Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

My Homemade Yogurt Sucks.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • My Homemade Yogurt Sucks.

    So I've recently gotten into making my own homemade yogurt. I signed up for a raw milk share so I'm getting a gallon per week, and we just don't consume that much in milk alone. Yogurt seemed like a good way to use up the excess. However my yogurt is not coming out good. It's chunky, almost like cottage cheese. And there is none of the sour/tart taste I associate with good yogurt. Hmph. Here's what I'm doing ... hoping someone can help pinpoint what I'm doing wrong!

    1. Heat raw milk up to 115 F. (Enzymes, etc. die at 118 so I don't want to kill the good stuff.)
    2. Add 1/32 tsp yogurt cultures. Whisk like crazy to evenly distribute it.
    3. Put bowl into yogurt maker.
    4. Take back out 7-12 hours later. (I've tried this whole range because someone told me that it would get more sour if I left it longer. Didn't work.)
    5. Drain for 5 min - 2 hours. I've tried everywhere in this range, thinking that maybe I was draining it too long and that was leaving it chunky. But the chunks seem to be there even before draining, just hiding out at the bottom.

    So my yogurt basically tastes like chunky milk. The texture is seriously off-putting. I'm trying to eat it but it turns my stomach. (Doesn't actually make me sick at all though - - so I don't think it's actually "bad".) HELP.

  • #2
    I have never made yogurt, so I may be totally wrong, but it seems like you would need more starter culture. You didn't say how much milk you're using (or I didn't catch it), but 1/32 tsp seems like an impossibly small amount. How do you even measure that?

    My only other guess is that since you're not heating the milk very much, the naturally present bacteria dominate and you're getting cottage cheese instead of yogurt. I would be loathe to "cook" raw milk too. Seems like a waste since most of the supposed health benefits come from the fact that it is raw.

    Comment


    • #3
      The directions for the starter say 1/8 tsp for a whole gallon, so I'm putting 1/32 tsp into a quart. I forgot to say how much milk I was using, oops. And yes it can be a pain to measure, but I found some 1/8, 1/16 and 1/32 tsp measuring spoons which fixed that problem. I suppose it could be that they are inaccurate. I'm not sure if "chunky and not sour" is a symptom of too much or too little starter though!

      Comment


      • #4
        This recipe worked for meA Year of Slow Cooking: You Can Make Yogurt in Your CrockPot!.

        I generally make kefir with my raw milk now.

        Comment


        • #5
          get some heavy cream and a yogurt maker. Then follow instructions on a packet of culture. It's a lot less complicated that way.
          --Trish (Bork)
          TROPICAL TRADITIONS REFERRAL # 7625207
          http://pregnantdiabetic.blogspot.com
          FOOD PORN BLOG! http://theprimaljunkfoodie.blogspot.com

          Comment


          • #6
            are you moving it at all while it is 'brewing'? I've found disturbing it while it's working is fatal to texture. I use considerably more starter than you and add some cream. Texture can still be a bit hit and miss, but I only get 'clots' if I disturb it.
            I like badgers, books and booze, more or less in that order.

            Comment


            • #7
              I've been making my own yoghurt for over a year now, and have it turn out perfect 99% of the time.

              Bring milk to 90C in a double boiler (so as not to scald the milk) to denature some of the proteins which apparently influences the texture of the final product.

              Next, cool the milk in a cold water bath to 40-50C. Mix some of the warm milk with a few tablespoons of yoghurt leftover from the last batch to thin it out to an even consistency, and pour it into the warm milk; mix well and pour the mixture into containers.

              Place the containers in a warm water bath (about 35-45C) and maintain the temperature for 8-20 hours depending on how sour you like the final product to be. Do not move or jostle the fermenting milk. Do make sure to keep the temperature within the above limits for the full time period.

              Finished.

              I make about 3-4ℓ at a time from whole milk (3.6%+ mf) every week using this method; firm, sour and creamy every time.
              Primal food in Japan

              Comment


              • #8
                The chunks mean it's culturing at too high a temperature. It's not tart b/c you aren't letting it incubate long enough. It can go 24 hours. Your milk likely has more cream than any store yogurt which contributes to the sweetness.

                All that said, I gave up expecting raw milk yogurt to be like store-bought. If you want thick, smooth yogurt consistently, I would recommend heating your milk to 180 and cooling. The fermentation and probiotics will somewhat make up for killing the original beasties. You could also decide that you're just going to deal with a different consistency, whirl it in the blender to smooth it and and enjoy. :-)

                Comment


                • #9
                  I cheat and use UHT milk and milk powder. I also use half skim milk and half full cream milk.

                  If you want it more sour you can leave it for about 24 hours. I left mine for about 30 hours the other day accidentally and it turned out fine.

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    Originally posted by Faumdano View Post
                    I've been making my own yoghurt for over a year now, and have it turn out perfect 99% of the time.

                    Bring milk to 90C in a double boiler (so as not to scald the milk) to denature some of the proteins which apparently influences the texture of the final product.

                    Next, cool the milk in a cold water bath to 40-50C. Mix some of the warm milk with a few tablespoons of yoghurt leftover from the last batch to thin it out to an even consistency, and pour it into the warm milk; mix well and pour the mixture into containers.

