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What to do with a jar of bacon drippings?

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  • What to do with a jar of bacon drippings?

    When I cook bacon in a pan, I use what's left to cook eggs in it, but whatever is left over (or if I don't use the fat at all), I pour it in a mason jar next to my stove so the pan is easier to clean later.

    So, what can I do with all of this now-somewhat-hardened grease that I've accumulated over time? Once in a while I will use it to grease my pan if all I'm making is eggs, but is there any other use for this jar of deliciousness?

    Thanks!
    >> Current Stats: 90% Primal / 143 lbs / ~25% BF
    >> Goal (by 1 Jan 2014): 90% Primal / 135-ish pounds / 20-22% BF

    >> Upcoming Fitness Feats: Tough Mudder, June 2013
    >> Check out my super-exciting journal by clicking these words.

    Weight does NOT equal health -- ditch the scale, don't be a slave to it!

  • #2
    Ok... let's just imagine that "Butter" and "Bacon Fat" are having this conversation about savory cooking applications...


    Now you see?
    Think of a place the very mild taste of bacon might be welcome, minus a lot of salt, and go with it!
    I love bacon fat with brussels sprouts!
    Last edited by cori93437; 02-18-2013, 04:39 PM.
    “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
    ~Friedrich Nietzsche
    And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.

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    • #3
      I have a similar jar in my cupboard. If you strain your bacon fat before storing it, you don't have to keep it in the fridge. Bacon fat is a delicious way to make practically any vegetable taste wonderful, especially cruciferous vegetables such as brussels sprouts, broccoli, and cabbage. Just use the bacon fat to sauté them or as the fat in the steam/sauté method. I also use it to fry onions for chili, chowder, soup, and anything that calls for bacon, then frying something in the left over fat. Stir-fried cabbage! oh yummy!! It's also good substitute for the oil or butter called for in corn bread. Corn bread is not Paleo! but, once in awhile, you just have to have it.

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      • #4
        homemade mayonnaise. just warm the fat till liquid and proceed with any recipe. makes really rich mayo

        Introducing: A Recipe Contest, With Prizes - NYTimes.com

        it's easiest to use a hand- held blender to make mayo, put the watery ingredients at the bottom and the fat on top
        Natural products super cheap @ iherb: Use discount code SEN850 at http://www.iherb.com/?rcode=sen850 for $10 off first order; free shipping $20+ order in USA

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        • #5
          Bacon fat?? in the UK...all that comes out of my bacon is water and preservatives....no useful fat there....really need to stop shopping at the supermarket.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by fuzzynavel View Post
            Bacon fat?? in the UK...all that comes out of my bacon is water and preservatives....no useful fat there....really need to stop shopping at the supermarket.
            You could just buy lard?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by CavemanJoe View Post
              You could just buy lard?
              I've got grass fed butter, ghee and coconut oil.....Think my Fat requirements for cooking may be covered

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              • #8
                Originally posted by fuzzynavel View Post
                Bacon fat?? in the UK...all that comes out of my bacon is water and preservatives....no useful fat there....really need to stop shopping at the supermarket.
                The bacon we get in the US is a different product from that you buy in the UK. It is made from pork belly, and is more than half fat.

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                • #9
                  are you looking for strictly food-related answers? if yes, i use it on cooked veggies, roast veggies or potatoes in it, use it to make dressings, etc

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                  • #10
                    I love the idea of using it to make dressings/mayonnaise! I love love love mayo but never buy it anymore because even the "olive oil" ones are mostly made with soybean or canola oil. I do make my own sometimes, but it uses a lot of olive oil and can get expensive. Using leftover bacon grease sounds like a nice way of using a waste product to make something delicious!
                    >> Current Stats: 90% Primal / 143 lbs / ~25% BF
                    >> Goal (by 1 Jan 2014): 90% Primal / 135-ish pounds / 20-22% BF

                    >> Upcoming Fitness Feats: Tough Mudder, June 2013
                    >> Check out my super-exciting journal by clicking these words.

                    Weight does NOT equal health -- ditch the scale, don't be a slave to it!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I use lard and tallow to sauté food. I also use butter, ghee and coconut oil of course, depending on the recipe (thai curry doesn't work with lard :P ). You can do pretty much the same with your drippings, just make sure that the taste matches the recipe: it is way stronger than plain lard.

                      However... I find it hard to believe that you keep it in a jar, me too I cook bacon and soon after eggs in the same pan, but in the end I pour the liquid fat onto the eggs!

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                      • #12
                        HERE is how to make super easy mayo with any liquid fat:

                        Homemade Mayonnaise in 2 Minutes or Less - YouTube

                        done this myself, hand held ftw, super simple and fast, pretty much can't fail and is easier to clean up than a blender. bacon fat is epic; beef fat is super rich !

                        and more here: Homemade Paleo Mayo Cooking Demo - Everyday Paleo

                        PS the mustard is optional, and imo the water is too, you can just add the whole egg and the water in the egg white acts the same way, it just might make it a bit foamy at first. The lemon juice may be substituted with any type of vinegar as well. The two non-optional ingredients are the egg and the oil, everything else is flavor. The lecithin in the egg stabilizes the emulsion of the fat in the water of the egg.

                        what to do with the mayo - put it on cabbage for coleslaw; on red potatoes for a salad, add in blue cheese for salad/meat dressing ( which is something I need to start doing because I loooove blue cheese dressing on buffalo-sauced meat but the conventional off the shelf kind is chock-full of not good for you stuff and the Marie's refrigerated kind is too expensive for the large daily quantity I consume... ).
                        Natural products super cheap @ iherb: Use discount code SEN850 at http://www.iherb.com/?rcode=sen850 for $10 off first order; free shipping $20+ order in USA

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                        • #13
                          When my boyfriend feels like having bacon as a snack, I have him put a cover on the pan afterwards, and it gets used in the next meal. Tonight I steamed broccoli and tossed it in the hot bacon frying pan. Miraculously, all the baconfat disappeared from the pan.

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