Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Duck Duck Duck question :)

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Duck Duck Duck question :)

    I found a recipe here for crispy duck that I am considering making for my family when I go home for the holiday. I figure if I volunteer to make the meat part of the meal then at least I know where THAT came from...and I don't much care for turkey.

    Is a 4.25 pound duck enough for 3 adults? I am thinking it might not be so I might take a ham instead but I wanted to ask the question. I've never cooked, or eaten, duck before and it looks pretty small to me. I might want to keep it for ME I don't have a good idea how much meat a duck of that size produces. I would LOVE to take a goose instead, but that is well outside of my budget.

  • #2
    My only experience is with duck legs. A lot of (fanfreakintastic) fat is rendered down when you cook duck, so I don't know how much of a whole bird would be left.

    Hopefully someone will know more.
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

    B*tch-lite

    Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

    Comment


    • #3
      sounds about the same size as a med chicken so based on that?... seems it would be ok for 4 smaller portion sized (this coming from someone who eats 1/2 a roast chicken with ease)
      Every time I hear the dirty word 'exercise', I wash my mouth out with chocolate.

      http://primaldog.blogspot.co.uk/

      Comment


      • #4
        Duck has a lot more fat than chicken though, I think that just to be safe I will get a ham from Whole Foods and save the duck for me. My family would think me very odd to want to save the fat and bones anyway...

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Catrin View Post
          save the duck for me.
          I actually wanted to post that, but thought you would think I wasn't taking your question seriously. I'd keep that duck and probably get two meals out of it and then cook everything I made for the next week in the rendered fat. Seriously, I have a container of duck fat in my fridge and I even reheated salmon in it the other night. My neighbor eats the stuff right off a spoon.

          If I thought it would work in Bulletproof coffee, I'd even use it in that, but it keeps a bit of the meaty taste.
          "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

          B*tch-lite

          Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

          Comment


          • #6
            It will be enough for three people but do not expect leftovers and prepare some side dishes so you and your guests can fill up.

            Red cabbage with apple and raisin - Morrisons - I love this but my version also has mustard seeds and red wine (in addition to red wine vinegar). A bit on the sweet side (it's not so good without the sugar, actually) but decidedly delicious.

            Comment


            • #7
              I appreciate the comments, thanks! I am still leaning to leaving the duck in my freezer for New Years, and taking either a small ham or pick up three cornish hens from Whole Foods and cooking that instead.

              The red cabbage recipe looks pretty good! I don't typically eat raisins, but I bet dried cherries would be quite good in this recipe.

              Comment


              • #8
                When cooking duck, my rule is always 1/2 duck per person.

                Especially when doing a recipe like crispy duck where the whole thing will be completely cooked and rendered.

                Often I cook breasts separately and rare (I LOVE rare duck breast)... then use the quarters for long cooks and remaining carcass for stock.
                I do love my ducks.
                “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
                ~Friedrich Nietzsche
                And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.

                Comment


                • #9
                  May I ask what you all think is a good per pound price for a whole duck? Just breasts? Just legs? Any and all help would be appreciated. Thanx!
                  "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

                  B*tch-lite

                  Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I think that will be fine for 3 people. Plenty of veg etc though! I usually do 2 x duck for 6 and it is enough. Rarely much left over though! And the bones make a wonderful stock.

                    I tend to roast long and slow, (2.5 - 3 hours) on a medium heat, to render the fat out - which is super to use later for roasting potatoes etc. If you prick the skin all over in many places with a skewer or fork, especially underneath where you can see fatty deposits, it helps the fat to run out. I have a large roasting tin with a fitted rack which allows the two ducks to sit suspended above the fat which is draining out - adding some boiling water to the tin periodically helps prevent the fat from burning, which can spoil it for cooking with later.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      It's definitely cheaper if you buy the whole duck, and then you get all that great fat and bones (to make stock with later). I found whole duck at a local "natural" grocery store for under $3/lb, but after doing a little research I discovered that the duck was from a large industrial duck factory in Canada where the ducks are fed primarily corn and soy, have no access to water (or natural food sources), and are kept in pretty cramped conditions. It was very tasty, but I probably won't buy that brand again. A decent sized whole duck at Whole foods is likely to run about $25, which sounds like a lot, but you can get a couple of meals for two out of it in addition to the fat and bones. Breasts and legs can get really pricey, like $15-$20/lb, so I generally only buy those when they are on sale (which is almost never). You might try looking around for a local farm that sells whole fresh ducks.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X