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Will a crockpot make any beef tender?

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  • #16
    i love that dutch oven

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Dr. Bork Bork View Post
      We give our stew meat a good sear in a pan on the stove, then cook it in the crock pot for at least 6 hours.
      +10!

      I've NEVER had any piece of meat not *fall apart* once Crocked! Plus, with a crock, it is REALLY HARD to overcook anything. As long as there is liquid in the pot, it tenderizes (OK 48 hours I've never had happen however, a 6 hour roast ended up going for 12 and turned out terrific!)

      As all of us have different *STAGES* in our daily lives, here is MY suggestion:

      If you have time the night before or the morning of before work: Build and use a crockpot.

      If you get home and forgot to defrost or build your dinner: Pressure Cooker

      If you get home and have TONS of time to cook: Fuck you I hate you! (smiles)
      Last edited by DeilaMiah; 06-18-2012, 03:22 PM.
      If you do not stand behind your military, feel free to stand in front of them!

      EMAIL ME!

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      • #18
        Originally posted by loneviking View Post
        Second on the pressure cooker. That's the fastest and surest way to tender beef. Usually, but not always, the crockpot works too after several hours.
        Oh sweetie. The crockpot works ALWAYS. I remember the FIRST crockpot meal my grandma made in 1977, a chicken. Although bought to keep her OUT of the kitchen, she spent all day at home, checking *the pot* every 15-30 minutes. What should have been 6 hours became 10 because of the *peeks*.

        I have used, or been in the household of, a crockpot for well over 30 years. There's been NO CUT of meat that didn't get tender while being crocked.

        Seriously. The only way to Frig it up is to forget you have a crockpot going for a couple days.

        Perhaps loneviking should attempt a few more recipes.
        If you do not stand behind your military, feel free to stand in front of them!

        EMAIL ME!

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        • #19
          I cooked a small grass fed chuck in my crock yesterday for 9 hours and it was a little tougher than usual. I browned it first of course. I did it on low and it should have been melt in the mouth. Can't figure out if it needed less or more time. I'm usually thrilled with the crocked meat, though...
          SW: 243
          CW: 177
          Goal: Health

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          • #20
            Originally posted by KerryK View Post
            I cooked a small grass fed chuck in my crock yesterday for 9 hours and it was a little tougher than usual. I browned it first of course. I did it on low and it should have been melt in the mouth. Can't figure out if it needed less or more time. I'm usually thrilled with the crocked meat, though...
            This could be a variety of things:

            Was it frozen when put in the crock?
            Bigger than usual?
            Good amount of liquid?
            Fat content?

            9 hours and tough sounds under crocked to me. I've always seen tough UNDER crocked but not OVER crocked.
            If you do not stand behind your military, feel free to stand in front of them!

            EMAIL ME!

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            • #21
              my b/f insisted on buying a crokpot and has attempted a few times to cook tongue in it. the results have been disappointing but he can't cook to save his life. ok, sausage in the toaster oven.

              i braise. it's nearly impossible to overcook tough/fatty cuts this way. brown the meat. remove. brown some root veggies, like carrots and onions. add red or white wine or beer. some oj maybe. add back meat. garlic, ginger. dried thyme and peppercorns. get to a boil. simmer on low heat, like all day, or in the oven at 250 for as long as it takes. cook it the day before you want to eat it.
              As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

              Ernest Hemingway

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              • #22
                Originally posted by KerryK View Post
                Can't figure out if it needed less or more time.
                I'm going to go with 'more'.
                Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

                Griff's cholesterol primer
                5,000 Cal Fat <> 5,000 Cal Carbs
                Winterbike: What I eat every day is what other people eat to treat themselves.
                TQP: I find for me that nutrition is much more important than what I do in the gym.
                bloodorchid is always right

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by magicmerl View Post
                  I'm going to go with 'more'.
                  +1. people are so conditioned to lean, quick-cooking meats. do not fear the heat!
                  As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

                  Ernest Hemingway

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                  • #24
                    Yes to long cooking, not peeking, adding an acid such as lemon or wine (tomato paste is great, too). I'm just finishing an awesome crocked pork shoulder + hocks that I did very, very little to and I can't believe it's this good. about 4 lb meat, a big onion, diced, a spice rub of salt, pepper, cayenne, and a couple other things, 6 hours in the crock and then top with balsamic vinegar or lemon and copious fatty liquid.
                    If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

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                    • #25
                      I buy a 3lb chuck roast and before bed I plop it into the crock pot with water to cover and salt. In the morning it's done. About 12 hours on low. I get gelatinous broth and enough chuck roast for various meals for an entire week.
                      Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by DeilaMiah View Post
                        This could be a variety of things:

                        Was it frozen when put in the crock?
                        Bigger than usual?
                        Good amount of liquid?
                        Fat content?

                        9 hours and tough sounds under crocked to me. I've always seen tough UNDER crocked but not OVER crocked.
                        It wasn't too bad, but definitely not melt-in-the mouth and my 93 yr old Dad was a bit disappointed. Some of it was tougher than other parts. To answer your questions, it was completely defrosted, less than 2 lbs, I loosely followed this recipe Kalyn's Kitchen: How to Make Pot Roast in a Crockpot and Recipe for Balsamic and Onion Pot Roast (but added a full 1 cup of bone broth and 1/2 cup water), and I think it was pretty fatty. I'll try longer next time and more liquid.

                        Originally posted by magicmerl View Post
                        I'm going to go with 'more'.
                        Yeah, I'm thinking so...

                        Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
                        I buy a 3lb chuck roast and before bed I plop it into the crock pot with water to cover and salt. In the morning it's done. About 12 hours on low. I get gelatinous broth and enough chuck roast for various meals for an entire week.
                        OK, you COVER it with liquid and cooked it longer. I know what I'm changing next time... Thanks all!
                        SW: 243
                        CW: 177
                        Goal: Health

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                        • #27
                          Actually you don't usually need to cover it, in fact the meat will give up quite a bit of liquid on its own. Sounds like you just got an extra-tough piece of grassfed beef, which has happened to me, too.
                          If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

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                          • #28
                            I just got a "pike's peak roast", have no idea what that means, but it's going in the pot with wine, some garlic and onion maybe a ton of mushrooms. Dunno, will find out.

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                            • #29
                              poaching beef in milk is delightful

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                              • #30
                                Just don't cook it too long. I made a stew with grass fed stew beef and cooked it for longer than 8 hours - and the meat came out dry. There wasn't a lot of fat with it. I'd say not longer than 4 to 6 hours.

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