Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Primal lunch box quandry

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Primal lunch box quandry

    Hi all.
    So heres the thing. My kids lunch boxes.
    Its easy for me to change my diet etc. Its relatively easy for me to change all the breakfasts and dinners, but the kids school lunchboxes are a bit of a sticky point.
    Apart from changing their lunches to something different, theres the 'cool' elements and the peer comments at school.
    Obviously junk food with bright wrappers is considered 'cool' and the more bright wrappers, chocolate and crisps [potato chips] they have, the cooler they are. Conversely, the more pots of obscure food they have in their lunch box, the less cool and the more peer dissaproval.

    A typical kids lunch box round here is:
    Sandwiches[white bread is more cool] containing jam/marmite/cheese & mayo etc [tuna is less cool - the smell]
    Chocolate bar
    Crisps
    Apple/other fruit
    Yogurt
    Drink of squash.

    I have slightly changed their lunch boxes to:
    One sandwich [still white bread though] or sometimes a pitta bread slice
    Pot of grapes
    Tub of cocktail sausages
    Apple/other fruit
    Pot of raisens
    Yoghurt
    Drink of Squash
    +/- Sometimes crisps and choc bar, but not every day.

    Sometimes carrot sticks get in there, sometimes cucumber slices or cherry tomatoes. But Im not really willing to make them get the p*ss taken out of them at school due to their food of all things, as I dont want them to have a rough time.
    Also a big factor is the cost of it. I dont know about you, but when you cut out cheap filling wheaty foods, suddenly the shopping bill goes up due to all the pricey meat and fresh fruit & veggies, and Im certainly not loaded with cash.
    Add to this the fact they are growing and very active [ages 6 and 8].

    I suppose Id just like a whole bunch of ideas that I can try out!!

    (My 11 year old is a different matter entirely, being a fussy eater who will always choose chocolate over anything else, and who uses her allowance to buy who-knows-what in the school canteen - probably the most 'cool' food she can buy, and you can guess what that might be - cookies, chips, crisps, sweet drinks etc. Her lunch box has been coming home with most of the food still in it for years.)

  • #2
    My youngest was diagnosed a non-coeliac gluten-intolerant when she was 5, so we went through the whole lunch-box scenario, as well as all the teasing about "non-cool" foods - I know just where you're coming from on that one!

    Some of her favourite packed lunches were home-made vegetable crisps (I use a mandolin to slice carrots, sweet potatoes, beetroot, parsnips, etc, then dry them with kitchen paper, lay them in batches on trays and spritz with olive oil and bake - delicious and you can spice them up if you like!), Scotch eggs with bashed vegetable crisp crumbs instead of the breadcrumbs, baby stuffed peppers (which I used to do with tuna mayo because she didn't care about the smell), cold meatballs, fruit dipped in dark chocolate was always a favourite for pudding, and I'd often include a thermos of home-made soup for her in the winter. I'd also often give her a slice of frittata, or make baby quiches for her (gluten-free, of course).

    Comment


    • #3
      Hey Deegie,

      I would agree that this is the hardest meal to keep primal.

      I think your lunch boxes seem pretty good. What's in the sandwich? Chicken, ham, nut butter, cheese are all good sources of protein.

      You could consider adding nuts to the pot of grapes, but of course cost is a big factor here.
      Instead of a chocolate bar, you might find some type of nut or seed bar, it might even have chocolate as well.
      I doubt there's any reasonable alternative to crisps, I simply never pack them, regarding them as non food. My daughter's lunch is probably not cool, but it feeds her.

      Recently saw a documentary showing typical school lunches in 2 schools. If the kids from school A could see what the kids from school B had (or in most cases, didn't have) they would soon stop complaining about whether theirs was cool or not.
      Annie Ups the Ante
      http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread117711.html

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by oliviascotland View Post
        My youngest was diagnosed a non-coeliac gluten-intolerant when she was 5, so we went through the whole lunch-box scenario, as well as all the teasing about "non-cool" foods - I know just where you're coming from on that one!

        Some of her favourite packed lunches were home-made vegetable crisps (I use a mandolin to slice carrots, sweet potatoes, beetroot, parsnips, etc, then dry them with kitchen paper, lay them in batches on trays and spritz with olive oil and bake - delicious and you can spice them up if you like!), Scotch eggs with bashed vegetable crisp crumbs instead of the breadcrumbs, baby stuffed peppers (which I used to do with tuna mayo because she didn't care about the smell), cold meatballs, fruit dipped in dark chocolate was always a favourite for pudding, and I'd often include a thermos of home-made soup for her in the winter. I'd also often give her a slice of frittata, or make baby quiches for her (gluten-free, of course).
        Olivia, these lunches sound incredible! And I stand corrected about their being no reasonable alternative to crisps!!
        Annie Ups the Ante
        http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread117711.html

        Comment


        • #5
          @oliviascotland - Oo, the crisps sound interesting!! And they love scotch eggs so I may tray that variation thanks!

