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  • Intro to lamb?

    My local farmer's market has lamb. I've never had lamb, so I thought I'd come here to ask a basic question:

    What is something easy to do with lamb, and what kind of cuts should I look for? Should I just bake a lamb leg or something?

    M.

  • #2
    Originally posted by MEversbergII View Post
    My local farmer's market has lamb. I've never had lamb, so I thought I'd come here to ask a basic question:

    What is something easy to do with lamb, and what kind of cuts should I look for? Should I just bake a lamb leg or something?

    M.
    Roasted leg of lamb is fantastic and not difficult. Also, loin chops are excellent and can be grilled up just like steak (medium-rare lamb is the bomb). Other cuts (shoulder for example) may be tougher and require different techniques. Honestly, as you have never had it and lamb tends to be expensive (around here anyway) I'd grab some loin chops and give them a try before spending too much on something you may potentially not like. If you like them snag a leg, roast it, and enjoy the lamby-goodness.

    Edit: to roast lamb I generally season it with salt, pepper, garlic, and rosemary. I tend to cook it like a beef roast (start high heat for 15 minutes or so and then low heat until desired temp - looking for medium rare)

    As for chops - throw them on a grill.

    edit2: helpful lamb roasting chart: http://www.superiorfarms.com/the-lam...-method-2.html
    Last edited by canio6; 05-21-2013, 08:22 AM.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by canio6 View Post
      Other cuts (shoulder for example) may be tougher and require different techniques.
      I'm a cheapskate so I usually get shoulder chops. You can't really grill or broil them but they're extremely tasty braised, e.g. 5 min sear on each side then cover on low for 1 hour. Save the bones of course!
      37//6'3"/185

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      • #4
        I found that lamb roast and lamb ribs were fine by standard roasting methods (dry roasted) with a simple rub of salt, pepper and other spices.

        ground lamb makes great meatballs too.
        My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
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        • #5
          Originally posted by Leida View Post
          ground lamb makes great meatballs too.
          ground lamb is great.

          This is probably my favorite ground lamb recipe: Primal Lamb Lasagna |

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          • #6
            I have done leg of lamb and cut into chunks and then kebab it. Lamb burgers. Roast leg of lamb. Braised lamb shakes. LOVE lamb chops if you can find shoulder chops, delish.

            http://maggiesfeast.wordpress.com/
            Check out my blog. Hope to share lots of great recipes and ideas!

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            • #7
              Google a recipe for Stifado. Lamb is used in Greece but some of the recipes use beef. Basic ingredients are lamb, tomato, onions, red wine, cinnamon and nutmeg. Amazing.

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              • #8
                Here's my favorite thing to do with ground lamb: Lamb/feta burgers topped with cucumber yogurt sauce and tomatoes (and more feta). http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...ml#post1142532
                "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

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                • #9
                  Oh awesome. When they open back up Saturday I will make ground lamb priority. Failing that, loin sounds like a good place to start.

                  M.

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                  • #10
                    lammmmmmmmmmb.
                    lambs liver is great, milder than pig or beef with much small vessels not big chewy tough ones.
                    Boneless iamb leg steaks; beautiful treat just like a good steak.
                    Roast lamb -poke slits in it with the blade of a knife and stick slivers of garlic and sprigs of rosemary into the slits in theflesh and roast 20 mins per 450g/lb, plus an extra 20 mins. Cook at 220C.
                    Shoulder, nice fatty cut, 25-30 minutes per pound, plus 20 minutes, at about 170-180 C
                    loin chops and cutlets not big but tender sweet and full of flavour
                    Lamb mince makes wonderful kebabs, use harissa paste and chopped mint
                    neck is wonderful stewed
                    shank is great cooked slowly with onion garlic and tomatoes
                    Lamb is grass fed and one of the least interfered with beasties. Eaten young (mutton is older sheep much stronger taste)
                    Last edited by CarbDodger; 05-21-2013, 12:54 PM.
                    When I'd had enough of the grain and starched based 'diabetic eating for health' diet (eating for health, my ass!) my weight was 242.5 lbs. On starting primal- 18th April 2013 weight : 238.1.
                    27th July 2013. weight after 100 days 136.9 weight lost 101.2lb ; that's 105.6lbs since I stopped the 'diabetic eating for health'
                    new journal http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...ml#post1264082

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                    • #11
                      Yeah, get some liver! Love it!

                      If you like garlic, lamb seems to take to it perfectly. For cuts you're going to slow-cook, just stab the flesh and push in a piece.

                      Shanks are my favourite. My method is to tagine cook them, but slow-cooked simply in salty water with some herbs. Perfect. Save the stock for soups and the base for a gravy with the shanks. Spicy is really good!
                      Paul
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                      "... needs more fish!"

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                      • #12
                        I was shocked at the idea of never having eaten lamb! We basically alternate lamb and beef most nights, with chicken or seafood or game less often.

                        I mostly use lamb backstraps (google Lamb Backstraps image to see what I am talking about) or fillets. I marinade and cook them exactly the same as steak - medium rare. If I can't buy backstraps, I bone out a frenched rack - easy to do. Or just get some cutlets and cook either side until still pink on the bone.

                        Cubed lamb leg makes fantastic kebabs (oil, lemon, white wine, garlic, oregano,basil,sage,pepper). Or satay sticks. Or we just use it thinly cut in our normal thai stir fries. Or any other asian dish where you could use beef. Or you can curry it or any other slow cooked dish.

                        I still can't imagine never having mum's lamb roast. It's the classic never-fail dish of poor cooks.

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                        • #13
                          One wonderful thing you can do with a leg roast is to get it boned out by the butcher and "butterflied" into what looks like a huge steak. Rub with some garlic, black pepper and rosemary, sear it both sides in a heavy cast iron skillet or even in a hooded gas BBQ. Cover and sizzle very gently for about an hour and a half, turning every half hour. The lamb that God eats.

                          Edit: yes as with fellow Australian Bifcus above it's always puzzled me why Americans don't generally eat lamb - it used to be our main meat here although beef and particularly chicken have overtaken it since the 1970s. I believe that when the range lands were being opened up the cattle barons drove out the shepherds or strung em up, it's all there in the John Wayne movies.
                          Last edited by MikeAtTaree; 05-21-2013, 05:54 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Wondered that myself, MikeAtTaree. My mother was a dismal cook, but what's easier than lamb is boiling some hot dogs and mac. Let me tell you about spaghetti sometime...

                            Anyways, I guess that beef was making more profit, so they could simply buy out the shepherds. Maybe briefly they were one in the same.

                            Anyways, what's all this about lamb being grass fed? Can't they give them corn or somesuch anyways?

                            M.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by MEversbergII View Post
                              Anyways, what's all this about lamb being grass fed? Can't they give them corn or somesuch anyways?

                              M.
                              From what I understand, there is a ton of grass just sitting there in New Zealand for lambs to eat so it makes little sense to grain-feed them. Even a lot of the lamb we get in the US comes from New Zealand.

                              As for why Americans don't eat much, well, it is expensive as hell. Last I checked lamb chops were something like $18.99/lb. I can get steak for half that. Chicken for $1.19-4.99 (depending on the cut), and outside of lobster, fish is far cheaper. So small selection + huge price = not much lamb eaten. I wish it was more widly available so perhaps prices would go down.

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