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Almost-Primal Orthodox Christian Lenten Eating and Cooking

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  • A blessed New Year to all of you! Sorry I didn't post much during Advent, but with the extra services, the preparations for Christmas and traveling to see my grandchildren, I wasn't online very much. Eventually my goal is to post my weekly menus during a Lenten period although my husband has a blessing from our priest not to fast as strictly because of his health, so perhaps my menus wouldn't be as great an example of Lenten-Primal as I hoped they would be.

    I have discovered a new Lenten Breakfast food: CHIA GOODNESS
    Ruth's Foods | Earthly Choice | Your Values... Your Food!

    It may be border-line primal because it is mostly seeds, but it isn't grain. The original flavor, which isn't bad and I find quite filling, consists of: chia seed, buckwheat, hemp seeds, and sea salt. The other flavors (Apple-Almond-Cinnamon, Chocolate, and Cranberry-Ginger) have additions to those ingredients.

    You can mix it with either hot (or warm) liquid, or cold liquid. (I just mix it with hot water but you can use other liquid.) If you mix it with hot liquid you have a hot cereal, if you mix it with cold you have a breakfast pudding. You can mix it with the liquid in the evening and after it has thickened you can refrigerate it for a ready-to-go breakfast in the morning.

    I think this product is going to be one of my Lenten favorites!
    Last edited by Antiochia; 01-16-2014, 06:53 AM.
    Ruth

    See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

    Comment


    • Hi everyone, I am SO excited to see this thread because I'm brand new to primal and am an Orthodox Christian and the Great Fast is right around the corner. I haven't officially started panicking yet about the upcoming Fast but the dread is starting.

      The idea of keeping the Fast and trying to eat primal/paleo seems almost impossible. My DH is allergic to nuts which makes things really difficult even without trying to eat primal.

      Jenny

      Comment


      • Hi Jenny,
        Well, we can't really keep Paleo/Primal, but we can keep ALMOST Paleo/Primal, hence the name of this thread. Not being able to eat nuts is tough. Is coconut okay? I tend to use coconut milk and almond milk in recipes. I'm sure you could substitute rice milk or whatever your favorite milk substitute is for the almond milk. Coconut milk is more like cream. We also eat properly soaked and cooked beans several times a week during a fast (see Post #35, pg. 4). I don't think occasional beans are a problem. (We also eat lots of seafood, as you can see from these recipes.) I hope this thread can be helpful to you. Feel free to post any recipes that you use that fits the requirements and let me know if you are looking for anything in particular.
        Last edited by Antiochia; 01-16-2014, 06:52 AM.
        Ruth

        See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

        Comment


        • Here's another Brownie recipe that I found here: Gluten Free Brownie I haven't tried it yet. Here is the recipe -- it looks interesting:

          GLUTEN-FREE BROWNIES


          Ingredients:

          1/2 c pureed beets
          2/3 c cocoa powder
          1/3 c coconut oil
          1/3 c raw honey
          1/3 c raw sugar
          1/2 c pecans (ground into a fine meal)
          2 tbs ground flaxseed
          1/4 tsp baking soda

          Warm coconut oil and raw honey on low heat. When it is melted, remove from heat. Stir in cocoa powder and raw sugar. Add pureed beets, ground pecans, ground flaxseed and baking soda. Stir until smooth.

          Spray an 8 x 8 baking dish. Pour into dish and spread. Bake for 30 minutes at 350 degrees.

          To make your brownies even healthier try using raw pecans. First soak the pecans for 4-6 hours. Then completely dehydrate the pecans in a dehydrator or at the lowest heat in your oven.

          Recipe creator says:"If you have never tried a chocolate beet recipe you are in for a surprise at how great it tastes."
          Ruth

          See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

          Comment


          • First of all, of course, pregnant and nursing mothers are not supposed to fast. Also if you are sick you don't need to fast. Fasting is to weaken us and make us more dependent and focused on God. If you are sick you are already dependent on God. If you get sick during Lent, lighten the fast!!!

            Hi Everyone,

            I am Ancient Faith too. I love to see that there is more of us here.

            Unfortunately, I am also a drug free (that includes insulin) T2 Diabetic and am struggling to stay there. My carb count is very low: I come in between 30 and 60 carbs per day. I am pretty much left with nothing to eat if I follow the fast. But, I guess I am under the "sick" rule, even if I am not sick on my current regimen. Though if I go off it, I could lose a limb or two ... And fasting, probably the Diabetes, makes me C-R-A-B-B-Y. Not good for those around me. Your recipes look so nice, but, unfortunately quite toxic to me. Sniffle!