          @Annieh - I guess I just wanted a wider variety - they soon get sick of the same stuff everyday [unless its junk] they are not allowed to take nut products into school even in their own lunchboxes, due to those kids that have nut allergies, otherwise I would definately put them in.

          Comment


          • #6
            I know that I'm radical and subversive, but here goes.

            First, I would make sure that breakfast and dinner were stellar and able to meet the dietary needs of the children. That is, this will be the "healthy" meals of the day. Then, I wouldn't worry about as much in between.

            But, still packing a lunch, I would go paleo-treat. Make the veggie crisps -- see how that goes. Perhaps include some home-made dips for them as well, if that suits your crew. Mine could care less, he'll eat crisps straight.

            And then, cakes. I know it seems insane. But, a friend of mine makes gluten-free, beet-root and chocolate cakes with a dark-chocolate glaze that is *divine*, and her carrot cake with coconut-honey drizzle is amazing. These cakes are chock-full of delicious, sweet veggies, and when they are not made predominately with nut flours (though I think she uses a fair amount of coconut flour), then they are really quite healthy too.

            Consider putting in 3 or 4 different "cupcakes" made with veggies instead of regular sugar ones, or even ones made with fruit. Banana "breads" might work nicely too.

            Then, the kids open up to a big feast of sweets!

            I might also include home-made sodas (you can go onto youtube and learn how to make traditional, lacto-fermented soda. . . i love strawberry, blueberry, and orange myself!), which woudl be a fun project for the kids to get into and learn to make (DS loves to ferment!), and also have a sweet reward. And, it's low, low sugar because the lactobacillus eats the sugar. YOu only get the fruit goodness and the gut-benefits of the bacteria! WOOT!

            Anyway, it's unconventional, but just go with it. make a bunch of cupcake versions of these beautiful things, put some nice icings together, make a BIG bag of crisps, send along some home-made sodas. . .yeah, I think I have a plan for DS's lunchbox next year. LOL (though, this boy has a preference for his meat ball dippers and raw cut veggies and straight up fruit. And a carrot. he has to ALWAYS have a carrot in his box).

            Comment


            • #7
              Could you get a recipe, perhaps? I have a lot of beets in the yeard, and wouldn't mind baking one for my folks. I found a couple on the net, but I of course want the original!

              This one uses bean flour (I want rice flour)
              Gluten-Free Chocolate Beet Cake | Delectably Free

              This one has whey protein (?)
              Gluten Free Beetroot Chocolate Cake | Gluten Free Cooking

              This one seems to be the winner so far, apart from me being puzzled over 'garsseed oil' - I figure coconut oil is OKay? and I don't have agave nectar, honey or maple syrop?

              Purple Velvet Torte - Healthy Chocolate Beet Flourless Cake | Elana's Pantry
              Last edited by Leida; 09-21-2012, 06:04 AM.
              My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
              When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

              Comment


              • #8
                Great suggestions! I better get some new baking tins

                Comment


                • #9
                  it doesn't look like the flour-less one, but that's the one that *i* would make, and yes, I would go ahead and sub coconut oil, though warm it to liquid before mixing, probably. Looks delicious. I love beets.

                  here's a paleo flour-less carrot cake, too, with a frosting recipe as well. it uses ground pecans, though. I would probably also add some raisins and maybe some ginger to it, but it looks delicious.

                  One of my favorite cookies is pumpkin-chocolate chip. we have to roast the pumpkins down here to get a puree (they don't sell it canned!), and I also add shredded coconut to mine for more texture. I would use coconut oil instead of other oil in this recipe, but it's the right idea. And uses rice flour.

                  Here are some delicious raw, vegan macaroons that I enjoy making -- and there are lots of variations on this recipe, so you can make these using all kinds of different flavorings, but. . . yeah, delicious. I like to use honey and sometimes make a honey-ginger one (i use ginger juice. . . just a little, so it doesn't kill me, but some people like to use candied ginger).

                  Anyway, ideas.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Well, I don't think that you should overs-stress about your child food in such detail. Most of the kids don't understand this stuff and it would be weird for them to be "different" than the other kids.

                    I suggest you to let them have whatever they want and keep them happy.
                    Want to handstand like Bruce Lee ?

