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How To Pan Fry A Good Steak?

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  • How To Pan Fry A Good Steak?



    It always comes out tough and useless!

    "The penis is the male animal-flower, a soft-firm dildo, a warm dream."
    -Raymond Peat, PhD

  • #2
    1



    What do you fry it in?


    I use either coconut oil or butter; a decent amount of either (or a mixture of the two). I heat it until I can smell that it's hot (if that makes sense). I like my steak super rare so fry it only for a couple of minutes on both sides.


    I've also poached steak before...that made it super tender, and it was cooked the whole way through rather than bloody like it is when I fry it.

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    • #3
      1



      Depends how thick it is. If it's pretty thick I usually do medium heat for 5-6 minutes per side if it's pretty thick. Comes out nice and charred on the outside but still juicy and bloody in the middle. Great w/ avocado. Fried the last one in a little olive oil and came out perfect.

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      • #4
        1



        HOT pan, lots of butter. Few minutes each side, then remove and let rest a little before digging in.

        Eating lots but still hungry? Eat more fat. Mid-day sluggishness? Eat more fat. Feeling depressed or irritable? Eat more fat. People think you've developed an eating disorder? Eat more fat... in front of them.

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        • #5
          1



          Ha! I just posted my favorite for ribeye on the other post. But I like it seared on the outside, very pink in the middle. I find that medium heat cooks too through, and butter (even ghee) tends to really smoke at high temps.

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          • #6
            1



            I prefer cooking on the grill, with wood, charcoal, or even gas. But with that said, indoor grilling has to be done at times and I've never found a pan that I liked in regards to grilling. Often I'd sear the meat, get the outside nice and brown and finish it off in the oven. I've since bought a indoor grill, kind of like those George Forman ones but an offbrand, and I love it. I cook nearly all my meats on there, from salmon to burgers to frozen chicken to steaks. I have perfect control over the meat's doneness with the indoor grill, and I've never had it turn out a bad peice of meet.

            Ism's in my opinion are not good. A person should not believe in an -ism, he should believe in himself. I quote John Lennon, "I don't believe in Beatles, I just believe in me."--Ferris Bueller, 1986
            Check me out @ my blog: Retrospective Caveman
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            • #7
              1



              If you find that you can't get it how you like it you can always cook it on high heat a few minutes each side and finish it in the oven at 350 degrees for another 5 minutes.

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              • #8
                1



                Steak is easy for me. Hot pan. Sear one side, flip and sear the other. Done. Hell, it's usually still cold in the middle.


                Rare is the easiest way to cook steak. Just gotta get a little brown on the outside and you're done.

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                • #9
                  1



                  I pan fried a steak for the first time last night, and I think that what I did worked out ok.


                  I used this salting method[/url] (I don't know if it helped - again, this was a first for me!) first... I did that at room temperature so the steak was almost room temp when I cooked it.


                  I heated some olive oil on high-ish (my stove's medium-high seems comparable to "high" on most). After rinsing the steak and patting it very dry, I seasoned it with black pepper (it's now mildly salted all the way through, so no more salt) and cooked it about 3 minutes on each side... that seemed almost dark enough on the outside, but wasn't cooked through as much as I'd like, so I turned the heat to medium-ish and cooked it another few minutes on each side until it was a nice medium done-ness.


                  Mine was a pretty thick steak. It seemed to cook a teeny bit more after removing it from the heat, as it rested, so make sure you aren't overcooking because of that.


                  My husband, who isn't a big fan of steak, said it was still one of the best he's ever had. *blush* I agree that it came out really well. I'll do it again, for sure.

                  "mayness, you need to have a siggy line that says "Paleo Information Desk" or something!" -FMN <3

                  I'm blogging again, at least a little bit.

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                  • #10
                    1



                    NoSalad: watch the juice that leaks out of the steak. I usually turn it when the top side is getting nice and juicy, cook it for another few minutes, then take it off, still juicy. Doing that has consistently resulted in medium-ish doneness, but I cut my beef on the thinner side.

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                    • #11
                      1



                      I put mine under the brioler in the oven when it&#39;s too cold to go outside....

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                      • #12
                        1



                        Oven finishing is key. Also, if you want a great easy pan sauce, here&#39;s an idea:


                        Once you take it out of the oven, rest the steak for 4 minutes. Put the steak on a plate, and pour all the juices left over onto the pan (specifically, all the stuff stuck to the pan). Pour a tablespoon or two of balsamic vinegar on top of that and scrape with a wooden spoon to deglaze the pan. Pour that stuff over the steak. It kicks the crap out of A1.

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                        • #13
                          1



                          The problem is that YOU NEVER PAN FRY A STEAK! Oh, my goddess! How to turn a "good steak" into "just meat!" In desperation, I guess.


                          The solution, as has not been discussed for a few months here, is a ribbed skillet. It holds the meat above the hot surface so that the juices turning into gases can escape, just like on a grill outdoors.


                          I have a funky old cast iron one about 8" roughly square with a wooden handle. There are fancy expensive ones, but why?


                          Look on eBay.

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                          • #14
                            1



                            Get a good seasoned cast iron pan. (A Lodge one from Walmart or your local camping store is perfect).


                            Set the stove to medium high heat and put the fat of your choice in the pan (bacon grease is almost always my fat of choice).


                            Place the steak in the pan and don&#39;t touch it for 4 minutes. Flip and cook the other side for 4 minutes. Flip with a spatula, you don&#39;t want to pierce the surface. This will take a 1 1/2 inch steak to medium rare/ medium. (I actually go with high heat for 2.5 - 3 minutes because I like my steaks Pittsburgh style - seared on the outside, blue in the middle.)


                            Place the steak on a plate, cover with loose aluminum foil and go back to the pan. And this is why I pan-fry my steaks: the sauce.


                            Pour off any excess fat (if there&#39;s any still puddling in the bottom). Pour in about a cup and a half of liquid; chicken stock, beef stock, red wine, cognac (flame on!), cream, almost anything. Whisk the sauce (making sure to scrape up the &#39;burnt on&#39; bits on the bottom of the pan) until it&#39;s thick enough to coat the back of a spoon.


                            Now your steak should be well rested, so it won&#39;t spill out all its juice when you cut into it. Pour sauce on your steak and you&#39;re done.


                            If you don&#39;t want to make sauce then still rest the steak for 5 minutes. And a pat of butter on top makes a nice finisher.

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                            • #15
                              1



                              top both sides with sea salt.


                              Hot pan, i use a bit of olive oil or butter


                              cook a few mins on each side, when you flip add in some chopped onion and mushrooms, let the carmelize all around and on top of the steak. mmmmmm makes the outside crispy and sweet and keeps the inside moist. When u take it off the pan wait 10 minutes to let juices re-distribute.

                              Natural Selection: http://ichoosenaturalselection.wordpress.com

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