Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Meatballs questions

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Meatballs questions

    Hi all,

    I'm quite new to this meat cooking business but am wanting to branch out and try some meatballs. I've found a few primal-friendly recipes but I'm not really good at following recipes! So, do I need to use eggs? Will they stick together without? And does this depend on the type of mince used? I have some lamb mince (not lean) in the freezer I'd like to try. I thought I would like to just try using some mashed pumpkin, lamb mince and herbs and see if that works. But I didn't know if egg added to this would be too moist, or if it would actually help it stick together. Some recipes also add oil. Again, is this necessary? Also, I've seen recipes that involve cooking the balls in the oven then pouring the sauce over the top, and others where you cook the balls in the sauce with a lid on, I guess they sort of steam this way. Do they tend to fall apart if you cook them in the sauce?

    Any meatball experts out there?

    Thanks!
    Primal since May 2012. Loving life and down 50lbs.

  • #2
    I have rarely cooked meatballs. I'd say to experiment. If they fall apart, they still taste good.
    Ancestral Health Info - My blog about Primal and the general ancestral health movement. Site just remodeled using HTML5/CSS3 instead of Wordpress.

    My MDA Friday success story - Stubborn Senior's Testimonial

    Comment


    • #3
      Haha yes of course they would! Good thinking!
      Primal since May 2012. Loving life and down 50lbs.

      Comment


      • #4
        I view meatballs as mini meatloaf, and use eggs, around one per half kilo of meat. I do masses of them at once, bake them in the oven, and freeze them. I like to make a base out of ground beef or pork or lamb, use egg to keep it together, salt and pepper. From there I'll split it into smaller batches and add different things. Parmesan cheese, feta cheese, garlic, onion, mushrooms, Montreal steak spice, all different kinds that I fancy making. Bake, cool, taste test, freeze in labelled baggies.

        Mmmmmmmm. Now I want meatballs!
        Fighting fibromyalgia and chronic myofascial pain since 2002.

        Big Fat Fiasco

        Our bodies crave real food. We remain hungry as long as we refuse to eat real food, no matter how much junk we stuff into our stomachs. ~J. Stanton

        Comment


        • #5
          I make meatballs like this:

          Cold meat
          Add garlic, chilli, herbs and spices
          Add some finely chopped onion if you like - I tend not to

          Mix together by squeezing the meat through your fists. The result should be a sausage meat like texture.
          Form meatballs, brown off in a skillet and set in the over for a further 15-20 minutes, depending upon size.

          Eat and enjoy.

          I've never found the need to use binding agents - add an egg if you like the flavour; it won't harm the mix, nor is it necessary.

          I make meatballs a lot - beef, lamb, pork, even turkey. With turkey, you can flatten small meatballs, roll in coconut flour and make a good version of nuggets.

          Have fun!
          Paul
          http://www.pjgh.co.uk
          http://www.livingintheiceage.co.uk

          "... needs more fish!"

          Comment


          • #6
            I use eggs occasionally in my meatballs. It adds a nice flavor, but it's not required.

            Sometimes I'll put some vegetables in a blender, then add them to the meat. I don't like the taste of most vegetables, so this is a good way to get them into my diet.
            "Don't waste your time, or time will waste you."

            Comment


            • #7
              Seconded to all the advice. OP, adding pumpkin to meatballs is well, kinda weird. It might taste great, and maybe you're onto something, but if you are a beginner cook who doesn't know how to cook a basic meatball, I'd stick to the advice above for now and eat the meatballs over the pumpkin.
              If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks everybody. I might try holding off on the egg because I'm only going to try with a small batch and a whole egg might be a bit too much moisture. I'm also going to hold off on the pumpkin for now (I just thought I'd do that because I saw a recipe with grated carrot). So just lamb mince, garlic and thyme, rolled into little balls, then browned in a pan in some coconut oil then baked. Sounds amazing and so simple! If they turn out well, which I think they will, I might make a big batch to freeze.

                It feels pretty strange to be learning how to cook meat dishes. I did 1.5 years of a chef apprenticeship but stuck to learning mostly vegetarian cooking and forgot pretty much everything I learned about cooking animal products, through not using the skills and information. I even had to ask someone how to boil an egg recently! But the things I've made have turned out well, like I made a primal cottage pie, which I dreamed up and it was great!
                Primal since May 2012. Loving life and down 50lbs.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I made them and they turned out great, except that there was so much fat and moisture pouring out of them onto the baking tray. I think with a less fatty meat than lamb they would be even better.
                  Primal since May 2012. Loving life and down 50lbs.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Heth View Post
                    I made them and they turned out great, except that there was so much fat and moisture pouring out of them onto the baking tray. I think with a less fatty meat than lamb they would be even better.
                    I have always had this if I bake the meatballs - and it makes them a bit dry too. I much prefer to fry them in lard, on quite a high heat, until brown / cooked through, and then transfer to a low oven to keep warm while I fry more. This way, they stay wonderfully moist and succulent.

                    Love garlic and thyme with lamb, by the way. Also, ground cumin and little cayenne makes them sort of Middle Eastern - leaving out the thyme and adding green coriander (cilantro) is also good.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      breadsauce, I think you're onto something - I imagine the layer of oil from frying would seal in the moisture. I was too lazy to fry them though - I was making the sauce and the meatballls concurrently, so I went for the easy route. They aren't too dry in the tomato sauce I made. They made an awesome breakfast with some steamed kale.
                      Primal since May 2012. Loving life and down 50lbs.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Good ideas in here especially dividing into batches. I have been adding fetta and mint to lamb meatballs.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          How long do they keep in the freezer. This thread has me wanting some!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Fatty meat works great and it holds on on itself -you may add other stuff for flavout if you want, but it is really not needed.

                            Favorites at home are:

                            1/2 kg ground meat + two spoonfuls of tomato paste (Muti)+ oregano
                            1/2 kg ground pork and beef mix + 1/4 teaspoon of cocoa powder + Utah sweet salt with salsa mole
                            1/2 kg ground pork + curry powder + one tablespoon coconut milk panfried in coconut oil and served with curried coconut milk.

                            Those are summer recipes, it got so hot in here this days. I try to mess as little as possible with my meat when I find really good stuff. Pumpkins are watery and unless you have some baked leftovers they will always water the mixture (you could add starch but I wouldn't).
                            I mix rice with the meat if the boys are in need of some carb refill, but that rarely happens.
                            Cooking the in a sauce is possible but I prefer to panfry them or roast them and then allow them to simmer in a sauce (or dip them and eat them).

                            Keep things easy and you'll find cooking meat is easy as pie.

                            PS have you tried chicken meatballs or fish ones? They rock.
                            No limits, only my will and the worlds I build.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by pjgh View Post


                              With turkey, you can flatten small meatballs, roll in coconut flour and make a good version of nuggets.

                              Have fun!

                              Made mini turkey/sage/oregano patties on the weekend. First batch just fried in bacon fat, second batch coated in coconut flour and then fried in bacon fat. The second stayed more juicy. Will definitely be coating in the future.

                              Mommymd

                              Mommymd
                              --mommymd

                              LCHF since Oct 2011

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X