                    Check lostartofhandbalancing.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      i don't think that kids should have whatever they want to keep them happy, because first, "happy" is a relative term, and second, it's simply not appropriate at certain ages. my 4 yr old is pretty good about a lot of things, but there are areas where I do not let him make decisions -- it would just be silly.

                      Food is one of those things. This is how families end up with a kid living off of ice cream, chicken nuggets, and gummy bears! And, I know those families and they are chaos.

                      That's not to say that you have to pendulum swing the opposite direction and be an absolute control-freak, either, but honestly, there are so many easy ways to get through this.

                      In my school, around age 11, trading was everything. my mother usually packed "double lunches" so that I could trade everything. I typically liked my lunches, anyway, so I would often just give the doubles away and people often loved the home-made cookies, cakes, and such.

                      That's why I suggested that she make home-made crisps/chips (if you have a microwave, there's a way to make them so that they are more like store-bought chips in crunch and flavor) and then a lot of cakes with veggie bases.

                      These -- if they are adjusted to the kid's tastes (ie, more chocolate in the beets!) -- will take center stage and the kid will be lucky because they get home-made cakes all the time. Here, home-made bread is *prized* over store-bought, and we can buy some *awesome* store bought breads here (we don't eat bread, I'm just pointing it out).

                      That might be cultural though.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        also, I would probably use inexpensive maple syrup or honey in the purple velvet torte recipe. i'm so going to make that. Adding melted chocolate instead of cocoa powder/nibs/whatever will probably make it less purple and more chocolate-colored, but might be yummy!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I am soooo going to try the purple velvet torte as cupcakes and might try a cream cheese sort of frosting as well. My 12yr old LOVES red velvet cake so she'd be ecstatic.

                          For us its less about the cool factor - I couldn't care less and my daughter doesn't really buy into that either - but I do believe that a bit of thought to presentation makes a difference to how easily accepted something will be. Which leads on to most important thing for me, is that it will be eaten and secondly, that it is quick to throw together in the morning. So she takes banana bread that has been baked in mini bundt pans - almost donut like in appearance, cool factor shoots way up yet they are actually really healthy and filling. Not something I would eat myself every day but her energy needs are higher than mine so she can handle the extra carbs from the nut flour (I know you can't have nut products in the lunchboxes but maybe find something similar using coconut flour). She'll also take a muffin shaped frittata (also doubles as a quick portable breakfast on those mornings, some carrot sticks (she doesn't like dips/sauces but you could add a dip for those quite easily) and a piece of fruit, water to drink and that is plenty as she has alot of school activities she'd rather be doing in her lunch time so she likes things that are quick to eat. Some days she'll replace the egg with cooked chicken strips (chicken drumsticks would be ideal and cheap but my fusspot does not like meat on the bone) or she'll take leftover salad etc for a bit of variety but she is pretty happy to take much the same week in week out. I freeze the banana bread and frittatas individually so she just grabs what she wants in the morning and by lunchtime everything is defrosted.

                          We've also had quite a bit of success finding healthier replacements for things she used to have. E.g. her favourite food ever is nutella on white bread - so now I make nutella at home (all the ingredients are primal, but still not an everyday food) and she has that as a dip with fruit when she is craving something sweet. Iced herbal tea has replaced soda - I just steep a few herbal tea bags (she particularly likes the wild berry type ones) in a litre of water and add a bit of honey to sweeten it a bit. Smoothies are another great afterschool snack if she's really hungry, we also freeze any leftover smoothie in popsicle molds.

                          All in all I've really had no complaints from her with the change in diet - she does miss bread & pizza alot! but she's knows she can still have that stuff occasionally when she is at sleepovers etc so she doesn't feel at all deprived or different from anyone else. So I'm not completely militant about what she eats away from home, I just hope that over time she will learn that this way of eating makes her feel better and will choose it for herself.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by NZBee View Post
                            So she takes banana bread that has been baked in mini bundt pans - almost donut like in appearance, cool factor shoots way up yet they are actually really healthy and filling.

                            .
                            Yum Bee, this sounds good. Do you have a recipe?
                            As for the frittatas, does she really like them after they have been frozen and defrosted?? How do you make them?
                            Annie Ups the Ante
                            http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread117711.html

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Annieh View Post
                              Recently saw a documentary showing typical school lunches in 2 schools. If the kids from school A could see what the kids from school B had (or in most cases, didn't have) they would soon stop complaining about whether theirs was cool or not.
                              Lunchbox differences in decile 1 and decile 10 schools - Campbell Live - Video - 3 News
                              Annie Ups the Ante
                              http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread117711.html

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X