            One of the things I found when I starting eating low carb/Paleo for the Diabetes was that my taste changed. I loved Lamb as a kid. Now I can't even stand the smell of it. Same with shrimp. Mussels and Oysters make me nearly hurl. I am okay with clams.

            So my way of dealing with the issue is to remember to target/goal of fasting, which is laid out by our Lord in Matthew 25. Since I can not do the food fasting, I try to keep the non-food parts of the fast, as laid out by Saint John Crysostom:

            "Therefore, whoever limits the fast to the deprivation of food, he is the one who, in reality, abhors and ridicules the fast. Are you fasting? Show me your fast with your works. Which works? If you see someone who is poor, show him mercy. If you see an enemy, reconcile with him. If you see a friend who is becoming successful, do not be jealous of him!

            In other words, not only should the mouth fast, but the eyes and the legs and the arms and all the other parts of the body should fast as well. Let the hands fast, remaining clean from stealing and greediness. Let the legs fast, avoiding roads which lead to sinful sights. Let the eyes fast by not fixing themselves on beautiful faces and by not observing the beauty of others. You are not eating meat, are you? You should not eat debauchery with your eyes as well. Let your hearing also fast. The fast of hearing is not to accept bad talk against others and sly defamations. "

            Saint John goes on for several paragraphs about this. He holds us to high standards and expect results from the fast. Here is the whole letter from Saint John:
            St. John Chrysostom -- On Fasting

            Which bring up the obvious question, why aren't I doing this all year long and have to wait for the fast? I tell myself it is a reminder to get with the program. A push to keep me on track.

            I guess I am writing this as an explanation as to why I am eating meat during the fast.

            I hope I have not made any of our non-christian friends uncomfortable.

            Glory be to God!
            -T
            Last edited by ToddAndMargo; 01-27-2014, 04:38 PM.

            Comment


            • Thanks for writing,ToddandMargo! Your post is a good reminder that we are not to be concerned with how other people fast. Also, my priest says that if you don't fast it isn't a sin (although I think it also depends on your attitude), it's just a missed opportunity -- or in your case an opportunity your body won't allow you to take advantage of.

              As I'm sure you know, fasting is a way of saying no to ourselves, and strengthening our willpower so we can say no when a particularly attractive sin presents itself to us. I'm sure your priest can help you find other ways to fast during Lenten times. My recipes on this thread are merely offerings and suggestions. I am not prescribing a way it has to be done. If any of these suggestions help a person observe the Lenten fast while continuing as primally as possible under the circumstances, great! If none of them help your particular situation, that's okay too. You know what you need to do to stay healthy.

              One of my friends from church has an iron problem, so he needs to eat red meat once a week, doctor's orders. In cases like that my priest just says, "Do your best." My husband has to continue to eat dairy, doctor's orders again, because he needs the calcium -- he's on the verge of osteoporosis. As we get older especially, our bodies need certain nutrients. (Both my husband and I are over 60). Another friend from church, Toula of blessed memory (she passed away a couple years ago), said that when she was a young girl in Greece her mother told her, "Fast when you are young, because when you get old you will not be able to."

              So anyway, how you observe Lent is up to you, your family, your priest, and God - not up to me or any other people! God bless you as we enter the Triodion next month and begin our preparations for Great Lent!

              And PS - That's a wonderful homily you referenced by St. John Chrysostom! Thank you for the link!
              Ruth

              See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

              Comment


              • In Mark's blog today- Dear Mark: Cruciferous Vegetables and Hypothyroidism, Sprint Frequency, Protein Sources for Orthodox Lent, and Saunas | Mark's Daily Apple - he handles a question about protein during Orthodox Christian Lent. (He recommends Tempeh, lentils, and shellfish as a start and asks for other suggestions from the readers.) I found the comments relating to this question quite helpful and interesting. And also - its good to know there are more of us out there who follow Orthodox Christian Lenten practices.
                Ruth

                See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

                Comment


                • Interesting blog post on Chris Kresser's site suggesting that legumes may be somewhat paleo!
                  https://chriskresser.com/are-legumes-paleo
                  Ruth

                  See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Antiochia View Post
                    Interesting blog post on Chris Kresser's site suggesting that legumes may be somewhat paleo!
                    https://chriskresser.com/are-legumes-paleo
                    Hi Ruth,

                    But toxic to diabetics, like myself

                    Beans, pinto, mature seeds, cooked, boiled, with salt:
                    Nutrition Facts and Analysis for Beans, pinto, mature seeds, cooked, boiled, with salt
                    1 Cup = 45 grams carbs. (I am 30 to 60 max per day.)
                    15 gram of protein is good though.

