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  • Organ meat?

    My local woolworths is now stocking a variety of organ meats, tongue, liver, heart and kidney from cows, lambs, and chicken. I'd love to have a go of it, but my housemates want nothing to do with it.

    What's the best to start with, as an introduction? What does it taste like, compared to muscle meat? And what's the best way to cook these to make them look visually appetising to some very fussy friends?
    Starting weight: 90kg (11/3/13) (33.1 BMI)
    Current weight: 89.5kg (12/3/13) (32.9 BMI)
    Goal weight: 75kg (27.5 BMI)
    Short term goal: BMI under 30
    Mid term goal:
    40 pushups, 100 situps, 10 pullups, 10.1 beep test, >10m 2.4km run
    Long term goal: Enlist as an ARA Combat Engineer

  • #2
    I eat a fair amount of organ meats, I grew up in Eastern Europe and it's a fairly common food there.

    I think the most "socially acceptable" organ meat is liver, with hearts (specifically chicken hearts) coming in second. I usually just stir-fry my liver in some butter with sliced onions. For chicken hearts, I sear them in butter, they have a delicious chewy texture and a very mild flavor.

    I also make an adventurous Russian soup based on pickles/pickle juice and chicken hearts/livers (you can also add beef kidneys), but I think it's a bit over the top for most North American palates.

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    • #3
      I didn't see chicken hearts, just beef and lamb. I'm pretty adventurous myself, try anything once etc.
      Starting weight: 90kg (11/3/13) (33.1 BMI)
      Current weight: 89.5kg (12/3/13) (32.9 BMI)
      Goal weight: 75kg (27.5 BMI)
      Short term goal: BMI under 30
      Mid term goal:
      40 pushups, 100 situps, 10 pullups, 10.1 beep test, >10m 2.4km run
      Long term goal: Enlist as an ARA Combat Engineer

      Comment


      • #4
        I find heart very rich and tasty, especially slow cooked. A good friend views beef heart as dog food. We are both horrified at the others opinion!! I personally like using different organ meats in stews, along with more regular cuts. It's not overwhelming, and a variety of meats makes for a more interesting stew ie. heart, kidney and shank meat.

        Edit to add, tongue is its own adventure. I love the stuff but it can be a bit rough on people to prep, cook and peel. I toss the veiny bits and the tough outer skin to the dogs, they love it and no waste.
        Last edited by ElaineC; 05-29-2012, 10:33 PM.
        Fighting fibromyalgia and chronic myofascial pain since 2002.

        Big Fat Fiasco

        Our bodies crave real food. We remain hungry as long as we refuse to eat real food, no matter how much junk we stuff into our stomachs. ~J. Stanton

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Leonharte View Post
          My local woolworths is now stocking a variety of organ meats, tongue, liver, heart and kidney from cows, lambs, and chicken. I'd love to have a go of it, but my housemates want nothing to do with it.

          What's the best to start with, as an introduction? What does it taste like, compared to muscle meat? And what's the best way to cook these to make them look visually appetising to some very fussy friends?
          The texture of tongue and heart will probably be closest to muscle. Brain has the consistency of eggs. Spleen is like a more mushy liver. Kidney is a lot like tendon, a bit chewy. If you're not sure slow roast is a good start.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by js290 View Post
            The texture of tongue and heart will probably be closest to muscle.
            That's because tongue and heart ARE a muscle :-P

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Primalwombat View Post
              That's because tongue and heart ARE a muscle :-P
              LOL... indeed... busted.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by EyeOfRound View Post
                I eat a fair amount of organ meats, I grew up in Eastern Europe and it's a fairly common food there.

                I think the most "socially acceptable" organ meat is liver, with hearts (specifically chicken hearts) coming in second. I usually just stir-fry my liver in some butter with sliced onions. For chicken hearts, I sear them in butter, they have a delicious chewy texture and a very mild flavor.

                I also make an adventurous Russian soup based on pickles/pickle juice and chicken hearts/livers (you can also add beef kidneys), but I think it's a bit over the top for most North American palates.
                +1. I grew up in a latinamerican culture and organ meats are as socially acceptable as burgers and fries are here. I've said before that my dad and his buddies taught me "primal" as a kid, long before it was acceptable in the States.
                "After all we did for Britain, selling all that corduroy and making it swing, and all we got was a bit of tin on a piece of leather, an MBE." --George Harrison

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Bioletti View Post
                  ... as socially acceptable as burgers ... are here.
                  And there's one answer O.P.

                  Grind 'em up and mix them into minced beef when you make hamburgers.

                  Sally Fallon suggests 2 pounds of ground beef and half a pound of ground heart in her standard recipe for hamburgers.

                  I've heard of other people putting liver in -- probably not too much as it tastes quite strong.

                  chicken liver is good for pate. Lamb's liver is great simply sliced and fried.

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                  • #10
                    Lamb's liver is super mild compared to beef, bison, and even chicken. If you find you don't like the taste of liver, but want to include it for nutritional reasons, I recommend our wooly friend, the sheep.
                    The Champagne of Beards

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                    • #11
                      I just fried up beef liver last night. Dipped it in coconut flour and fried it and then turned the temp to low and finished it on a bed of onions for 20 mins. Man is it delicious. I have a beef heart that I am going to slow cook next man. Nothing tastier but the fat gets everywhere when you eat leftovers.
                      Check out my primal blog: http://primalroar.posterous.com/

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by MightyAl View Post
                        I just fried up beef liver last night. Dipped it in coconut flour and fried it and then turned the temp to low and finished it on a bed of onions for 20 mins. Man is it delicious. I have a beef heart that I am going to slow cook next man. Nothing tastier but the fat gets everywhere when you eat leftovers.
                        To contribute:

                        One of my favourite treats is veal liver.

                        I chop an onion and caramelize it in butter, having seasoned it with salt and pepper. I use a very generous amount of butter. When heavily caramelized, I drain the butter (but reserve it), put the caramelized onions back in the pan and add some red wine or sherry vinegar. This helps to cut the richness. I plate the caramelized onion and quickly take a whole veal liver, lightly seasoned with salt and pepper, and sear it on both sides. I plate this on the bed of caramelized onions.

                        The richness of the veal liver - the soft texture, and its flavour - contrast well with the caramelized onions that have had their richness cut a bit with the red wine or sherry vinegar.

                        I love organ meat. Grilled rabbit liver is one of my favourites, too, but it is harder to come by in my area.

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                        • #13
                          Lamb hearts are lovely roasted: just bung em in the oven! If you want you can stuff them with a nut and herb stuffing. If you think your flatmates will balk at the tubes coming out of the top, you can cut those out before you put the hearts in the oven. Serve with roast vegetables. Beef hearts are tougher and best sliced and casseroled.

                          Lamb liver is delicious sliced and quick-fried (takes about thirty seconds) and served with a rich sauce (cream and brandy, or a thick gravy). Goes well with bacon and onions. Ditto for chicken liver. Liver is also a prime ingredient in pate.

                          Calf tongue is best boiled in salty water for a few hours, skinned and pressed, then eaten as cold meat. It's usually easier to get hold of pre-cooked than raw.

                          Kidney: steak and kidney! Chop the kidneys, removing the white core, and casserole with stewing steak and red wine to make a rich meaty sauce to serve with e.g. cauliflower mash. Once they're on board with that, you can start leaving out the steak.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by RichMahogany View Post
                            Lamb's liver is super mild compared to beef, bison, and even chicken. If you find you don't like the taste of liver, but want to include it for nutritional reasons, I recommend our wooly friend, the sheep.
                            Thanks for sharing will try this tonight.

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