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uses for beef bone broth

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  • uses for beef bone broth

    I made some bone broth and it's pretty good. I'm wondering what I can use it for rather than just drinking it.

  • #2
    Soup base... most fancy restaurants make their own fstaring with bone broth.
    -Ryan Mercer my blog and Genco Peptides my small biz

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    • #3
      Anything in cooking with beef that calls for beef broth or water, use your bone broth.
      Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, steak in one hand, chocolate in the other, yelling "Holy F***, What a Ride!"
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      • #4
        Poached eggs.
        "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

        B*tch-lite

        Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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        • #5
          I often reduce it by almost half, then freeze in ice cube trays, storing in a ziplok bag in the freezer. Anything you're cooking that could use a bit of extra liquid, toss in a cube or three, with added flavor. Great with ground beef/veg mixtures.
          My musings

          The old stuff

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          • #6
            I cooked some pot roast with beef broth comprising most of the liquid recently. It also makes great chili and soups as mentioned above.

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            • #7
              Pho! Mmm...loads of sliced beef, veggies, who needs noodles?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by naiadknight View Post
                Anything in cooking with beef that calls for beef broth or water, use your bone broth.
                This.

                Making taco meat? Add in some bone broth along with your spices.

                Make a quick au jus-like sauce by reducing bone broth with coconut aminos, salt, garlic, onion powder (optional), and pepper. Reduce until the flavor is as strong as you like.

                Make a quick gravy by reducing bone broth with heavy cream or wine and seasonings. May need a thickener like arrowroot powder or egg yolks to get the desired consistency.

                Add leftover meat and veggies for a quick soup.

                With green beans the way Mark does: Are Peas and Green Beans Healthy? | Mark's Daily Apple

                I've even reduced it down with lots of garlic till it was very strong and drizzled it over a salad for a meaty flavored "dressing".
                See what I'm up to: The Primal Gardener

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                • #9
                  yeah,i like eat, Anything in cooking with beef that calls for beef broth or water, use your bone broth.thanks for your sharing

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                  • #10
                    HELP! Ok, I'm new here and can't figure out how to start a new thread. I will be getting a call today from the processor on how I want my beef cut. What bones should I ask for to make bone broth? What size packages? Is there any particular way I should request that they be handled or processed?

                    I am very lucky in that I am getting a whole, mostly grass-fed beef from my landlord to share with my sons. It was butchered last Saturday and is being dry-aged. The plant will be calling today for cutting and packaging instructions and the only bones I've ever gotten before are soup-bones (ox-tail). Anyone with help or advice would be appreciated.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Dodo View Post
                      HELP! Ok, I'm new here and can't figure out how to start a new thread. I will be getting a call today from the processor on how I want my beef cut. What bones should I ask for to make bone broth? What size packages? Is there any particular way I should request that they be handled or processed?

                      I am very lucky in that I am getting a whole, mostly grass-fed beef from my landlord to share with my sons. It was butchered last Saturday and is being dry-aged. The plant will be calling today for cutting and packaging instructions and the only bones I've ever gotten before are soup-bones (ox-tail). Anyone with help or advice would be appreciated.
                      Ask for the neckbones. They are great for stock. The shin bones also work really well if they still have the meat attached. As a bonus they often contain a signficant amount of marrow and can be used for osso bucco. I have heard the hoof is the ultimate gelatin bomb, but the hoof was not included with my half cow.

                      I like having my bones in somewhat smaller packs (like 1lb or so). This makes it easy to roast them on sheet pans even if they aren't completey thawed. If you plan ahead and thaw a few days in advance, having a larger pack is no problem though.

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                      • #12
                        Be sure and ask for the knuckles and the hocks, basically all the leg joints. If they are willing to give you all the joints (like the backbone) that aren't part of other cuts I would snatch them up. Basically, see if you can get every bone possible. Joint bones will have more cartilage and thus more gelatin-making ability but all bones will make bone broth.
                        See what I'm up to: The Primal Gardener

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Kaylee99 View Post
                          Be sure and ask for the knuckles and the hocks, basically all the leg joints. If they are willing to give you all the joints (like the backbone) that aren't part of other cuts I would snatch them up. Basically, see if you can get every bone possible. Joint bones will have more cartilage and thus more gelatin-making ability but all bones will make bone broth.
                          Yes! How could I forget the knuckle!? I did have one in my order that I used in the first batch of broth I made from this cow. It was amazing.

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                          • #14
                            Greensprout has the right idea. Freezing in ice cube trays works really well for whatever liquid you need to save - open wine, olive oil with herbs, stock..

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                            • #15
                              I'm glad this thread is here because I just made a batch of beef bone stock that turned out to have a weird color. I roasted the bones first and ate the marrow out of half of them, then made stock as usual. I even added a diced skillet steak for extra flavor, but it came out so pale, even lighter than the chicken stock I'd made a few days earlier. Anyone know what's going on?

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