Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Free food in the UK.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by MikeAtTaree View Post
    elderberry wine
    My mother used to make elderberry wine. One of her cold "cures" was mulled elderberry wine and ginger.
    Why use a sledge hammer to crack a nut when a steam roller is even more effective, and, is fun to drive.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by breadsauce View Post
      ground elder
      I've got loads of this. I gather it was used and brought here by the Romans. What does it taste like?
      Why use a sledge hammer to crack a nut when a steam roller is even more effective, and, is fun to drive.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Nigel View Post
        I've got loads of this. I gather it was used and brought here by the Romans. What does it taste like?
        When I first tried ground elder i REALLY didn't like it - but now I realise that it was autumn and the rank taste was simply because it was too old and had flowered. Early stuff, or young leaves (keep picking it and you'll keep having young leaves) are much more tender and tasty. Unusual flavour - hint of celery, but more aromatic. It makes an excellent soup, and can also be wilted in the water left on the leaves after washing, with a large knob of butter. Better is to fry some chopped up bacon until crisping and the fat is running, then add the ground elder to the pan and cook until wilted.

        I shall be trying more methods of cooking it but I am on the way to becoming a convert!

        Comment


        • #19
          Thanks for prompting me to eat nettles and dandelion, I have been - great stuff, not to mention free ! There are some weeds in my garden that have a white flower at the top and look like nettles from a distance. They don't have any stinging properties and their leaves have a mild taste of garlic + onion, I know they're not wild garlic as I eat that whenever I find it. Any ideas what this might be? To be honest the aftertaste isn't that good although initially they do taste like wild garlic leaves.
          Last edited by Owen; 05-06-2013, 02:16 PM.
          Healthy is the new wealthy.

          http://www.facebook.com/groups/ances...handnutrition/

          Comment


          • #20
            Are blackberries still widespread? In the 1950s we used to get a week off school in the Autumn and in the North East it was referred to as "blackberry week" although didn't always coincide with the crop and in Scotland it was "potato week" as traditionally it was when the kids would help the parents who went off to farms as casual pickers to harvest potatoes, so would have wagged off school anyway.

            Hmm blackberry and apple crumble with custard.

            Comment


            • #21
              Yeah, they grow along hedgerows, on scrub land, waste land and ... lucky for me ... in my garden
              Paul
              http://www.pjgh.co.uk
              http://www.livingintheiceage.co.uk

              "... needs more fish!"

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Owen View Post
                Thanks for prompting me to eat nettles and dandelion, I have been - great stuff, not to mention free ! There are some weeds in my garden that have a white flower at the top and look like nettles from a distance. They don't have any stinging properties and their leaves have a mild taste of garlic + onion, I know they're not wild garlic as I eat that whenever I find it. Any ideas what this might be? To be honest the aftertaste isn't that good although initially they do taste like wild garlic leaves.

                Is it this?

                White Dead-nettle Hedgerow: Edible Species | John Wright | Wild-Food

                Lamium album White Dead Nettle PFAF Plant Database

                If so - it is edible. Both white and purple dead nettle are. Tea made from them is OK - and they can be added to soups etc.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Coo, seen this on my walk to town for shopping. I'll pick some leaves and give it a try.
                  Why use a sledge hammer to crack a nut when a steam roller is even more effective, and, is fun to drive.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Hi Mike, yes blackberries are very common and one of my favorites, looking forward to that in 2 or 3 months time. I know a few spots where I live in worcestershire but when I was in wales last year, they were everywhere
                    Healthy is the new wealthy.

                    http://www.facebook.com/groups/ances...handnutrition/

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Hi Breadsauce, no its not that - although I will now look out for this dead nettle also. I may have to take a photo of whats in my garden. It probably isn't ideal to eat, but because it tasted like garlic I'm curious. I'll post it on here when I have a photo. I noticed it on roadsides today also.

                      Also today I discovered bedstraw, which often grows in and amongst nettles, is also edible, although very fibrous, I added it to my nettle soup:

                      Hedge Bedstraw / Galium mollugo (Plants) by Poppy on 16th May 2011 | iSpot

                      Just noticed its already mentioned on this post, called goosegrass
                      Last edited by Owen; 05-09-2013, 02:32 PM.
                      Healthy is the new wealthy.

                      http://www.facebook.com/groups/ances...handnutrition/

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Ok I now know what the plant is thats growing in my garden (aside from the edible dandelions that are also everywhere), its Garlic Mustard - just seen it on a video.

                        hedge chef episode 2 - Hedge mustard - YouTube
                        Healthy is the new wealthy.

                        http://www.facebook.com/groups/ances...handnutrition/

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Thanks for that link! I know where this stuff grows profusely - but I didn't know it was edible. I love that recipe and will be making this ad infinitum!!!

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            NO problems, I've also found some dead nettles as well. I've also just found this behind my garden on a patch of wasteland, also edible, and very common in the uk:

                            Ground Elder (Aegopodium Podagraria) - 2012-06-16 - YouTube

                            I use this just as I would broccoli stems
                            Healthy is the new wealthy.

                            http://www.facebook.com/groups/ances...handnutrition/

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X