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The Paloe/Primal Adaptations of Russian Food

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  • #16
    Hi Msojka, I have never made Bigos, though read about it a LOT in Ioanna Chmelevskaya books. But! I have a Russian recipe for Solyanka, a cabbage and sausage stew that is Primal with no modifications required.

    I have a great recipe for Golubtzy/Golabki/Cabbage Rolls. Actually, I have three - Lazy Moscovite, Traditional Rolls and as appetizer version of mini-rolls.

    I will make a huge post on Goluntzy after Syrniks, since a lot of folks like them
    My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
    When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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    • #17
      Hi Leida! I've really been enjoying your thread so far Really looking forward to your take on Golabki and, hopefully Solyanka!

      I thought I would share my great grandmother's recipe for Bigos, which I just made a big batch of, despite it being really warm outside here! I make it every year with my dad for Christmas.

      Cook up half a pound of bacon, chopped. Remove the bacon, then sweat 2 chopped onions in the rendered grease.
      Drain 3 jars of good, fermented sauerkraut and rinse with one jar full of water.
      Throw kraut, bacon and onions, 1 lb smoked kielbasa (sliced), 2 packages dried and reconstituted polish mushrooms (we soak ours in wine), 4 bay leaves, and a 2 lb pork roast into a giant pot. Cover all with good, tasty beef broth (Babcia called for water and 8 cubes of bullion). Bring to a simmer and cook for 2 hours, covered and stirring occasionally.
      Remove the roast and shred it; return it to the pot.
      Stir in 2 small cans of tomato paste and season with salt and pepper, then fit bigos into a sizable baking dish. Bake for half an hour at 350 degrees.
      Stir in about a cup of red wine.
      Put the bigos back into the pot (or a smaller one, having eaten a bit), and chuck it into the snow (or the fridge) to wait for tomorrow. Reheat on the stove each day, tasting copiously each time.

      I think this recipe is pretty simple to many I have seen. I think caraway seeds would be a great addition, especially without rye bread on the side! Smacznego!

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      • #18
        Thank you, Lindsay. Solyanka will be a bit different, but different is good. I will have to try this stew one of these days. I second caraway seed as great spice to try with it

        Now, to...

        Syrniks

        Syrniks are Faleo food, as it uses a fair bit of non-glutenous flours (rice, potato and tapioca). You will be saving them for a carb-heavy day. Syrniks can be served with anything you’d serve pancakes with, like sour cream, Kisel (I loved that combo as a kid!), hot fruit sauce, or berries and whipped cream or honey. They are best served hot out of the oven, but could be reheated on a steam bath next day: Simply throw them into a dish with a tight lid, cover them with a paper towel soaked in water and microwave of heat in the oven. For the stovetop, pour some boiling water in the frying pan with a tight lid, throw syrniks over it, and let the syrniks re-absorb the moisture and the heat).

        This recipe makes enough to feed 4 to 6 people depending on their appetites and what you serve as the sides.

        Quark (tvorog) – 2 cups
        1 large egg
        Flour Mix (recipe below) – up to 2 cups
        Butter – 2-3 tbsp
        Vanilla Extract – 1 tbsp (optional)

        The Syrnik’s recipe may take a bit more or a bit less flour mix, depending on how moist your quark is. Mine is pretty moist, so it takes both cups of flour, plus I use rice flour for dusting my hands, and to keep the dough to the right consistency.
        Preheat oven to 365 degrees F (if you are using oven-finishing method). For stove-top method, don’t preheat the stove (unless it’s cold in the kitchen or something).