                    Place the containers in a warm water bath (about 35-45C) and maintain the temperature for 8-20 hours depending on how sour you like the final product to be. Do not move or jostle the fermenting milk. Do make sure to keep the temperature within the above limits for the full time period.

                    Finished.

                    I make about 3-4ℓ at a time from whole milk (3.6%+ mf) every week using this method; firm, sour and creamy every time.
                    Thank you so much for the recipe. I've been loath to heat it up to that temp because the live enzymes in raw milk die at 48 C. I'm going to try following your recipe EXACTLY though, and see if I can fix my texture/taste problems! My whole milk is from jersey cows so the milk fat ratio is much higher than 3.6%. I've read that 5% is normal but I'm pretty sure mine is even more than that ... a solid 25% of the jar is cream!

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      Originally posted by jkr View Post
                      The chunks mean it's culturing at too high a temperature. It's not tart b/c you aren't letting it incubate long enough. It can go 24 hours. Your milk likely has more cream than any store yogurt which contributes to the sweetness.

                      All that said, I gave up expecting raw milk yogurt to be like store-bought. If you want thick, smooth yogurt consistently, I would recommend heating your milk to 180 and cooling. The fermentation and probiotics will somewhat make up for killing the original beasties. You could also decide that you're just going to deal with a different consistency, whirl it in the blender to smooth it and and enjoy. :-)
                      Ah ha ... so the chunks could be because of my yogurt maker's temp (which is not adjustable - - boo). Now that I think about it, the chunks do seem to be mostly all at the bottom of the container, which is the part in contact with the yogurt maker's base (where the heat is). And the yogurt DID seem to be pretty hot. I think I'm going to put a towel in between the base of the maker and the bowl containing the yogurt, and also leave a thermometer in there. I hadn't done that before because the yogurt maker claimed to keep yogurt at 110 F exactly, and I just believed it (seems dumb in retrospect).

                      I'm fine with my homemade yogurt not being exactly like store bought. I just can't get over the chunky texture! LUMPY would be ok, but this is like ... hard/crumbly in spots. Actual CHUNKS. Ew!

                      And yes you are right, my milk does have a lot of fat ... it's jersey milk and about 25% of the jar is cream. I have no idea of the exact nutritional info, as I buy from a farm and it's kind of "under the table" since raw milk is illegal to sell for human consumption here in Georgia.

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        Originally posted by KimInGA View Post
                        And yes you are right, my milk does have a lot of fat ... it's jersey milk and about 25% of the jar is cream. I have no idea of the exact nutritional info, as I buy from a farm and it's kind of "under the table" since raw milk is illegal to sell for human consumption here in Georgia.
                        Sounds delicious. Where are you getting it from if you don't mind sharing? I just recently got my first half gallon of raw milk from Cedar Rock farms at the International City farmer's market in Warner Robins.

                        Comment


                        • #14
                          I make raw with a 1/2 gallon Jersey of milk and superfat it by replacing a pint of the milk with a pint of raw cream jersey, so the fat content of your milk really shouldn't be an issue at all. You CAN make very fatty yoghurt... actually you can possibly make an ALL Cream type yoghurt thing from what I understand.

                          You can get around the texture problem a bit by heating HALF of the milk to 180 to denature it(in a double boiler so it doesn't scald), and not heating the other half... only bring the other half to the 100-110 temp range once the heated half is cooled down. Never add the unheated milk to the hot milk to cool it... or you'll kill it too.

                          I don't fully heat my milk (I never heat past about 110)... try another batch with better temperature control IMO before killing your milk to make it... or try the heat half method.
                          I strain my yoghurt for greek style and it never disappoints.

                          It is normal for yoghurt to form curd during the culturing process... most store bought yoghurt has been whipped and had additives put in to stabilize it. At home the texture will be slightly different... whisking vigorously will make it smooth and creamy. I prefer to NOT do this initially, but as the servings are portioned out. IMO it stores better if allowed to remain in curd rather than disrupted.

                          I do a water bath culture in a cooler... A low and slow method that takes a bit of fiddling... but it works like a champ once you get the feel of it. NO hot spots... retains heat well... can keep it going at 100-110 for a very long time. If it goes low you just heat some water, drain some water off, pour the new hot water in... put the lid back on... let it rest again.
                          I like to let mine go a bit long so it gets a lot of that lactic tang. A short culture will result in a sweeter, less tart, yoghurt.

                          Lots of people also use the oven method where the oven light, or gas pilot light, keeps the oven temp consistently about 110...
                          You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.
                          ~Friedrich Nietzsche
                          And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.

                          Comment


                          • #15
                            Originally posted by Forgotmylastusername View Post
                            I cheat and use UHT milk and milk powder. I also use half skim milk and half full cream milk.

                            If you want it more sour you can leave it for about 24 hours. I left mine for about 30 hours the other day accidentally and it turned out fine.
                            When I was making yogurt a couple of years ago, I used powdered milk along with store-bought organic whole milk. The powdered milk did make a difference.

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X