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  • Duck Eggs

    I got some duck eggs from a co-worker. I've never eaten duck eggs before, is there anything special I should know about them (more firm? more runny? more yolky? etc?), or do I treat them just like chicken eggs?

  • #2
    Taste tends to be a bit stronger and they ar usally about 30-50% larger than Large eggs, but use is pretty much same as chicken eggs
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    • #3
      They have a higher fat content than chicken eggs. I can't recall the exact amount, but we bought some from a lady at the farmer's market and she gave us a nice fact sheet. Scrambled duck eggs are almost too rich for me, but they are indeed very tasty.

      The fact sheet also said "and please don't cook the eggs margarine and chemicals, my girls worked hard to make em!" You already knew that one, but I thought it was cute ; )

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      • #4
        Yes more yolky/more fatty yolky. Also a bit stronger tasting... but if you are used to pastured chicken eggs it shouldn't be too much. I'd worry about someone going from store bought cheapo chix eggs to natural duck eggs though... It would be a bit of a shock. LOL

        Also, the white can be a bit tougher than chicken eggs if you straight up fry them and over cook it.

        That said, I adore duck eggs.
        “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
        ~Friedrich Nietzsche
        And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.

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        • #5
          They also have a higher water content and will overcook more easily than chicken eggs. I eat them from time to time and they're nearly indistinguishable from chicken eggs except in size. Oh and the proportion of white to yolk is different than chicken eggs; there is more yolk in proportion to whites in duck eggs. I like them a lot.
          5' 9" 47 YO F
          PB start June 2, 2012
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          • #6
            They make ace omelettes....

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            • #7
              I stopped by my odd, little farmer's market to pick up pastured eggs and heavy cream and they had duck eggs! After looking through old threads, I am really jazzed to play around with these.

              The shells look really dirty, sort of a brownish mottled look. Should I wash them? Maybe the chicken eggs I've been buying are also dirty, but I never noticed because the shells are brown or colored?
              50yo, 5'3"
              SW-195
              CW-125, part calorie counting, part transition to primal
              GW- Goals are no longer weight-related

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              • #8
                The whites do get tougher if you aren't careful. But they are wonderful in a fluffy omelet or anything where you beat the whites. Wonderful for mayonnaise because of the higher ratio of yolk to white.
                __________________________
                age 56, type 2 diabetes, swimmer
                low carb since 2006 thanks to Jenny, primal since Jan. 2012

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                • #9
                  I've only had them once, and truth be told I didn't like them. They are much stronger than a chicken egg, so much so that I was actually taken aback by it and sort of turned off. However, I can expect someone to develop a taste for it quickly. Possibly even myself judging how Primal has made me detest any red meat cooked more than medium rare, and gamier meats in general.

                  Example: my aunt says she loves lamb, but she hates Australian and New Zealand lamb because it's "too strong." My default answer is always, "Well, then you don't like lamb because that's what lamb tastes like, not the weak US lamb that tastes like beef because it's been force-fed corn and ruined the flavor." So, I can definitely see someone that likes stronger, gamier meat quickly acquiring a taste for, or outright loving, duck eggs for the strong flavor.
                  Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
                    I've only had them once, and truth be told I didn't like them. They are much stronger than a chicken egg, so much so that I was actually taken aback by it and sort of turned off.
                    That's interesting. I was expecting a stronger taste, but the taste of these was almost indistinguishable from chicken eggs. I didn't care for the texture of them scrambled though. They were much firmer. I usually beat a little HWC into scrambled eggs, but these might have benefitted from plain milk. I think 1/2 or 1/3 duck eggs in a frittata might nice. They made fabulous custard - dense, firm and silky.

                    They are supposed to be great for baking...doubt I'll experiment much with that, lol.
                    50yo, 5'3"
                    SW-195
                    CW-125, part calorie counting, part transition to primal
                    GW- Goals are no longer weight-related

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                    • #11
                      FYI--all eggs come dirty originally; some farmers don't wash them in order to leave the natural coating on the egg, because it keeps the egg from spoiling. A washed egg, like the kind you get from the store, is dipped in a sealing solution during processing. I usually rinse or wash straight-from-the-bird eggs, to avoid getting dirt or bacteria in my omelette.

                      I love duck eggs, especially soft boiled! I found them a bit tricky to crack, but then read that you can whack 'em around the circumference with the back of a knife before puncturing that thick membrane.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by LauraSB View Post
                        That's interesting. I was expecting a stronger taste, but the taste of these was almost indistinguishable from chicken eggs. I didn't care for the texture of them scrambled though. They were much firmer. I usually beat a little HWC into scrambled eggs, but these might have benefitted from plain milk. I think 1/2 or 1/3 duck eggs in a frittata might nice. They made fabulous custard - dense, firm and silky.

                        They are supposed to be great for baking...doubt I'll experiment much with that, lol.
                        I made mine over easy, which compounds the flavor. I imagine if you cooked it more, it would be less noticeable. Mine were from some ducks near my parent's house so they're as pastured as you can get. Maybe it's not fair to compare them to a CAFO chicken egg.

                        I can imagine them making some incredible custard or ice cream.
                        Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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                        • #13
                          Mmm, deviled eggs using duck eggs is some kind of special. I think I'll add that to my Super Bowl snack list. Yum.

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                          • #14
                            Some of my gals (the ducks) lay eggs with a colored coating on them. That is just fine, and doesn't hurt the eggs. Some of my gals will lay where ever they are, and being flat footed, they tend to have more muck in their pen than hens because they don't scratch and turn the hay over. Which means, they may be a little dirty. If so, washing will not hurt them.

                            My oldest son did an experiment with duck meringues and hen meringues. Kids were 50/50 on telling them apart. Adults pretty much 100% could tell. Those raised on store eggs hated the gamey flavor, while those raised on free range eggs loved them.

                            Whites take longer to beat. They will form in a ball when you poach them (unlike hen eggs that flatten.) They make excellent salted eggs. I love an almost hard boiled duck egg. They are great for quiches - which we eat a lot of when the girls get going in the spring - lovely with fresh greens!

                            I could eat deviled duck eggs all day if they didn't make me feel sick to my stomach. One a day is about all I can handle.

                            If you find goose eggs, they taste less gamey and are WONDERFUL for baking about anything that you want. 1 goose egg equals about 4 hen eggs. Also make great eggs for decorating for Easter if you blow them. (Stick a wire in it and twirl around to make blowing easier.) Duck eggs also are good for blown eggs as they tend to have a harder shell than hen.

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                            • #15
                              I think your son's little experiment is pretty spot on... and this is why I love duck eggs so much.

                              I grew up on pastured hen, duck and other eggs... including goose, quail, and even guinea.

                              As a matter of fact the first time I ever ate a CAFO cheap white store bought egg I was about 20 years old. As soon as I cracked it into the skilled I thought it looked wrong. It was pale, the yolk didn't stand tall, the white was so runny... it gave me pause, but they were supposedly fresh it didn't smell. I cooked it. I seasoned it. I put it on my plate.
                              And I took one bite and literally spat it right back out onto my plate, very indecorously.
                              AHHhhhhhhhhhhhgggggggggggg! What on earth... it's insipid, and flavorless, and runny...
                              It must be bad.
                              Toss it.

                              I float tested the rest of the eggs and they were fine.
                              And asked the guy I was living with... who laughed at me and told that's what "normal" eggs look like.
                              “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
                              ~Friedrich Nietzsche
                              And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.

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