        Step 1: Prepare the flour mix (2 cups)
        1 and 1/2 cup Rice flour, ¼ + 2 tbsp cup potato starch, 2 tbsp tapioca starch
        1 tbsp sugar (optional) – I am reluctant to let go of it, since it helps give syrniks golden color. You could omit it though, if you are into pale syrniks. I don’t think it will be wise to sub it for honey or whatever other sweetener, since it will add to liquids, and you would be adding more flour to compensate.
        ½ tsp baking soda
        ½ tsp salt
        Mix the flours together in a medium bowl and set aside.
        Step 2:
        Throw your egg in a bowl that can hold about 4-5 cups of anything. Notice how I am not saying the BIG bowl. Beat the egg with the whisk, enough to make the yolk come together with the white, but you don’t need to achieve any sort of frothiness or foaminess. Add vanilla extract, if using (I do, it smells divine). Add 2 cups of quark and mix it all with the whisk till combined.
        Step 3:
        Start incorporating the evilness of the flour mix into the quark and egg goodness. You are aiming to mix just enough flour in to create a lovely soft light dough that just stopped sticking to everything. Once this mission is accomplished, proceed to Step 3.
        Step 4:
        Now it’s time to get a really big frying pan out and start melting a nice amount of butter in it over the medium heat.
        Meanwhile, take plate, and a 2 tbsp scoop (scoop is optional, ¼ cup scoop is too much). If using, dust the scoop with flour, if not, you only get to dust your hands and the plate.
        Step 5: Scoop out the golf-ball sized pieces of dough. Eye-ball it or use the precise measure – at any rate for the prettiest presentation and cooking time you want them as even as you can manage. Flatten each ball into a patty, but don’t go overboard with flattening. This is syrnik, not a pancake.
        Step 6: I am almost positive that your frying pan is not large enough to fit all the syrniks in so place the first batch of syrniks about half an inch apart into the bubbling butter. These babies raise nicely, so to avoid problems with flipping them over, do leave that space in between! Fry syrniks on one sides, just enough to give them a golden shine, and for the patties to become definitely solid, and dry up top. Flip over and let the other side feel the heat.
        Now, here you make the choice. You can either collect your batches of syrniks into a REALLY BIG lasagna dish (I have that scary size Jumbo one), cover with foil and let them finish off in the oven for 30 min @ 365 degrees. The goal is to bake the middle, so test one.
        Alternatively, reduce your heat, and cover your frying pan with a matching lid to achieve the same effect, letting them steam and be happy. You will have to either use two pans or enjoy the first batch while the second one is cooking.
        My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
        When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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        • #19
          The Many Ways to Roll The Cabbage

          The first thing about making the cabbage rolls is to muster the cabbage. Cabbage selection is an art. I prefer tight, light and flatter cabbages to the round, green and loose ones. So did my grandma. Must be hereditary.

          For two of the 3 variations on Golubtzy (or Cabbage Rolls) you will need to learn to undress the cabbage. Do not expect to be able to go from the outer shell to the very core. Getting 15 leaves is great, a dozen is about average from a garden variety cabbage. I remove the outer cabbage leaves, steam them for a few minutes till they soften, immerse in the ice-cold water in the sink, drain in a colander, let drip dry on a paper towel, then cut off the back of the thick portion of the leaf. For mini-rolls the leaves can be broken, so you could keep stripping more than the premium outer leaves.

          Now, if you do not want to deal with the cabbage stripping, the first recipe is for you. Well, that is if you are comfortable with chopping the cabbage.

          The First Way: Lazy Golubtzy.

          My mom was working full-time, so she was not into stripping cabbage leaves and rolling cabbage rolls. But she loved Golubtzy. So, she made what most of us lazy Russians make instead – Lazy Golubtzy. (It's like the Japanese making scattered sushi, while the rest of the world rolls 'em up.) My mom loved it (Lazy Golubtzy, not sushi), I loved it, grandma lived with it, and my littl’ parrot went crazy over it nose diving into our plates and plucking pieces out from between our fingers that desperately covered the plates (true story). You do need a really big electric pan (wow, that comes as a surprise I wager!)

          1 lb of cabbage, shredded
          4-6 large carrots, chopped
          1 large onion, chopped
          A mix of ground meats, beef, pork, lamb, turkey or anything else to come up to 1 to 1&1/2 lbs (you can use all the same meat, but it’s boring!)
          6 hard-boiled eggs*
          4-5 cloves of garlic (or to taste if you aren’t into garlic)
          1 tbsp of butter or other fat of choice
          1-2 cups of broth (I prefer beef broth, but tastes differ)

          Optional: cream or sour cream (Full Fat, please), bacon, whole dry chilies, parsley root

          Spices: caraway seed (1/2 tsp), celery seed (1/2 tsp), black pepper (1 tsp), coriander seed (1 tsp), fennel seed (1 tsp), paprika (1/2 tbsp), salt to taste, 4 to 5 bay leaves, toasted
          Herbs: lots of parsley (Italian Flat leaf. The curly one is good for flower arrangements)

          *Hard boiled eggs is the OMG, PRIMALIZATION! If you are acceptant of rice, add a cup of dry rice and 4 cups of broth when you are adding meat and broth in. My mom was so lazy that she wasn’t even browning the meat (Oh, how I suffered....), just dumping everything raw in the pan and letting it do its thing, with the meat converting into broth and cooked meat simultaneously. I believe that it would work better with rice than with the primal version.