                    As I remember too, I had to avoid eating them at least two days before going out in public.

                    But when you are on the "fast", that doesn't leave a lot of stuff for you to eat. :'(

                    -T

                    Comment


                    • True. Our priest says that if you can't follow the fast for health reasons, there are other ways to fast. Fasting from food is just a way to practice denying ourselves something we want so that when we are tempted by a particularly attractive sin we are strong enough to say no. I' m sure you (with the help of your father confessor) can come up with other ways you can deny yourself during Lent that would accomplish the same goal. I wish you a blessed Lent as we enter in this coming week!

                      Sent from my Nexus 7 using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app
                      Ruth

                      See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

                      Comment


                      • Here's another interesting blog post about Lent and continuing to eat Paleo:
                        Paleo Living and Orthodox Lent

                        And here is another one:
                        http://web.archive.org/web/201104021...ing/fast-lent/
                        Last edited by Antiochia; 03-01-2014, 08:30 AM.
                        Ruth

                        See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

                        Comment


                        • I'm not posting much this year - after all it IS lent. I'm trying not to let my focus be on food - even though it is lenten food. That being said, here's an interesting looking recipe:
                          Yam and Peanut Stew with Kale recipe on Food52.com

                          You could always substitute almonds and almond butter for the peanuts. I haven't tried it yet.
                          Ruth

                          See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

                          Comment


                          • Supper tonight was a concoction I'm calling CHICKPEA MARINARA ONE-POT MEAL. This is pretty much a non-recipe that I threw together from stuff I had on hand. It turned out pretty good:

                            Ingredients: onions, celery, green pepper, optional garlic, optional mushrooms, marinara sauce, leftover cooked spaghetti squash, cooked chickpeas (garbanzos), sliced or whole olives

                            (Note: Proportions are whatever you want.)

                            Saute some chopped onions, celery,and green pepper in a little coconut oil (You could also add some sliced mushrooms and minced garlic). When done to your taste add some Marinara Sauce (see post #86, page 9). Then stir in some leftover cooked spaghetti squash, and some cooked chickpeas. When it is all heated through stir in some sliced or whole Calamata Olives or green olives and serve.
                            Last edited by Antiochia; 03-15-2014, 09:06 AM.
                            Ruth

                            See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

                            Comment


                            • I saw this recipe link on the MDA Facebook page. I gotta try this!

                              GRAIN-FREE FLATBREAD
                              Recipe from:Grain-Free Flatbread (Paleo, Vegan, and AIP-friendly) | The Domestic Man

                              Servings: 4
                              Time: 20 mins
                              Difficulty: Easy
                              Print

                              1 1/2 cups tapioca starch
                              1/2 cup coconut milk
                              2 tbsp coconut oil (olive oil, lard, ghee, butter okay)
                              1/2 tsp salt
                              3 tbsp nutritional yeast
                              1 tsp dried rosemary, divided
                              1/2 tsp dried oregano
                              1/4 tsp white pepper
                              olive oil for drizzling
                              sea salt flakes or kosher salt for sprinkling

                              1. Place a pizza stone, cast iron skillet, or heavy duty baking sheet in the oven, and preheat it to 500F. Place the tapioca starch in a mixing bowl and set aside.

                              2. As the oven heats, add the coconut milk, oil, and salt into a small pan and heat over medium heat until just about to boil, then pour it into the mixing bowl. Mix with a spoon until incorporated into the starch, then set aside for five minutes to cool.

                              3. Add the nutritional yeast, half of the rosemary, and the oregano and white pepper to the dough, then knead together to incorporate everything. Carefully remove the hot pizza stone from the oven, then (again, carefully!) spread the dough over the stone, to about 1/4″ thickness. It doesn’t have to be pretty. Drizzle a little olive oil over the dough and sprinkle on the remaining rosemary, then place in the oven. Bake until crispy and firm to the touch, 8-10 minutes.

                              4. Drizzle with more olive oil, sprinkle with sea salt flakes; slice and serve.

                              ** Serve warm alongside curries or pasta dishes.
                              Ruth

                              See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

                              Comment


                              • Here's another link I found on the MDA Facebook page. Good advice during Lent regarding food choices:
                                10 Things Everyone Can Learn From Paleo (Even If You Hate It)
                                Ruth

                                See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

                                Comment

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