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can i buy bone broth instead of making it?

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  • can i buy bone broth instead of making it?

    It sounds tedious to make bone broth but seems to have so many benifits, i would like to try it. I have a trader joes about an hour away, does anyone know if they would sell a good one there. Or cant you buy such a thing?

  • #2
    Originally posted by LeaB View Post
    It sounds tedious to make bone broth but seems to have so many benifits, i would like to try it. I have a trader joes about an hour away, does anyone know if they would sell a good one there. Or cant you buy such a thing?
    I don't think they sell it there.

    They'll sell a "beef stock" or a "chicken stock" probably, but it's not the same at all.

    It's so ridiculously easy to make though.

    Just invest $30-$50 in a decent quality slow cooker (one with a removable ceramic pot) and the $2-5 for the bones (I get 'em grass fed), cover the bones with water and let it cook for 24-72 hours. No more effort is necessary really.

    I just had a soup I made tonight with stock I defrosted, shiitakes roasted garlic broccoli rabe, and some herring fillets I added just for fun. Damn that was a tasty dinner.

    Try it out, it's very minimal hassle with a slow cooker.

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    • #3
      ^ for reals

      i've got a bunch of bones in a crock pot as we speak
      beautiful
      yeah you are

      Baby if you time travel back far enough you can avoid that work because the dust won't be there. You're too pretty to be working that hard.
      lol

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      • #4
        If finances are not a concern, I think USwellness meats sells premade frozen stock without any crap in it.

        Stock is actually not that annoying to make after the first few tries. Everything it annoying at first. Nothing tastes as great o me as homemade chicken stock. Totally worth the effort IMHO
        Using low lectin/nightshade free primal to control autoimmune arthritis. (And lost 50 lbs along the way )

        http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html

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        • #5
          Originally posted by jammies View Post
          If finances are not a concern, I think USwellness meats sells premade frozen stock without any crap in it.

          Stock is actually not that annoying to make after the first few tries. Everything it annoying at first. Nothing tastes as great o me as homemade chicken stock. Totally worth the effort IMHO
          I'm thinking of making my own pemmican after having tried some of USwellnessmeat's version. $33 for 2lbs, I'm thinking I can beat them on pricing... but the experimentation is where it's going to get goofy.

          Are my housemates ready for me to make jerky, then powder it, then mix it with melted tallow???

          Who gives a crap.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by LeaB View Post
            It sounds tedious to make bone broth
            It's really, REALLY not. Seriously, it's easier than making your daily breakfast. Throw some bones/carcasses in a slow cooker, chuck in a pinch of salt and splash of ACV, cover with water, turn on. Go away for at least 24 hours. Come back. Strain contents of cooker through a big sieve, put in fridge. DONE.

            I frigging HATE cooking, but I can knock out a batch of bone broth every week without even thinking. Nothing I have ever bought in a store matches the taste of homemade broth. Nothing.
            I have the simplest tastes. I am always satisfied with the best.

            Oscar Wilde

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            • #7
              Learning to make stock is easy and important. Once you've made it right and used it, you'll realize that there is no substitute. Suck it up-you'll thanks us later.
              Lifting Journal

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              • #8
                So do you just go to your local grocer and say gimme ur bones???? lol but really.. do you?
                Female 5'5", Feb. 29, 2012 SW 208, GW 160
                My journal...
                http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...tml#post734883

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by lamoka View Post
                  So do you just go to your local grocer and say gimme ur bones???? lol but really.. do you?
                  Also, which bones are best? Beef? Pork? Lamb?
                  I'm not a complete idiot! There's parts missing!!

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                  • #10
                    Hi,
                    lost my last reply so I will try again, hopefully not a double post.

                    thanks for the replies, the recipe I saw required cooking on stove top and periodically skimming the fat off the top. I do have a slow cooker with removable pot and can totally handle that!

                    Is skimming the fat necessary?

                    Also, where do you get the bones. The grocery store butcher would not have grass fed bones. The farmer I know, whom I am going to order a 1/4 beef from, sends his cow to a processor once a year, so he won't have any around. so WHERE do I find some bones!!! ??

