Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Do you strain your yogurt/kefir?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Do you strain your yogurt/kefir?

    Anybody strain their homemade yogurt or milk kefir?
    What do you do with the whey you get?

    Just curious to know what others do with it

  • #2
    When I was making yogurt, no, I didn't. Not much whey was produced when I got it all right, anyway. If the yogurt didn't incubate correctly (got too cold while it was supposed to be staying around 100F for 8-12 hours), it would be clumpy and mostly whey. In that case, I'd still eat it all.

    I've read that some people will add it to smoothies since there's plenty of good nutrition in it. You could also bake with it (use it instead of water or some other liquids).
    Depression Lies

    Comment


    • #3
      I use kefir mostly in smoothies, so I stir the whey back in. But I make cheese occasionally, which produces a lot of whey. I've used it instead of water in cooking, but that doesn't come close to using it up. So usually I end up pouring it on my vegetable garden, figuring that way the nutrition in it doesn't go completely to waste.
      __________________________
      age 56, type 2 diabetes, swimmer
      low carb since 2006 thanks to Jenny, primal since Jan. 2012

      Comment


      • #4
        If you eat beans or things like buckwheat, it is good for soaking them in to reduce anti nutrients.

        Comment


        • #5
          Guess what? I am going to do exactly that, this week. I've still got some dried black beans that I had bought before I became primal. I was curious to check if somebody had the same idea. Apparently yes
          I regularly use the filtered whey to control the fermentation of cabbage, for real homemade sauerkraut. It takes a couple of weeks before it's ready but the taste is...

          Anybody every tried to do sourdough with kefir whey instead of plain water?
          Last edited by primal_alex; 01-21-2013, 09:38 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            I'd imagine that would kick-start the starter, since there's going to be a host of bacteria and or yeasts still in the whey. I am curious to see just how that'd turn out, actually. I'm planning to begin my own home-made starter sometime soon and was wondering what different effects could be achieved with some kind of liquid additive. At the time, I was thinking pu'er tea, but I'm not sure just how much of the fermentating organisms remain after proper infusion.

            M.

            Comment


            • #7
              I use the whey for lacto-fermentation. I make my own coleslaw using it. It's supposed to add a lot of good stuff into your gut. I throw some of the coleslaw onto my salad.

              Comment


              • #8
                Good idea; while making dinner tonight I was reminded of this whey-using recipe:

                Real Food 101: How to Make Lacto-Fermented Ketchup | OUR NOURISHING ROOTS

                M.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by MEversbergII View Post
                  At the time, I was thinking pu'er tea, but I'm not sure just how much of the fermentating organisms remain after proper infusion.
                  M.
                  I guess none... it is sufficient to bring water (or milk) to 70 C for 5 minutes to sterilize it.

                  However yes, drinking it is indeed another option I considered: I add some stevia and cool it. I guess the whey you get from strained yogurt is the same kind of proteins you get in the Whey! powdered proteins, while the cheese cream is caseins instead.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by MEversbergII View Post
                    Good idea; while making dinner tonight I was reminded of this whey-using recipe:

                    Real Food 101: How to Make Lacto-Fermented Ketchup | OUR NOURISHING ROOTS

                    M.
                    Great website, thanks!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by primal_alex View Post
                      Guess what? I am going to do exactly that, this week. I've still got some dried black beans that I had bought before I became primal. I was curious to check if somebody had the same idea. Apparently yes
                      I regularly use the filtered whey to control the fermentation of cabbage, for real homemade sauerkraut. It takes a couple of weeks before it's ready but the taste is...

                      Anybody every tried to do sourdough with kefir whey instead of plain water?
                      I've made sauerkraut a couple of times using whey - and I MUCH prefer it with just salt. This link is an interesting take on this

                      Why I Don’t Use Whey as a Vegetable Fermentation Starter The Liberated Kitchen, LLC

                      I'm fermenting some buckwheat with kefir (not whey, the whole kefir) just now to make crepes. After an overnight ferment, it is risen and bulked up like sourdough bread does. Fascinating!

                      With beans, I soak in water for 6 - 8 hours, tip into colander and rinse, put back into bowl and cover with a mix of whey and water to cover or kefir and water to cover and leave overnight before cooking - usually in a pressure cooker. I don't know if it truly does destroy anti nutrients - but they taste good and I have no adverse after effects!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by breadsauce View Post
                        I'm fermenting some buckwheat with kefir (not whey, the whole kefir) just now to make crepes. After an overnight ferment, it is risen and bulked up like sourdough bread does. Fascinating!
                        That looks interesting, thanks for sharing.

                        Are you using buckwheat in grains or flour? Will you add eggs and yeast, too, before cooking or kefir+buckwheat are enough?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by primal_alex View Post
                          That looks interesting, thanks for sharing.

                          Are you using buckwheat in grains or flour? Will you add eggs and yeast, too, before cooking or kefir+buckwheat are enough?
                          This 1st effort is an experiment using several recipes when googling "fermented buckwheat crepes". i have 1 cup buckwheat flour fermenting with 1 cup kefir, which I began yesterday evening at 6.00 pm. Tomorrow morning I will add 1 beaten egg, 1 cup of milk, salt and a half teaspoon of baking powder. Then cook "pancakes" in a cast iron frying pan and see what happens.

                          If it is good - fine. If, as I suspect, it is slightly "brittle" then the next attempt will add a tablespoon of tapioca flour with the egg, milk etc. I normally WOULDN"T add baking powder, but it was mentioned in so many recipes that I thought I'd try it for the 1st time!

                          I'll post to let you know if the results are good, bad or in indifferent!!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            @primal_alex

                            Well, I cooked some of the crepes. Flavour - excellent. Texture - as I suspected, brittle and hard to "flip" over - some squashed up a bit and were a bit undercooked. Looked lovely, with little holes like a crumpet. I think I can either make them with thicker batter and reasonably thick pancakes, but cook for longer on a lower heat, or have a slightly thinner batter, make thinner pancakes and cook quite fast for a shorter time.

                            I'm going to add another egg, a tablespoon of tapioca flour and enough milk to make the remaining batter slightly thinner - like single (thin) cream. And I shall put less batter in the pan, so it is thinner.

                            But the flavour is excellent. I think 24 hours fermenting will be enough; mine were fermented 36 hours.

                            The measurements I did make a lot of batter - I made 4 pancakes and there is a load of batter left over!!
                            Last edited by breadsauce; 01-24-2013, 05:38 AM. Reason: erratic typing!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              If you strain yogurt for a couple of hours, don't you get Greek style yogurt? If you strain it overnight, you get yogurt cheese?

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X