          Step 1: Mix your meats together. Brown in batches till they are brown and quite crisp. Drain, and rinse under hot water if desired.

          Step 2: Grind all spices together except the bay leaves.

          Step 3: Either use the drippings from the meat or melt the fat of choice or turn the fatty bacon into bacon grease. Toss in chopped onions and carrots (and parsley root if using; most people do not have it on hand, so yeah, it is very optional). Let it sweat till translucent. Add crashed or sliced garlic and the ground spices, mix and add the cabbage and the ground beef. Once the mix becomes to dry out, add a cup of broth, the bay leaves (and whole dry chilies of using) and cover with a lid. Let simmer until the cabbage is tender, adding more broth if necessary to keep it moist, but not drowning in liquid.

          Step 4: Mush the boiled eggs with a potato musher. Mix them into the lazy Golubtzy. Let simmer while you are chopping a mountain of fresh parsley. Mix in sour cream or cream, enough to keep everything in an awesome state of sleazy togetherness. Adjust seasoning (well, okay, add salt & freshly ground pepper if it doesn’t feel just right!), mix in the chopped parsley and put the pan on a wooden board in the middle of the table for everyone to dig in. Don’t forget the additional dish of the sour cream for extra authenticity.

          You may or may not remove the bay leaves before plunking the pan on the table. The custom in Russia was to treat those and whole peppercorns as ‘surprises’ and the one who found it in his bowl was called ‘a commanding officer’ for the duration of the supper. Mercifully, when the lazy cabbage is served for supper, that duration is rather short.
          Last edited by Leida; 09-14-2012, 07:08 AM.
          My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
          When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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          • #20
            what a great thread. My Paternal grandfather was from Ukraine, my grandmother from Austria. She cooked all sorts of family foods and taught my Mother. My absolute favorite she called perogi but I have not seen it made the way she did. It actually, looks like a blintz.

            You make a flour batter which is fried into 6" crepes, the cooked crepes are then filled with a mixture of "friendship farms' farmers cheese" the only farmers cheese that works as the other type is a hard cheese. Any way farmers cheese, an egg or two, parsley, salt. Mix that up, put some on a crepe, roll, fry in butter and serve with sour cream. Oh my yum! My absolute favorite food in the entire world. Unfortunately, I am lactose intolerant and don't eat grain, but for this I would eat the grain. In fact I have farmers cheese in my fridge and freezer right now as I buy it when I see it for sale as it is usually not carried locally. I hope it won't make me sick as it is cultured. However, I am afraid to try it. The last time I had dairy by mistake I couldn't move for 24 hours.

            Did I mention this is my favorite food?

            Has anyone heard of this way of making perogi or is this a dish with another name? with the mention of quark earlier it made me think that perhaps quark would have been the original cheese for this but if quark was not available to my mother perhaps the farmers cheese was a substitute. If I could find some sheep's milk perhaps I could make sheep's milk quark? If you are familiar with quark do you think it would work in this type of recipe.

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            • #21
              What you are talking about back home was called "Blinchiki". The fillings was either the quark filling or ground beef filling. Accordingly, they were called either 'Blinchiki s Myasom' or "Blinchiki s Tvorogom" (Blinchiki with Meat or with Quark). There were even layered pies made sort of like casserole bakes here or macaroni pies.

              Those were very often made after Mardi-Gras from the all leftover crepes! Just when you thought you can't face another one....

              It can be replicated relatively painlessly & successfully, though not in the quantities my grandma would make, lol, once you muster the art of making grain-free crepes from cream cheese and eggs.

              Now, Pirogi/Pirozhki in Russian tradition is an elongated bun of yest dough with a LOT of various fillings.
              My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
              When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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              • #22
                Fabulous Leida, thank you for identifying it. yes I am familiar with the other Pirogis. Not sure why my family called the Blinchikis perogis. Weird but so is my family. Glad to have finally identified them.


