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  • #61
    Your Mecca to Middle Eastern Foods.

    Originally posted by picklepete View Post
    I wish lamb and eggplants weren't such specialty items around here. I have a jar of nice zaatar I like to put to use.
    You know, I didn't realise how often I post something related to those until you just said it.. 0/10 for my creativity. I don't know why I seem to focus on those 2, maybe because for me it's convenient (as in ingredient wise, not in terms of posting)? Also you would have noticed I hardly post here, so I've pretty much forgotten what I have posted. I'll make more of an effort.
    Last edited by Jenry Hennings; 05-22-2014, 10:44 PM.

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    • #62
      Here's a change: Chicken Korma.

      This recipe is from tv chef Rick Stein and this is, by all accounts (including mine), the korma to end all kormas. Picklepete, there's no aubergine or lamb in sight! Link as follows:

      http://thehappyfoodie.co.uk/recipes/...-chicken-korma

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      • #63
        Have a hankering for a sweet taste of the Persian Empire? I recently tried a coconut based sweet called 'Loze Nargil'. Usually made to celebrate 'Nowruz', which is Iranian new years. With the distinct taste of rose-water and pistachio, it was surprisingly light. Perfect with an after dinner coffee/chai. Here's the stuff:

        2 cups coconut, shredded
        1/2 cup sugar
        1/2 cup water
        2 tablespoons coconut milk, unsweetened (I used organic)
        2-3 tablespoons rosewater
        1/8 teaspoon ground cardamom *optional
        1/2 cup pistachios, crushed

        1- Combine the sugar and water in a saucepan and bring to the boil. Makes a syrup. Leave to cool.
        2- return to a low heat, and add coconut, milk and rose water and mix til throughly combined. (I didn't use cardamom. Add here too)
        3- Pour in to a lined pan, and cover with crushed pistachio. Fridge it up, then cut in to small squares.

        Nb- if using sweetener, only dissolve the sweetener, it won't make a syrup.
        You could also try using honey if the stigma of 'sugar' is too much for you. It's intended for a treat, and the serving size is small, it's easily a workable solution for the sugar-phobic.

        Khodar Hafez!

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        • #64
          When I want something sweet .
          Halva to the rescue !!!!

          With pistachios or almonds !!!
          Easy to get carried away


          From London England UK

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          • #65
            Originally posted by Jenry Hennings View Post
            So, it took about 5 minutes before I had to post the yoghurt dip recipe..

            This is called 'Mast o Khiar' literally meaning 'yoghurt and cucumber'. It's more commonly known as Tzadziki, which is the greek name. I use the Farsi name. Basically, greek yoghurt, and finely chopped mint and cucumber. Mix. Done.
            Originally posted by Jenry Hennings View Post
            Another popular kabob recipe is 'Jujeh Kabob'. Jujeh is traditionally made with Poussin, but I'm sure I don't have to tell you that Chicken is a valid substitute? I did?! Ugh... Anyway, the secret to this is all in the marinade, of which I have 3. Two of which I've had.

            Lemon Marinade (Traditional, and my favorite):
            -Juice of 2 lemons,
            -Finely Grated Onion
            -1/2 tsp saffron leaves (NB refer to previous post about how to prepare saffron)
            -Salt and Pepper to taste.
            -As much olive oil as it takes to comfortable cover the meat.
            Originally posted by Jenry Hennings View Post
            This next one comes from the Holy Land, in the form of street vendor food: The Sweet Potato Falafel.. Gather you're shit:
            -2 Medium Sweet Potatoes/Yams/The orange ones.. (about 700g total)
            -Cumin
            -2 to 3 chopped garlic
            -Ground Coriander
            -Lemon Juice
            -Coconut Flour (120g)
            -Olive oil
            -Salt and Pepper

            1. Roast the potatoes whole until nice and tender, the remove them and leave to cool
            2. Peel them, and combine with cumin, coriander, lemon juice and coconut flour and mash to a smooth mix
            3. Stick them in the fridge for about an hour to firm up, or the freezer for half that, if you're particularly impatient.
            4. Remove, and then shape your mix into little balls.
            5. Place on an oiled tray, and whack them in the oven until their bases are golden brown. (Van Morrison rears his head again!)

