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  • smelts recipe?

    I just picked up a pound of smelts, and i've been scouring the web and these forums for a non-fried recipe. Mark recently mentioned these as a great food, but didn't link us to any recipes. Anyone have any suggestions? thanks!

  • #2
    Well, the way I used to make smelts was to drop them into some seasoned flour and then quick-fry them in olive oil. They fry up quickly, about a minute, but don't overcrowd the pan - do it in batches.

    You might try using almond flour with seasoning (S&P, maybe a hit of cayenne). If it doesn't seem to adhere, you may need to dip in egg wash first (egg + some water or milk), then into the flour.

    You could also try patting the smelts dry, seasoning them directly, and frying without any flour.

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    • #3
      thanks. that is kind of what I was thinking, but using coconut flour. I was also thinking about leaving some of them uncoated to see which way I liked them better. they are so small, I don't think there is much else to do with them.


      Originally posted by Finnegans Wake View Post
      Well, the way I used to make smelts was to drop them into some seasoned flour and then quick-fry them in olive oil. They fry up quickly, about a minute, but don't overcrowd the pan - do it in batches.

      You might try using almond flour with seasoning (S&P, maybe a hit of cayenne). If it doesn't seem to adhere, you may need to dip in egg wash first (egg + some water or milk), then into the flour.

      You could also try patting the smelts dry, seasoning them directly, and frying without any flour.

      Comment


      • #4
        I once just baked some alongside okra. Super simple. Kind of a play on fish sticks and french fries. Finger food : )
        Pan-fried sounds better though!

        photo4_zpsba28f495.jpg

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        • #5
          Smoke them pretty hard and eat them whole. That is my favorite way to eat eulachon (an anadromous smelt from NW north america).

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          • #6
            I like to just coat them with coconut oil, sprinkle with salt and seasonings, and pop them under the broiler. Roasty, toasty little fishes.

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            • #7
              20130109_205413.jpg

              well, i tried!

              they actually look better than they were (scary, huh?), though they weren't horrible. I used the coconut flour and pan fried them in olive oil. I couldn't get them crispy enough. And the oil in the pan, kept becoming this sticky, gunky mess since I was doing them in batches. I think they would have been better just seasoned and pan fried without the flour. I should have done it both ways, as I was originally thinking. Though, Diana, your suggestion of broiling them probably would have been better too.

              They needed something after they were done to make them edible. So i whipped up the homemade "remoulade" sauce. Really just mayo, home-fermented chopped pickles, hot sauce, lemon juice, s & p.

              Thanks for your suggestions.

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              • #8
                I haven't tried it - but I read earlier in the week to dip them in beaten egg white, dredge with seasoned tapioca flour and fry as though "normal" wheat flour. It is supposed to come out crisp, like whitebait.... Something that I AM planning to do, though. Might make Chicken Kiev primal...!!

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                • #9
                  I'm jealous, having been smelting yet........
                  You'll never see the light if you're in someone else's shadow, or said another way, life is like a dog sled team, if you're not the lead dog, the scenery never changes

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                  • #10
                    Pickled smelt are delicious!!
                    Using low lectin/nightshade free primal to control autoimmune arthritis. (And lost 50 lbs along the way )

                    http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html

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                    • #11
                      I almost forgot to come back and give you guys an update...

                      I could only eat 1/2 lb the first night, so i had some left over. I took the left over 1/2 lb and threw them on my outdoor grill in one of those veggie pans so they wouldn't fall through the grates. I put just a rub down of oil on the pan to keep them from sticking. I heated them up that way. This time they turned out crisp and toasty and smokey. Much, much better (though I still think they needed my "remoulade.")

                      So, my guess is that I used too much oil and not enough heat on my attempt with pan frying, and that's what made them soggy. The fault lied with the chef, not the coconut flour.


                      Originally posted by lev96 View Post
                      [ATTACH]10421[/ATTACH]

                      well, i tried!

                      they actually look better than they were (scary, huh?), though they weren't horrible. I used the coconut flour and pan fried them in olive oil. I couldn't get them crispy enough. And the oil in the pan, kept becoming this sticky, gunky mess since I was doing them in batches. I think they would have been better just seasoned and pan fried without the flour. I should have done it both ways, as I was originally thinking. Though, Diana, your suggestion of broiling them probably would have been better too.

                      They needed something after they were done to make them edible. So i whipped up the homemade "remoulade" sauce. Really just mayo, home-fermented chopped pickles, hot sauce, lemon juice, s & p.

                      Thanks for your suggestions.

                      Comment

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