                "once you muster the art of making grain-free crepes from cream cheese and eggs. "

                Now is that even possible? Not that I can eat cream cheese but very curious.

                Thanks for all your information. Love the blinchikis! Now to figure out if I am pronouncing that correctly.

                Comment


                • #23
                  I am loving this thread -thank for sharing your recipes ... Warms my northern New England heart with all of the hearty food. I'll be trying these recipes now the fall is upon us.

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                  • #24
                    The Way the Cabbage Rolls (Cont'd)

                    The first thing about making the cabbage rolls is to muster the cabbage. Cabbage selection is an art. I prefer tight, light and flatter cabbages to the round, green and loose ones. So did my grandma. Must be hereditary.

                    For two of the 3 variations on Golubtzy (or Cabbage Rolls) you will need to learn to undress the cabbage. Do not expect to be able to go from the outer shell to the very core. Getting 15 leaves is great, a dozen is about average from a garden variety cabbage. I remove the outer cabbage leaves, steam them for a few minutes till they soften, immerse in the ice-cold water in the sink, drain in a colander, let drip dry on a paper towel, then cut off the back of the thick portion of the leaf. For mini-rolls the leaves can be broken, so you could keep stripping more than the premium outer leaves.


                    The Second Way: Classic Golubtzy (Cabbage Rolls)

                    At least a dozen of cabbage leaves prepared as described above
                    2-4 large carrots, grated
                    1 large onion, minced
                    A mix of ground meats, beef, pork, lamb, turkey or anything else to come up to 1 to 1&1/2 lbs (you can use all the same meat, but it’s boring!)
                    6 hard-boiled eggs*
                    4-5 cloves of garlic (or to taste if you aren’t into garlic)
                    1 tbsp of butter or other fat of choice
                    ½ to 1 cups of broth + ~ 1 tbsp of tapioca (I prefer beef broth, but tastes differ)
                    ¼ to ½ cup of cream or same amount of coconut milk

                    Spices: nutmeg (a pinch), caraway seed (1/2 tsp), celery seed (1/2 tsp), black pepper (1 tsp), coriander seed (1 tsp), fennel seed (1 tsp), paprika (1/2 tbsp), salt to taste, 4 to 5 bay leaves, toasted
                    Herbs: lots of parsley (Italian Flat leaf. The curly one is good for flower arrangements)

                    1 c of sour cream or 1 c of sour-cream + 8 oz can of tomato paste or 16 oz of tomato paste; paprika (1 tbsp) and cayenne pepper (1/4 to ½ teaspoon) or ~ ¼ cup butter.

                    Toothpicks or cooking string

                    Optional: a handful of raisins!

                    *Hard boiled eggs is the OMG, PRIMALIZATION! If you are acceptant of rice, add a cup of boiled rice will serve.

                    When you are making classic Golubtzy you first to have Zen style acceptance of the fact that you will never have the perfect quantities of filling vs leaves. Have hollowed out peppers or zucchinis on hand to stuff the rest of the filling in. Golubtzy won’t mind sharing the pan with stuffed peppers or zucchinis. Honest.

                    Step 1: Mix your meats together. Brown in batches till they are brown and quite crisp. Drain, and rinse under hot water if desired.

                    Step 2: Grind all spices together except the bay leaves.

                    Step 3: Either use the drippings from the meat or melt the fat of choice or turn the fatty bacon into bacon grease. Toss in minced onions (and parsley root if using; most people do not have it on hand, so yeah, it is very optional). Let it sweat till translucent. Add crashed or sliced garlic and the ground spices. Once the mix becomes to dry out, reduce to really-really low setting, and mix back in beef, parsley and grated carrots. If needed, drip in some broth.

                    Step 4: Mush the boiled eggs with a potato musher. Mix them into the filling. Mix in enough cream to keep everything moist, but not drippy. If you are not willing to use cream, mix in a tbsp of tapioca in about ½ cup of hot broth, pour in and let cook till it thickens and moistens the filling. Again, the goal is moist but not drippy. Adjust seasoning (well, okay, add salt & freshly ground pepper if it doesn’t feel just right!), and turn the pan off. Let cool to comfortable handling temperature.