            Sprinkle with sesame seeds before baking if feeling particularly whimsical.
            No sesame seeds on the falafel as I am allergic



            Thank you for these recipes! So far, I love ME cuisine
            Stumbled into Primal due to food allergies, and subsequent elimination of non-primal foods.

            Start Gluten-Free/Soy-Free: December 2012; start weight 158lbs, Ladies size 6
            Start Primal: March 2013, start weight 150lbs, Ladies size 6
            Current: 132lbs, Ladies size 2
            F/23/5'9"

            26lbs lost since cutting the crap.

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            • #66
              Originally posted by kathleen View Post
              No sesame seeds on the falafel as I am allergic



              Thank you for these recipes! So far, I love ME cuisine
              Looks like a feast! Glad you enjoyed.

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              • #67
                Wow, thanks for the sweet potato falafel recipe! Always looking for a new way to eat SP.
                My journal - The Walrus: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread108103.html

                Be silly, be honest, be kind. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

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                • #68
                  Sup. This is called Fesenjan. Probably the best thing I've eaten ever. It's a duck, or chicken, stew made with ground walnuts and pomegranate molasses slow cooked over about 3 hours or more (it's better the longer you go). Get you're shit together:
                  -2 Duck Legs and 2 Breasts
                  -Onion.
                  -400g walnuts.
                  -Half a cup pomegranate molasses.
                  -Saffron; tsp ground.
                  -Turmeric, Salt and Pepper.
                  -Oil

                  The Sauce.
                  1. Grind up the walnuts as finely as possible however you like; processor or by hand.
                  2. Lightly toast until it turns darker, but DO NOT let it burn.. tastes bitter.
                  3. Add enough water to make a paste, cover, and let it simmer for an hour on low heat, partially uncovered.

                  Don't let the mix run out of water, check it every 30 mins or so.

                  The Duck.

                  After an hour of sauce cooking..

                  1. Wash the duck, and cut the the duck breasts in 2.
                  2. Chop and onion in to fairly large chunks, and sautee in oil until golden.
                  3. Add turmeric, then stir.
                  4. Place meat on top of the onions and brown. Turn over after aboot 5 mins or so.
                  5. Remove and set aside.
                  6. Add half cup (or to taste) pomagranate molasses and saffron, salt and pepper, and a little more water, and continue to simmer for another hour.

                  Time elapsed- 2 hours.

                  The Big finish.

                  Combine the duck, onion, and all it's juices in the sauce mix, and let the whole thing simmer for one more hour so the duck can cook.

                  BOOM

                  Traditionally served with rice.

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                  • #69
                    Good things come in two. Another one called 'Ab-Goosht'. A peasent's dish, that eventually separates the solids from the soup, and eaten separately. It's tradition yo.
                    -2 Lamb shanks, and lamb neck (I got about 4 inches worth of neck, which the butcher cut in to 3 sections)
                    -Onion
                    -3 peeled potatoes
                    -3 tomatoes
                    -1 cup chickpeas
                    -1 cup white beans (both beans are about 1 can's worth drained.)
                    -2 very generous tablespoons of tomato puree
                    -Turmeric, Salt and Pepper.

                    1. Rinse the legumes, and for the chickpeas, put in cold water, and lightly squeeze them in your hands to remove the skins. Yes, they actually have skins on them.
                    2. Put every thing in a pot, cover with water, bring to the boil, and simmer for a couple hours.

                    It's done. You could just eat it like that, or to be all proper..

                    Separate the solids from the liquid, place in a bowl, and mash in to a thick, visually un-appealing paste. To serve authentically, serve the soup separately, and eat that first.
                    As for the meat mix, spread over a plate, and make a little gap in the middle where you can pour some of the soup in the middle.

                    And not an aubergine in sight..

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                    • #70
                      GOT ANOTHER ONE!

