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Almost-Primal Orthodox Christian Lenten Eating and Cooking

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  • Here's a good recipe to bring to a special Lenten event where refreshments are served. I found this recipe here:
    Chocolate Coconut Clusters - Wellness Mama

    CHOCOLATE COCONUT CLUSTERS
    Ingredients:

    1 (5 oz) bag Flaked or shredded coconut- unsweetened
    2/3 cup melted coconut oil + 1 TBSP
    1/2 cup almond butter
    1 tsp vanilla
    1 cup dark chocolate or semi-sweet chocolate chips

    How to Make Chocolate Coconut Clusters:

    1. In medium bowl, mix coconut flakes, 2/3 cup melted coconut oil, vanilla, and almond butter until well mixed.
    2. Using hands, form into 1 inch balls and put on a plate.
    3. Put the plate in the freezer until the clusters harden completely.
    4. Once the clusters have hardened, melt the chocolate in a double boiler with 1 TBSP coconut oil until smooth.
    5. Dip the clusters into the chocolate and put back on a plate or in a small baking dish
    6. Put them into refrigerator and eat once they get cold.
    7. Enjoy the awesome mixture of crunchy chocolate shell and chewy coconut center!
    Ruth

    See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

    Comment


    • I figure it would be good to post some fish recipes before the Advent Fast starts in November. Depending on your particular kind of Orthodoxy - Russian, Greek, Antiochian, Serbian, etc... and your own parish priest, you may be having more fish/wine/oil days - at least during the beginning of the Advent Fast.

      Here is a fish recipe, that can be thrown together quickly - for example, when you come home from a Vesperal Liturgy and everyone is hungry:

      TUNA STIR FRY
      16 oz. bag of frozen stir-fry vegetables
      1 to 2 tablespoons oil of choice: Sesame, olive, and/or coconut*
      1 or 2 5-oz. cans tuna, drained OR 1 pouch (6 to 7 oz. size) tuna
      Juice of 1/2 lemon
      Splash of soy sauce or terriyaki sauce (optional)
      Season to taste with salt and pepper (optional)
      Rice or cauliflower rice

      Stir fry the bag of vegetables in oil until just done or almost done to your liking. Add the tuna, and lemon juice. Continue to stir and cook until everything is hot. Taste - adjust seasoning, add a splash of soy sauce or terriyaki sauce if you like. Serve over rice or cauliflower rice.

      *Note:On fish days, oil (and wine) are always allowed.
      Ruth

      See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

      Comment


      • Antiochia, while shopping today, I noticed "grapeseed oil," and wondered if you'd tried it. I never have, but it looks nice and green. :-)

        We made this for supper last evening and it was awesome. I can't remember how I stumbled across the video.

        Easy Going Primal Episode Two - YouTube

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Tim50 View Post
          Antiochia, while shopping today, I noticed "grapeseed oil," and wondered if you'd tried it. I never have, but it looks nice and green. :-)
          Hey Tim, grapeseed oil is actually not a great choice. Healthy Oils | Mark's Daily Apple
          Depression Lies

          Comment


          • Hi again -- I've been out of town visiting our DD, so haven't posted in a while. The only oils that I heat during Lent are Coconut Oil, and if I want an Asian taste, the Toasted Sesame Oil (which may not be a great idea, since it is a seed oil, but I figure once in a while won't hurt. I see from the post that NW referenced, that Mark suggests adding the Toasted Sesame oil for flavor AFTER the dish is cooked. I never thought of that!) I use the high oleic cold pressed sunflower and safflower oils in non-cooked recipes like salads. (And of course, Saturdays, Sundays, and Feast Days during a Lenten time I use olive oil.) I don't cook with grapeseed oil, BUT it makes a great moisturizer to rub on your skin after a shower!