                    Step 5: If you are going to bake your Golubtzy, pre-heat oven to 400 degrees F. Mix the paprika (1 tbsp) and cayenne pepper (1/4 to ½ teaspoon) into 2 cups of sour cream; or 2 cups of tomato paste or mix paste, sour-cream and spices in a small bowl. It will top Golubtzy. If you want to fry your Golubtzy, just have the butter handy.

                    Step 6: Fill and roll individual rolls, secure each with a toothpick or a string around it. Pack into a baking dish tightly if you are going to bake your Golubtzy. Put them onto a transitional holding plate until you finish them all.

                    Step 7: If baking, dump the sauce on top of the Golubtzy, and slip into the oven for an hour or until hot and bubbly. Once the sauce is hot and happy, put a wooden board on the table, and place the baking dish on it. Let everyone fish out just enough Golubetz’s and sauce to suit personal preference.

                    If you are frying your Golubtzy, heat the butter in a large pan, and gently place each Golubetz into the frying pan, then flip it over even more gently once the base has browned up. To compensate for the heart-breaking lack of sour-cream in a fried version, serve with a bowl of sour-cream, and top the Golubtzy with chopped chives and parsley… be creative. Be bold.
                    My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
                    When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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                    • #25
                      I cannot wait to try this version!! Thank you Leida!

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        For two of the 3 variations on Golubtzy (or Cabbage Rolls) you will need to learn to undress the cabbage. Do not expect to be able to go from the outer shell to the very core. Getting 15 leaves is great, a dozen is about average from a garden variety cabbage. I remove the outer cabbage leaves, steam them for a few minutes till they soften, immerse in the ice-cold water in the sink, drain in a colander, let drip dry on a paper towel, then cut off the back of the thick portion of the leaf. For mini-rolls the leaves can be broken, so you could keep stripping more than the premium outer leaves.

                        Now, if you do not want to deal with the cabbage stripping, the first recipe is for you. Well, that is if you are comfortable with chopping the cabbage.

                        The Third Way: Crazy Easy Cabbage Rolls.

                        Now, this one is an East meets East sort of a recipe.

                        A bunch of half to quarter cabbage leaves prepared as above and cut into somewhat triangular shapes (or polygonal)
                        8 or so baby carrots, grated (about ½ cup)
                        1 lbs ground turkey
                        1 clove of garlic (or to taste if you aren’t into garlic)
                        1/4 tbsp of butter or other fat of choice
                        Nutmeg, 5-spcie, cinnamon, freshly ground black pepper, Sichuan pepper: about ½ tbsp in all
                        Sesame oil 1 tbsp
                        Chopped cilantro 1 tbsp

                        Optional: cream or sour cream (Full Fat, please), soy sauce (for dipping)

                        Step 1: Brown your turkey with butter and spices until brown and quite crisp.

                        Step 2: Add sesame oil and grated carrots and cilantro if using. Turn off the pan.

                        Step 3: Roll about 1 tbsp of filling into each piece of cabbage leaf. Secure with a toothpick if it is totally falling apart.

                        Step 4: Serve with you fav acceptable oriental dipping sauce or soy sauce or wow, coconut aminos if you have them. Otherwise, keep it a-la Russe and serve with sour cream.
                        My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
                        When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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                        • #27
                          I have to share this here: I got water kefir grains, and if it is made with half molasses, half coconut sugar it tastes exactly like bread kvass! I added a bit of soda water to mine to make it fizzy, but I hear that you can double ferment for it as well.

                          So, guess what? A Primal adaptation of Kvass and of Okroshka!!!

                          Normally, people in the West don't really think of Russians as someone combating heat. But the summers in Russia are actually quite hot, so we are big on cold soups. Okroshka is one of them.

                          To make Okroshka for 4 people, you need to fine chop:

                          4 medium sized cold potatoes
                          4 hardboiled cold eggs
                          8 oz (250 g) or more of cold boiled beef or sausage of kolbasa type that you find acceptable
                          about half of a long English cucumber (fine dice)
                          8-10 red radishes sliced thinly
                          1 bunch of chives or spring onions, chopped
                          fresh dill to taste

                          Chop and mix everything but dill. Put about 1 to 2 cups of the dry mix in your bowl. Top with chilled water kefir (the colder the better!) Add a tbsp of sour cream if desired and top with chopped dill. Add salt to taste, swirl the spoon, and enjoy your cold soup like you're in Moscow!
                          My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
                          When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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