooked until all liquid goes or the boorani will be watery. You can add walnuts to the dish too but with the dish you are talking about I think that would be overkill.

            Incidentally beetroot boorani made with same ingredients is amazing.

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            • #81
              Where about in the UK are you two ? I'd like to invite myself to dinner !

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              • #82
                Originally posted by alisoncapricorn View Post
                Where about in the UK are you two ? I'd like to invite myself to dinner !
                Hampshire area. As long as your not on the SO register, you're welcome


                Sent from my iPhone using Marks Daily Apple Forum

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                • #83
                  ooh thankyou ! I'll be down your way in Sept - I'll let you know

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                  • #84
                    Couldn't possibly be considered Armenian if I didn't invite strangers for dinner


                    Sent from my iPhone using Marks Daily Apple Forum

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                    • #85
                      Just bought two books which - one cookery book from the middle east

                      Honey & Co: Food from the Middle East: Amazon.co.uk: Itamar Srulovich, Sarit Packer: 9781444754674: Books

                      and one "from the ~Ukraine and beyond".

                      http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/178472038...986871_TE_item

                      Hope some of the recipes are as inspiring as the ones on this thread!!

                      Thanks, JH!!!

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                      • #86
                        I'm Sussex / Surrey borders. Not so far from Hampshire! Do you have a good source of the more unusual ingredients I might need locally??

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                        • #87
                          Originally posted by breadsauce View Post
                          I'm Sussex / Surrey borders. Not so far from Hampshire! Do you have a good source of the more unusual ingredients I might need locally??
                          I don't know any round your way, but the best bet (at the risk of stating the obvious) is to find an ethnic supermarket run by a Muslim minority. Indian or Afro Caribbean ones, whilst being a go-to source for all things coconut, tend not to have things like Barberries, or certain herbs. Dried fenugreek for example took me a while to obtain. A lot of places now sell pomegranate molasses, but if you want a 100% pomegranate ingredient list, buy it from an ethnic grocer. To be fair, you could do all your shopping from those places. Dirt cheap, and good quality.


                          Sent from my iPhone using Marks Daily Apple Forum

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                          • #88
                            Originally posted by Jenry Hennings View Post
                            I don't know any round your way, but the best bet (at the risk of stating the obvious) is to find an ethnic supermarket run by a Muslim minority. Indian or Afro Caribbean ones, whilst being a go-to source for all things coconut, tend not to have things like Barberries, or certain herbs. Dried fenugreek for example took me a while to obtain. A lot of places now sell pomegranate molasses, but if you want a 100% pomegranate ingredient list, buy it from an ethnic grocer. To be fair, you could do all your shopping from those places. Dirt cheap, and good quality.



                            Sent from my iPhone using Marks Daily Apple Forum
                            Excellent info - thanks!!!

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                            • #89
                              Originally posted by Jenry Hennings View Post
                              In all the Iranian food I've read/cooked, I've not come across a lot of recipes that call for cranberries. Which dishes do you have in mind? Pomegranate, yes, cranberries, not so much.

                              Plus, you can always omit them (unless it's a cranberry stew
                              Different styles, I guess. I was friends with an Iranian chef and she taught me some of her recipes. Every single one had cranberries in them. She made the egg-herb cake you talked about earlier in the thread with cranberries. Anyway, like you said, easy to omit, I was just poking fun for the sake of it

                              POMEGRANATES ARE LIFE.

                              Originally posted by Urja
                              Maybe you are thinking of barberries?
                              Iranian friend mentioned that back home she would use another fruit, but cranberries were the closest she could find here. I don't know what fruit it was she used originally.

                              On to the recipe sharing! This sauce is stupidly simple to make and it is really, really good. It's called "dakous" and is typically served with a lamb dish, but you can use it as sauce for grilled vegetables, rice, other meats, eggs, etc.

                              Heat 1/8th to 1/4 cup olive oil in a pan. Add 2-3 mashed cloves of garlic and 2 chopped hot pepper (dried or fresh), fry for about 2 minutes. Reduce the heat to medium, add 1kg or 2lbs of diced tomatoes (either peeled from fresh or from a can), 1 Tbs of tomato paste, salt, pepper and cinnamon, to taste. Cook partially covered for 30 minutes. You can refrigerate it for a couple of days or freeze.

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                              • #90
                                Love this thread. I'll chip in.

                                Rice (cauliflower) Pilaf

                                Cauliflower rice cooked as described in Mark's cook books.
                                1- medium onion chopped
                                4- cloves of garlic finely diced
                                1/2 red bell pepper chopped
                                1 - pinch of saffron steeped in a couple ounces of hot water
                                2- strips of orange peel
                                1- tablespoon of olive oil
                                2- tablespoons of butter
                                Salt
                                Pepper
                                Golden raisins
                                Pistachios or Pine Nuts

                                Heat oil and butter in a wide skillet over medium heat
                                Sweat onions until translucent and peppers until softened
                                Cook garlic until fragrant
                                Introduce cauliflower rice to pan
                                mix well and heat throughout
                                add saffron, water and orange peels
                                Season to taste and continue to cook until fragrant.
                                If the mixture gets too dry you can add more butter or a little chicken broth to save some calories.

                                Turn off heat, cover and let sit for a while. It's actually better the next day.

                                Tips: Depending on how large your cauliflower head is, you may need to adjust your other ingredients.

                                Top with golden raisins and your choice of nuts before serving. Delicious with kebabs!

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