            (Note: I also read that Macadamia Nut oil is a great choice for salads, and lower heat sauteing, but it is so darn expensive, I haven't tried it yet. Sometimes I rationalize buying expensive healthy food by saying, well, its either pay for healthy food, or pay the doctor -- haven't done that yet with Macadamia Nut oil, though.)
            Last edited by Antiochia; 09-10-2013, 05:58 AM.
            Ruth

            See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Tim50 View Post

              We made this for supper last evening and it was awesome. I can't remember how I stumbled across the video.

              Easy Going Primal Episode Two - YouTube
              Mmmmmmmm - this recipe looks wonderful. During Lenten times, I bet it would be good with chopped shrimp (I would use raw, and chop with a knife into small pieces and then saute).

              During non-Lenten times, I can see how this would be a good basic recipe that you could use with ground turkey or lamb also. Thanks for the link!
              Ruth

              See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

              Comment


              • If you are having people over for a get-together during a lenten time, or if it is a "Feast/Fast" Day (like Annunciation) check out:
                Three Recipes For That Snack Attack!! | Everyday Paleo

                In this post, Sarah Fragoso shares recipes for:

                PLANTAIN CHIPS & GUACAMOLE

                SHRIMP TACOS

                SWEET POTATO SPEARS (baked)


                Note: I think one could make a shrimp taco salad from the Shrimp Taco recipe above
                Last edited by Antiochia; 09-13-2013, 08:52 AM. Reason: added note
                Ruth

                See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

                Comment


                • Hi folks,

                  Tonight is Friday so I made Sweet and Sour Shrimp for supper. Here's the sauce recipe:

                  SWEET & SOUR SAUCE

                  Mix together:
                  3/4 cup pineapple juice (this may include part all-fruit apricot jam) - pineapple juice is from a can of pineapple.
                  3 tablespoons rice vinegar
                  Up to 3 tablespoons coconut sugar (or brown sugar)
                  2 tablespoons soy sauce
                  1 tablespoon arrowroot
                  1 teaspoon (or more) grated or minced ginger (I use this, but you can use fresh grated.)
                  1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

                  To use as a plain sauce, just bring to a boil and when the sauce thickens and clears, it's done.

                  To use in a sweet & sour main dish here is what I did (sorry, I didn't measure very well -- any measurements below are approximate).

                  First I cut up my veggies, thawed my (raw) shrimp, and cut the shrimp in half (down the middle butterfly style into long thin pieces.)

                  Then I stir-fried onion chunks and and a sliced carrot in toasted sesame oil. When that was done I added green pepper and canned pineapple tidbits, and stir-fried until the green pepper was mostly cooked. I added the shrimp, and stir-fried until the shrimp was cooked. Then I poured on the uncooked sauce and stirred the mixture until the sauce thickened and cleared. Then I stirred in some halved grape tomatoes, and took it off the heat. I served it over cauliflower rice with roasted cashews to sprinkle on top.

                  Maybe next time I'll actually measure the veggies and shrimp!
                  Ruth

                  See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

                  Comment


                  • More and more people at my church are becoming gluten-intolerant, and developing other food issues. By way of addressing this problem, here's a copy of the latest email we received from the director of women's ministries at our parish concerning our church potlucks:

                    "Dear Ladies,

                    It has come to our attention that an increasing number of folks at Church cannot tolerate certain foods. If you are able to prepare your contribution so that it is gluten and dairy free or doesn't have nuts, please put a little note next to it so those with these intolerances know that food is safe to eat.

                    As many food additives also contain gluten, you might want to check out what these are before marking your food contribution "Gluten-Free". The following link explains what is and what is not gluten free:
                    Gluten-free diet: What's allowed, what's not - MayoClinic.com

                    If you have a serious health condition and need to avoid something other than gluten, dairy or nuts, please contact one of us so that we can get that information out to those who would like to contribute healthy foods for everyone.

                    Thank you for giving this some thought!
                    "

                    I'm really glad that this is being recognized in our community - perhaps this is an issue you might want to bring up at your church too!
                    Last edited by Antiochia; 09-22-2013, 07:24 PM.
                    Ruth

                    See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

                    Comment


                    • Here is a Greek recipe for Stuffed Grape leaves. This recipe uses white rice - I don't think I could make it with cauliflower! However, I get the impression that once in a while, white rice isn't so bad.