                      Khorest-e-Alu: Stew with prunes.

                      Ambiguous food name means there are several variations, this one's with chicken legs:

                      -4 chicken legs
                      -400g prunes.
                      -2 onions
                      -tsp turmeric
                      -1/2 tsp ground saffron
                      -salt/pepper
                      -oil

                      1. In a large saucepan, add oil on medium, the brown the chicken.
                      2. Once browned, remove the chicken, add a bit more oil, then saute onions 'til golden brown (texture like sun.. how many times have I made that joke..)
                      3. Once brown, add the turmeric, prunes, and saffron, and proceed to stir until onions are fully turmeric'd, and it all looks incorporated.
                      4. Add a small amount of boiling water and add the chicken, season with s'n'p, then let it broil for 5 mins or so on high
                      5. Add another cup of boiling water, cover, reduce heat to low, and leave for another 1 1/2 hours.

                      Typically served with rice. Smashing..

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                      • #71
                        Sounds delicious!
                        "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

                        B*tch-lite

                        Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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                        • #72
                          Originally posted by Jenry Hennings View Post
                          Sup. This is called Fesenjan. Probably the best thing I've eaten ever. It's a duck, or chicken, stew made with ground walnuts and pomegranate molasses slow cooked over about 3 hours or more (it's better the longer you go). Get you're shit together:
                          -2 Duck Legs and 2 Breasts
                          -Onion.
                          -400g walnuts.
                          -Half a cup pomegranate molasses.
                          -Saffron; tsp ground.
                          -Turmeric, Salt and Pepper.
                          -Oil

                          The Sauce.
                          1. Grind up the walnuts as finely as possible however you like; processor or by hand.
                          2. Lightly toast until it turns darker, but DO NOT let it burn.. tastes bitter.
                          3. Add enough water to make a paste, cover, and let it simmer for an hour on low heat, partially uncovered.

                          Don't let the mix run out of water, check it every 30 mins or so.

                          The Duck.

                          After an hour of sauce cooking..

                          1. Wash the duck, and cut the the duck breasts in 2.
                          2. Chop and onion in to fairly large chunks, and sautee in oil until golden.
                          3. Add turmeric, then stir.
                          4. Place meat on top of the onions and brown. Turn over after aboot 5 mins or so.
                          5. Remove and set aside.
                          6. Add half cup (or to taste) pomagranate molasses and saffron, salt and pepper, and a little more water, and continue to simmer for another hour.

                          Time elapsed- 2 hours.

                          The Big finish.

                          Combine the duck, onion, and all it's juices in the sauce mix, and let the whole thing simmer for one more hour so the duck can cook.

                          BOOM

                          Traditionally served with rice.
                          This looks fabulous. Shall make it some night in the week - any veg suggestions to accompany it???

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                          • #73
                            Originally posted by breadsauce View Post
                            This looks fabulous. Shall make it some night in the week - any veg suggestions to accompany it???
                            You could probably put in some kind of root veg in it and let it all slow cook? I'm thinking potatoes. Traditionally served with rice, so if you eat rice, that would probably go well


                            Sent from my iPhone using Marks Daily Apple Forum

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                            • #74
                              I'm looking forward to trying some of the recipes, especially the sweet potato! I'll see what I can contribute once I get home, though I know Levant cuisine better. Iranian food is really good but it sometimes seems like they add cranberries to everything :P

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                              • #75
                                Your Mecca to Middle Eastern Foods.

                                Originally posted by Valentia View Post
                                I'm looking forward to trying some of the recipes, especially the sweet potato! I'll see what I can contribute once I get home, though I know Levant cuisine better. Iranian food is really good but it sometimes seems like they add cranberries to everything :P
                                In all the Iranian food I've read/cooked, I've not come across a lot of recipes that call for cranberries. Which dishes do you have in mind? Pomegranate, yes, cranberries, not so much.

                                Plus, you can always omit them (unless it's a cranberry stew


                                Sent from my iPhone using Marks Daily Apple Forum

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