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Cooking Steak In Oven: I need to tell you that

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  • #16
    I found the BEST technique to roast chickens and the easiest ever...will never go back it's so good. You pre-heat a big fry pan (or dutch) in a 450 oven. While you're doing that, you cover chicken in whatever you like (lots of olive oil, celtic sea salt, pepper, herbs, touch of wine). When hot, place trussed chicken breast side up right onto pan (it will start cooking immediately). Put back in oven for 30 mins (4lb chx - adjust a few minutes either way for lbs - like 35 mins for 5 lb, etc). Then, turn oven OFF (don't open) and leave chx in for another 30 mins (adjust for lbs). Take out and remove chx from pan to a dish, tent with foil and let rest for 20 mins. This is the best part...there will be drippings in the pan that you then leave on stove and reduce. Add wine and broth and keep reducing a tad to intensify flavor. This makes literally the best roast chicken ever. Very moist, never overcooked, crispy skin. Beautiful gravy. Enjoy!

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    • #17
      Steak, you clip its horns, wipe its butt, and send it on in. I like my steaks rare.

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      • #18
        Wow, good suggestions, will have to try them all. Well, not the rare one, lol.
        Thx for posting, Artem, your pics look great.

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        • #19
          Cooking a tri-tip roast in the oven tonight. 10 minutes at 550 degrees, 20 minutes at 350, then under the broiler till there's a crusty edge (about 5-10 minutes). Remove from oven, let sit 20 minutes, carve. Always comes out medium-rare in the middle and well-done on the thinner edges so everyone in the family is happy.
          See what I'm up to: The Primal Gardener

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Wulf View Post
            I saw a blog post about cooking whole chickens or large beef roasts in the crock pot, no additional water needed: the trick is to put the meat on top of a bed of chopped onion and cook on low. I believe with this method, the onion supplies enough water content to get it cooking and keep it from burning.
            I did a whole chicken in a crockpot a week or 2 ago with no water. Lined the bottom with onion, celery, and a ton of garlic (about 3 heads of garlic), seasoned it with fresh thyme, parsley and sage, and some dried oregano. The chicken was so juicy, but didn't carry the flavour of garlic onion or celery. When I took the chicken out of the crockpot, one of the legs just fell off.

            Overall though, I can't be bothered to do a whole chicken in there again though. The meat was juicy and tender, but the flavour was pretty "meh".

            As for roasts, I usually do it with a bit of beef broth.

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            • #21
              I cook everything like a pot roast: low temp, lid on, sometimes with some exta liquid in the pot, but not always.
              My Walk From West Coast to East Coast

              http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread81011.html

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              • #22
                How I cook pork chops, lamb chops or chicken thighs:

                In a roasting dish put carrots, pumpkin, kumara, onions cut into chunks.
                Layer the chops on top.
                Season with salt, pepper, lemon, herbs eg rosemary, mint or basil.
                Tip over a can of pineapple pieces including the juice.
                Cover and bake at 150C for about an hour.

                Remove cover, cook a bit longer if there is too much liquid, it will soon evaporate. But not too much longer or everything will dry out, stick to the pan and burn.

                The meat is usually tender but nicely browned and the veges soak up the fat. Yum.
                Annie Ups the Ante
                http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread117711.html

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