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                    • #11
                      I do not skim the fat if I'm having broth as part of my morning routine. However, once I've put my pot full of broth in the fridge, I do skim off the fat and use the tallow for cooking. It's DELICIOUS!

                      I also highly recommend roasting your bones for about an hour at 350 degrees. Gives an even more intense flavour.

                      I literally just finished making 40 hour broth. In the crock pot. I add salt, pepper, a whole head of garlic, and some onion. Maybe fresh herbs like thyme or sage if I feel like it. Chuck it all in with cold water, and turn it on. Leave it.

                      It's magic!

                      Edited to add: I've seen beef bones at Whole Foods. You want bones that are wide and full of marrow. Not narrow rib bones!

                      You can also re-use bones! Keep cooking with the same batch until they dissolve/fall apart!
                      Last edited by patski; 04-06-2012, 07:21 AM.
                      A Post-Primal PrimalPat

                      Do not allow yourself to become wrapped up in a food 'lifestyle'. That is ego, and you are not that.

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                      • #12
                        I rarely buy bones for stock. I have 2 zip lock bags in my freezer. 1 for chicken/poultry/pork bones, and 1 for beef/lamb bones.
                        Every time we have a piece of meat with a bone in it, the bones go into the freezer after dinner.

                        It usually doesn't take long for the bags to fill up.

                        I keep them separate so that I can cook ruminant bones for days, while I've read that due to the omega 6 content of chicken/pork that they should be kept to 6-8 hours of cooking to avoid oxidation.

                        Some days it's a batch of beef stock, other days a poultry/pork mix.
                        We don't eat much chicken anymore, but I do love throwing a whole free-range chicken into the crock pot for 4-5 hours, and then after dinner, chucking the carcass back in an boiling it for stock.

                        This is all great nutrition that I would have been wasting if I threw the bones away. Occasionally, I will supplement them with a pack of Beef Soup Bones, but in general my stock is made out of what would have been garbage in the past.

                        I really like having the crock pot running with bones dissolving their mineral goodness into the water while simultaneously scenting the house with deliciousness.

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                        • #13
                          I never skim the fat. I love fat in my broth.

                          My favorite stock is chicken. I like it best if I roast the meat til brown, throw in the pot with onions, carrots, celery, tarragon. Cook for a few hours. Stain and use. Yummy!!
                          Using low lectin/nightshade free primal to control autoimmune arthritis. (And lost 50 lbs along the way )

                          http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html

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                          • #14
                            Definitely roast your beef bones before simmering in the crock pot. The flavor is SO much better.

                            I like adding a few bay leaves for the last couple of hours, it really makes a difference.
                            Also, salt to taste. Unsalted broth is not too yummy, in my world.

                            I like to throw a carrot , a couple celery sticks and half an onion in too for the last few hours. Gives an awesome flavor.

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                            • #15
                              I use either the crock pot or (more usual) a large stovetop pot. In fact, I'm thawing some lamb bones right now, since I have recently purchased half a pastured lamb.

                              You only have to skim once: when the froth first comes up, which on the stove is in a few minutes. That's skimming froth, not fat.

                              At the end, I simply remove bones, let broth cool down, put pot in fridge and let it gel the fat overnight. The next morning I remove the layer of fat (usually throwing it away). If you've done pastured/organic meat, you can reserve a little of the fat (fat is where pesticides really hang out).

                              Also: I make the broth with onion, salt and pepper to taste. Maybe some celery. Maybe a few mushrooms. Those flavors help encrich the meatiness of your good bone broth, but should still leave it generic enough for most purposes. Also keep in as much cartilage as you can. (Wing tips and feet are actually good in enriching chicken broth.)

                              Farmer's markets in your area may have other suppliers of meat for you to check out. Chickens -- I usually purchase the whole bird and cook the remains down. (Might as well get my money's worth out of pastured birds!) If you are getting 1/4 of a beef, are they de-boning it for you? Get bone-in and as you work on it, reserve the bones as possible.

                              PS the comments about roasting beef bones are right on. I'm going to try that with the lamb broth today (my first time making lamb broth).
                              Last edited by Artemis-MA; 04-07-2012, 05:25 AM.

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