                      Anyway, one day I was visiting with an older member of our church named Toula. (May God have mercy on her soul – she has since departed this life.) Anyway, she explained to me how she made her wonderful dolmathes which she would always bring to our Lenten potlucks. Since she didn’t use a recipe, we looked at one of her Greek cookbooks, and then she told me how she would cook this recipe. I have tried to incorporate her comments into the directions; I hope I absorbed enough of her cooking wisdom to pass it on to you.

                      DOLMATHES (Stuffed Grape Leaves)

                      3 medium onions, chopped
                      1 or 2 cloves garlic, minced fine (optional)
                      oil
                      2 cups white rice (raw), "Uncle Ben's"
                      1 cup chopped parsley
                      1 cup water
                      salt and pepper
                      50 grape leaves, fresh or canned
                      3 cups hot water
                      1 lemon
                      oil
                      salt or bouillon powder

                      To make the rice filling: Thoroughly rinse the rice to remove starch. Set aside. Fry the onions and garlic (if using), in as much oil as seems necessary, until onions are golden. Add the washed rice, parsley, 1 cup water, salt & pepper. Cover and let simmer a few minutes -- but not long enough to cook the rice, because the rice will finish cooking when it is in the grape leaves. Remove the filling mixture from heat and let cool.

                      Meanwhile, rinse and drain the grape leaves. Then fill each leaf carefully, using one large or two small leaves for each dolma, making sure that the shiny side of the leaves is on the outside. Use only a teaspoon of filling, because it will expand as the rice cooks.

                      Select a large heavy bottomed pot with a lid. Place a few coarse leaves on bottom of pot (or parsley or dill -- use up the stems), and arrange dolmathes side by side and layer upon layer until all leaves and filling are used. Then, mix the juice of one lemon, 3 cups of hot water, and a little salt (or bouillon powder). Pour this liquid over the dolmathes. Then drizzle a little oil over all. Set a heavy plate face down directly on the dolmathes in the pot, and then cover the pot with the lid. Cook over very low heat for 2 hours, so that the rice cooks gradually and does not break the grape leaves. When the rice is cooked, remove from heat and chill. Serve cold.

                      Toula's note: Be sure to pick your grape leaves before June 10th or they will be tough. You can use canned grape leaves from the grocery store, but fresh or home canned grape leaves are more tender.

                      My note: I checked another recipe. It said that if you use canned grape leaves from the grocery store, drain and rinse them. Then put them in a saucepan with water to cover and boil for 15 minutes to soften the leaves. Drain the leaves and separate them carefully. Cut off the stems. Place a spoonful of filling on a grape leaf and proceed as recipe directs, above. The other recipe also suggested substituting a 1/4 cup of minced fresh dill for the parsley.

                      Edit 4/3/2014: Cold cooked rice has a lot of resistant starch. See Mark's posts:The Definitive Guide to Resistant Starch and Resistant Starch: Your Questions Answered
                      Last edited by Antiochia; 04-03-2014, 06:48 AM.
                      Ruth

                      See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

                      Comment


                      • For curry recipes, check out this thread:

                        in need of curry recipe page

                        Looks like there are some good ones there!
                        Ruth

                        See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

                        Comment


                        • This recipe looks good for a fish/wine/oil day -- from Coconut Milk Chicken Curry Recipe | cocos.us

                          FISH IN COCONUT MILK

                          Ingredients:
                          (Whole) Fish – 1 Kg (about 2-1/4 lbs - probably about a little less than 2 lbs of cleaned fish)
                          Coconut milk – 400 ml (about 1-3/4 cups)
                          Dry white wine – 100 ml (between 1/3 and 1/2 cup)
                          Lime – 1
                          Soy sauce – 3 teaspoons
                          Chilli – 2
                          Bunch cilantro – 1
                          Salt, pepper to taste
                          Number of servings: 3-4

