Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Confused!

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Confused!

    I have read so much about Paleo and read this forum daily. I don't understand the inconsistencies that keep showing up. For instance, according to the PaleoDietFoodList, plain full fat yogurt, cassava, cashews and sweet potatoes are not allowed. Then why do they show up in the Paleo recipes? I'm not trying to lose weight - just want to eat healthier. What gives?

  • #2
    those things are allowed on primal.

    Comment


    • #3
      Paleo and primal are two different things.

      Comment


      • #4
        oh yes that too.
        paleo is much stricter, ie no dairy, and says to have leaner meat generally. Primal allows dairy, and fattier cuts of meats are suggested (if grassfed/hormone free).

        Comment


        • #5
          Paleo is strict no sugar, no dairy, lean cuts only. Primal is its more relaxed little brother in that it allows dairy and fatty cuts of meat.

          Think of Paleo as Percy Weasely from Harry Potter & Primal like Fred & George.
          --Trish (Bork)
          TROPICAL TRADITIONS REFERRAL # 7625207
          http://pregnantdiabetic.blogspot.com
          FOOD PORN BLOG! http://theprimaljunkfoodie.blogspot.com

          Comment


          • #6
            OP, I think the the two terms just get intermingled, even though they are different in what is and is not accepted. People make exceptions on both plans. Paleo is much more stricter.

            This thought below has always buggd me. Can you help clarify?

            Correct me if I am wrong here with my thinking. With Primal, grass fed is the first choice. Mark says if one must buy grain fed meat buy leaner cuts. Grass fed meat is leaner ~ 25% and has a higher O6/O3 nutritional value. Grain fed is fattier and if you are going to buy this cut then buy leaner cuts. I know this is partly stated because the fat in meats is where the toxins are held, and that the O6/O3 ratio is lower. So, to me primal meats that are grassfed or pastured raised are leaner naturally. Sometimes, I think there is an excess in the amount of fats Primal eaters really need to eat. I get adding a slice a butter to grass fed, but not tons of fat when grain fed meat has a ring of 1/2"-1" of fat.

            Comment


            • #7
              No the point about that is that nasties are fat soluble, so if you buy just ordinary meat, then cut away the fat.

              Comment


              • #8
                There are a lot of kinds of paleo too, some of which are higher fat than others. Cordain-style paleo is lean meats, but Robb Wolf is macronutrient agnostic. Paleo pretty much always excludes dairy, and some people also exclude nightshades. I consider myself more paleo than primal mostly because I avoid dairy (except butter, which is generally accepted as okay).

                Also, in my experience, a lot of paleo folks are actually less fearful of natural sweeteners and fruit than I find many primal people are on MDA, but again, that's not consistent and you will meet VLC/ZC paleo types.

                Basically, there's a wide range in the ancestral diet world, and you'll encounter a lot of debate. The main theme is to eat real food, avoid things like grains and legumes (or in some cases only eat if traditionally prepared), and steer clear of stuff like refined sugar and industrial seed oils.
                “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

                Owly's Journal

                Comment


                • #9
                  From what I understand, the Paleo diet is not just one specific diet; there are dozens, if not hundreds of versions of it that can range from strictly raw meat and animal fat to soaking beans and grains for 30+ days. Primal Blueprint just happens to one version of a Paleo diet. It's important to remember that there are no absolutes in the Paleo diet other than avoid highly processed nutritionally-void foodstuff, poorly farmed meats, and known toxins/allergies, and anyone who claims to know the absolute perfect diet, and know exactly what prehistoric man ate on a daily basis is full of it. All we know is that they didn't eat modern-day processed junk food, everything else varies by climate, terrain, and geographic location. There is no right or wrong, there's only right and wrong for you and your health.
                  | My (food) Blog | Follow me on Facebook | Pinterest | Twitter |

                  “It does not take a majority to prevail, but rather an irate, tireless minority, keen on setting brushfires of freedom in the minds of men.” - Samuel Adams

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by kmodell View Post
                    I have read so much about Paleo and read this forum daily. I don't understand the inconsistencies that keep showing up. For instance, according to the PaleoDietFoodList, plain full fat yogurt, cassava, cashews and sweet potatoes are not allowed. Then why do they show up in the Paleo recipes? I'm not trying to lose weight - just want to eat healthier. What gives?
                    Measure your own blood sugar response to the various foods and it'll be more clear for yourself.

                    Blood Sugar 101

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by js290 View Post
                      Measure your own blood sugar response to the various foods and it'll be more clear for yourself.

                      Blood Sugar 101
                      I appreciate this short explanation for the sites you link. Giving the links without direction, IMO, hinders/lacks guidance on what/why the link is presented and how one can learn from it.

                      Thanks again.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by marcadav View Post
                        I appreciate this short explanation for the sites you link. Giving the links without direction, IMO, hinders/lacks guidance on what/why the link is presented and how one can learn from it.

                        Thanks again.
                        Each person is capable of making the best choice they can with any given information. As such, I usually don't find it necessary to make any explanation.

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X