Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Your Mecca to Middle Eastern Foods.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    I recently completed a 50 mile run, which involved a bit of a carb load over the days before. It was an Armenian specialty called 'Garmir Pilav', or 'red rice..' Yes it's grains, but it's about as offensive as a basket full of kittens.. Get 'red-y' (So sorry..):
    -Basmati Rice
    -Tomato Puree
    -Ghee
    At it's simplest, just boil rice, mix the ghee in, and add puree near the end and simmer to allow the rice to absorb it whilst getting rid of excess water. At it's most complex, proper rice or 'chelow' can take some time, multiple pans, and elaborate pan flipping.. I'll post how if enough people want to know
    The puree makes the rice so much more enjoyable than just the bland plain white. Serve with a dollop of Greek yogurt or one of the 'mast-o-..' I posted before. Yum

    Comment


    • #32
      My posts are too long, so here's a short n sweet one: Baba Ghanoush/Mutabal whatever.. Easy as beating a dead dog:
      -Aubergine
      -Tahini
      -Garlic+Onion
      -Cumin
      -Lemon juice
      -Olive oil

      1. Grill (I fry.. Each to their own) Aubergine
      2. Once golden, set aside. Next, fry onions and garlic in existing oil.
      3. Add in the cumin and continue to stir till it shouts 'that's enough!'
      4. Combine everything in a food processor, lemon juice, tahini and all, blend, and serve..

      If grilling make sure you put holes in the aubergine.. Failure to do so will render it explosive. Khodar Hafez

      Comment


      • #33
        Any recipes out there?

        Comment


        • #34
          I am an unabashed fan of Persian food, and kebabs in particular.

          Oddly there aren't any establishments in Manchester but there is a road in nearby Bolton with many, and a very good Persian restaurant in the town centre.
          Meat is Prized, Wheat is Despised.

          Real Food - The REAL staff of life

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by Rip @ MIPWID View Post
            I am an unabashed fan of Persian food, and kebabs in particular.

            Oddly there aren't any establishments in Manchester but there is a road in nearby Bolton with many, and a very good Persian restaurant in the town centre.
            I'm quietly confident, although having not been there myself, that the 'curry mile' has Arabic/Iranian/Russian/Armenian restaurants scattered in amongst the curry houses, according to my cousin who went to uni there :P

            Comment


            • #36
              I thought brick lane in london was called the curry mile . As it has 100s of South Indian / Bangladesh restaurants i


              From London England UK

              Comment


              • #37
                Konichiwa!

                Recently I made a stew. One consisting of pre-packed 'Ghorma Sabzi' spice mix, a combo of fenugreek, lime, coriander amongst others, but with an addition whilst I'd known, typically never did for whatever.. That was the inclusion of dried fruit, such as prunes or dates, into the stew. Not a secret by any means, but often forgotton by the pot-roast community.
                It worked. Well. The mixed sweet n sour along with the squishy mouthfeel made this stew pretty sexy.
                Some veg i used were carrots, shrooms, broccoli, and most other harder vegetables. Did it in the morning, added stock as well for banter, let it sit in my aga bottom oven all day.

                Smashing. Try it. (I mean the dried fruit stew, not random destruction)

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by jakey View Post
                  hey, i've lived in 3 countries in the middle east! most stuff is good, so long as there's no wheat. persians cook with grapeseed oil, but arabs and israelis use olive oil, which really makes things easy. my favorite dish is mansaf, but that's really, really hard to make in the states.

                  so instead, stick with shakshuka (and some improvising is quite alright!):

                  in a skillet, combine a couple tbsp olive oil with 6-8 diced tomatoes, depending on size. you want to sautee them into a mushy tomato sauce!

                  season with cumin, coriander, cinnamon and garlic to your taste. i always stir in diced anchovy, though that's not traditional.

                  once the sauce looks like, well, tomato sauce, crack 4-6 eggs into it so that they float, whole, on the top. reduce heat and cover, so that the eggs poach.

                  serve it up!
                  I love a good shakshuka. What I have been doing recently is adding diced eggplant to the tomato sauce and then topping it with sausage (usually something spicy) and blue cheese. Traditional? Nope. Awesome? Yes.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by canio6 View Post
                    I love a good shakshuka. What I have been doing recently is adding diced eggplant to the tomato sauce and then topping it with sausage (usually something spicy) and blue cheese. Traditional? Nope. Awesome? Yes.
                    Shaksuka is the best. Especially as the weather gets colder and I want hearty comfort-y meals.

                    Originally posted by Jenry Hennings View Post
                    This next one comes from the Holy Land, in the form of street vendor food: The Sweet Potato Falafel.. .
                    Chickpea free falafel, definitely going to have to try this....
                    No disease that can be treated by diet should be treated with any other means.
                    -Maimonodies

                    The cure for anything is salt water - sweat, tears, or the sea.

                    Babes with BBQ

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      I thought shaksuka is a cheese or is it a chanklish?


                      From London England UK

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Shakshuka is Arabic for "a mixture" or derived from a Hebrew verb "to shake". I usually make mine with onions, garlic, bell pepper, tomatoes, hot pepper, and a mix of cumin, chili, and paprika. Makes a nice sauce and you crack eggs into it
                        "The grand essentials of happiness are: something to do, something to love and something to hope for." - Allan K. Chalmers (1759-1834)

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          WHO LOVES SHAWARMA?!?! I would jump in front of a bus for it, LOL!

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by GiGiEats View Post
                            WHO LOVES SHAWARMA?!?! I would jump in front of a bus for it, LOL!
                            The shawarma marinade Mark has on the site is worth negotiating highway traffic for.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Thanks! I lived in Israel for a couple of years and traveled Egypt and Jordan. Always loved the food. I miss falafel...
                              Home birthing legal mama. Unschooler. Jewish Intactivist (step away from the foreskin!). Full-term breastfeeder. Kettlebell padawan.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by Jenry Hennings View Post
                                This next one comes from the Holy Land, in the form of street vendor food: The Sweet Potato Falafel.. Gather you're shit:
                                -2 Medium Sweet Potatoes/Yams/The orange ones.. (about 700g total)
                                -Cumin
                                -2 to 3 chopped garlic
                                -Ground Coriander
                                -Lemon Juice
                                -Coconut Flour (120g)
                                -Olive oil
                                -Salt and Pepper

                                1. Roast the potatoes whole until nice and tender, the remove them and leave to cool
                                2. Peel them, and combine with cumin, coriander, lemon juice and coconut flour and mash to a smooth mix
                                3. Stick them in the fridge for about an hour to firm up, or the freezer for half that, if you're particularly impatient.
                                4. Remove, and then shape your mix into little balls.
                                5. Place on an oiled tray, and whack them in the oven until their bases are golden brown. (Van Morrison rears his head again!)

                                Sprinkle with sesame seeds before baking if feeling particularly whimsical.
                                I think I love you! This is perfect. I am trying to eat more carbs.
                                Home birthing legal mama. Unschooler. Jewish Intactivist (step away from the foreskin!). Full-term breastfeeder. Kettlebell padawan.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X