                          Clear fish out from the innards. Chili pepper is cut into thin rings.
                          Remove the zest with half a lime, from the same half squeeze the juice.
                          Mix coconut milk, dry wine, lime juice, zest, soy sauce and chili.
                          In heatproof form put our fish, pour with the prepared mixture. Tighten the form of food film (plastic wrap), put in the refrigerator and let it marinate for 2-3 hours. (Remove plastic wrap)Then bake for about 35 minutes at 200 degrees and serve with fresh cilantro.
                          Last edited by Antiochia; 09-25-2013, 06:01 AM.
                          Ruth

                          See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by kingofbaconandeggs
                            Blasphemy! Burn her, she is a witch. Lol.
                            Lol! Better than being a troll! :P

                            Here is Mark's take on occasional rice:

                            "There is nuance to all things. Though categorization is a valuable, essential data management tool, one that helped propel us to the top of the food chain (grouping bits of data together into categories allows us to handle more mental “stuff” at once), we run the risk of forgetting that these groups are made up of individual, non-homogenous bits. There is danger in missing the trees for the forest. Rice is a grain, yes, but it’s not the same as wheat, barley, oats, or corn. Avoiding grains as a general rule is good for your health, and that goes for rice, but be realistic. A bit of white rice with a restaurant meal is not going to kill you.

                            Don’t take this as blanket approval for immediate regular rice consumption, however. It’s not black and white. Rice exists on one end of the “grain suitability” continuum. You know how I’ve discussed the dairy continuum? Raw, grass-fed one on end and low-fat, homogenized, ultra-pasteurized on the other. It’s the same for grains. High-gluten wheat on one (very bad) end and rice on the other (don’t lose sleep if you eat it) end. Do I recommend ditching the entire group altogether, just to make things easy and avoid any possible irritants? Sure, but if grain consumption presents itself, or you literally are hamstrung by finances and simply need some calories, you shouldn’t beat yourself up over it just because you ate some white rice."


                            Read more: Is Rice Unhealthy? | Mark's Daily Apple
                            Ruth

                            See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

                            Comment


                            • This link has very clear instructions on how to make your own almond butter:
                              How To Make Homemade Almond Butter « Detoxinista
                              Ruth

                              See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

                              Comment


                              • Well, our Advent starts on November 15th, only a few weeks away. With that in mind, here is another fish recipe:

                                MANHATTAN COD CHOWDER

                                1 tablespoon coconut oil
                                1/2 cup thinly sliced onions
                                1 cup thinly sliced celery
                                8 oz. bottle of clam juice
                                1-1/4 cup water
                                1 teaspoon vegetable broth seasoning
                                1/2 teaspoon thyme
                                1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
                                1/4 teaspoon pepper
                                1 14.5-oz can cut up tomatoes
                                1 cup cauliflower (cut into small florets)
                                8 oz. frozen cod, thawed, cut in cubes
                                1 tablespoon rice vinegar
                                Piece of Kombu (a kind of seaweed) - optional

                                Directions:
                                Saute the onions and celery until cooked and tender. Add clam juice, water, broth seasoning, spices and Kombu if using. Simmer for about 10 minutes. Add tomatoes and cauliflower and bring back to a simmer and add the cod. Cook for 10 more minutes. Stir in the vinegar. If you used Kombu, remove it before serving.

                                This makes about 5 cups of soup. Usually my husband and I just split this recipe so it really only makes about 2 servings.

                                Nutritional information per cup of soup: Calories: 102.3; Fat: 3.3g; Carbohydrates: 6.6g; Protein: 12.0g

                                Note: If your body can handle the carbs, you can substitute diced potato for the cauliflower. Add the potato when you add the clam juice and water.
                                Last edited by Antiochia; 10-27-2013, 02:18 PM.
                                Ruth

                                See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

                                Comment

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