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Homemade ricotta ... And leftover whey?

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  • Homemade ricotta ... And leftover whey?

    So I made my 1st batch of homemade ricotta this weekend for an eggplant lasagna. Super easy and it was so delicious.
    Double batch quantities here to result in two cups of ricotta.

    6 cups whole milk
    2 cups heavy cream
    1 tsp salt

    Combine in pot, bring to 190 degrees F or to a very gentle simmer, stirring all the while to keep from scalding. Once at the right temp (and this is quick), remove from heat and add 6 teaspoons lemon juice and let sit for 5 minutes. Place two to three layers of cheesecloth in a strainer over a deep bowl, and pour the milk/cream/lemon juice mix into the cheese cloth. Let sit for one hour for soft curds, two hours for a more cream cheese texture.

    It is delicious - everyone said it was the best lasagna they'd had - you could definitely taste the difference in the ricotta. I used it after straining for 90 minutes and it had a hint of lemony flavor from the lemon juice. If. I waited two hours, it would be perfect for cheesecake.

    This was so easy to do but here is my question . . . What to do with all of the whey left over? I know I should something but I am not sure what. Does anyone have ideas?

  • #2
    Nourishing Traditions Cookbook uses the whey in lacto-fermenting vegetables and in condiments to keep them fresher longer (mayo, ketchup etc). I give it to my chickens when I think of it. Thanks for the recipe.

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    • #3
      Make more cheese!!!
      How To Make Great Ricotta Cheese From Whey


      Or, drink it in smoothies, for added protein. Some people add it to recipes of baked goods in olace of the liquid for addded nutrition, but I don't eat that stuff.
      Last edited by camel; 10-17-2012, 08:51 AM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Ferti View Post
        Nourishing Traditions Cookbook uses the whey in lacto-fermenting vegetables and in condiments to keep them fresher longer (mayo, ketchup etc). I give it to my chickens when I think of it. Thanks for the recipe.
        I think that the good bacteria is not alive in cooked whey, so it would not have the fermenting ability anymore.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by camel View Post
          I think that the good bacteria is not alive in cooked whey, so it would not have the fermenting ability anymore.
          Wasn't thinking about it being cooked, only thought about whey. Very right.

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          • #6
            I've never attempted to make my own cheese. I always thought it would be too hard.

            And if its as good as it sounds, I'll probably just attack it with a spoon
            http://meatsleeprepeat.com/
            http://ternioncrossfit.com/

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            • #7
              Hi Zanna,

              Thanks so much for the recipe! When you say:
              add 6 teaspoons lemon juice and let sit
              Do you stir the lemon juice into the whole mixture and let it sit, or do you literally just add it and wait (without stirring)?

              Editing to add:
              When you say:
              Double batch quantities here to result in two cups of ricotta.
              Do you mean the recipe you're giving yields one cup of ricotta, and to double it if we want two cups.

              In other words: Eight cups of milk and cream yields one cup of ricotta???

              Terez
              Last edited by Terez; 10-17-2012, 06:33 PM. Reason: to ask about quantities

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Terez View Post
                Hi Zanna,

                Thanks so much for the recipe! When you say: Do you stir the lemon juice into the whole mixture and let it sit, or do you literally just add it and wait (without stirring)?

                Yes, you add the lemon juice and gently stir until incorporated. Very gently stir it, you don't want to re-integrate the curds and whey that separated during the cooking.

                Editing to add:
                When you say: Do you mean the recipe you're giving yields one cup of ricotta, and to double it if we want two cups.

                In other words: Eight cups of milk and cream yields one cup of ricotta???

                Terez
                My recipe is doubled, to get 2 cups yield of ricotta. Original recipe called for 3 cups whole milk, 1 cup cream and 3 tablespoons lemon juice. I needed to double it to have enough for lasagna and an appetizer.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by camel View Post
                  That's a great idea - make more cheese!

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                  • #10
                    Interesting. Did you use citric acid? I have a whole bottle, unopened, that I could use. I'm assuming you used lemon juice because you didn't have powdered citric acid?
                    Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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                    • #11
                      you can make really nice leek and potato soup with it, if you eat potatoes. but i am sure you could add it to other soups like pumpkin soup. you could also make gjetost. i googled a recipe here Homemade Gjetost Recipe

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Ferti View Post
                        Nourishing Traditions Cookbook uses the whey in lacto-fermenting vegetables and in condiments to keep them fresher longer (mayo, ketchup etc). I give it to my chickens when I think of it. Thanks for the recipe.
                        I do like to use whey in mayonnaise to make it keep longer, but I don't like sauerkraut with whey in it - much prefer the flavour of it made straight, with salt only. The 2 times I've tried the Nourishing Traditions method the kraut had a peculiar funky taste which I didn't like.

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                        • #13
                          Soup is probably the best use, or if you need more liquid in a smoothie. If you are very ambitious freeze it in ice cube trays and use those ice cubes in smoothies. Use it as cooking water for rice if you eat any. But I have trouble finding ways to use it up (and don't have pets), so I pour it on my garden so it doesn't go completely to waste.
                          __________________________
                          age 56, type 2 diabetes, swimmer
                          low carb since 2006 thanks to Jenny, primal since Jan. 2012

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
                            Interesting. Did you use citric acid? I have a whole bottle, unopened, that I could use. I'm assuming you used lemon juice because you didn't have powdered citric acid?
                            Hi Choco - I don't have citric acid, but I prefer to use lemon juice anyway. And that's what the recipe called for

                            ETA . . . I think you could use the citric acid if that's what you have. You can use it in other recipes that call for an acid, like making tomato sauce to be canned in a water bath.
                            Last edited by Zanna; 10-19-2012, 08:10 AM.

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                            • #15
                              I just had a great idea! I used whey to make Crio Bru brewed chocolate, cowboy coffee style (simmered on the stove)
                              __________________________
                              age 56, type 2 diabetes, swimmer
                              low carb since 2006 thanks to Jenny, primal since Jan. 2012

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