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Easy Fermenting Cream?

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  • Easy Fermenting Cream?

    Hi all,

    I have pasturized cream bought from the store. Can I just heat it to 110 degrees, stir in a tablespoon of storebought buttermilk or some of my hubby's storebought live culture yogurt (out of fridge or room temp?), cover with a paper towel and leave on the counter overnight? Will that do it?

    I've read a bunch of other alternatives on this site with raw cream, kefir grains, etc. but I'd like to know if my idea in particular will work as it is easiest for me, thanks tons.

  • #2
    That should work - you can try different timings to see what results come out best (but do take a note!). I leave my cream in a yoghurt maker for 36 hours to ensure that it's lactose free, too.

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    • #3
      Storebought buttermilk wouldn't work unless the cultures are live, but the yogurt should (or whey from the yogurt).

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      • #4
        Thank you both! How much yogurt do you think I would need for a pint of cream? Should the results taste slightly sour?

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        • #5
          Cream won't culture as well as milk - you're basically making creme fraiche, which will taste slightly sour, but it won't be anywhere near as tangy as yogurt or kefir. The cultures feed off the lactose, and there's nowhere near as much in cream as in milk. And, if it's ultrapasteurized, it might go weird. I would use a quarter cup of yogurt for a pint of cream - but here buttermilk has live cultures, so I usually use that when I'm making creme fraiche. It works better - check to see if you can get buttermilk with active cultures in it before you resort to yogurt.

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          • #6
            Spughy, thank you so much for your informative post, exactly what I needed to know. I will check out the buttermilk for sure now, appreciate your tips.

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            • #7
              You could always mix in some milk with your heavy cream and then add the buttermilk and yogurt. It may ruin its ability to whip if you add too much milk, though. I've added buttermilk to regular pasteurized cream before and it worked well to whip it into tangy butter. Yes, it's nowhere near as tangy as kefir, but it was definitely noticeable. And it was just Shop Rite brand buttermilk with Trader Joe's pasteurized cream.
              Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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              • #8
                Thanks for the ideas ChocoTaco, I am sticking to the heavy cream because I'm trying to avoid as much lactose as possible. What a cool idea for butter! I'm glad to hear it is not as tangy as kefir, I don't like that about kefir and would love something milder so fermented cream sounds perfect. Would you recommend a 1/4 cup of buttermilk to one pint of cream or 1/8 cup of buttermilk and 1/8 cup of yogurt? Appreciate your comments.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Goldstar View Post
                  Thanks for the ideas ChocoTaco, I am sticking to the heavy cream because I'm trying to avoid as much lactose as possible. What a cool idea for butter! I'm glad to hear it is not as tangy as kefir, I don't like that about kefir and would love something milder so fermented cream sounds perfect. Would you recommend a 1/4 cup of buttermilk to one pint of cream or 1/8 cup of buttermilk and 1/8 cup of yogurt? Appreciate your comments.
                  You kinda need lactose for what you're going for. The live cultures consume the lactose and whilst consuming, they create lactic acid as a byproduct. That is what gives you the tangier taste. After consuming, there is very little lactose left as it's mostly all been converted to lactic acid, so there's no reason to "avoid lactose" unless your goal is to "avoid flavor". If you want more flavor, put a few tablespoons of skim milk in there just to add lactose. It'll get consumed by the live cultures anyway, but it'll increase the lactic acid content and therefore flavor. It won't be like yogurt or kefir because there will be a lot more lactose in those two, but I think you'll be a little upset with how bland the cream will be. Saying you want that fermented flavor but you're trying to avoid lactose is like saying you want to drive on public roads but you're avoiding ever being in a car.
                  Last edited by ChocoTaco369; 11-18-2011, 03:53 PM.
                  Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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                  • #10
                    Oh, ChocoTaco that is very interesting! I had no idea, thanks for explaining it so well!!!

                    So, perhaps I should go with a pint of half and half, that would do it, right? If I add a 1/4 cup of my hubby's yogurt to a pint of half and half and leave it out and covered for 36 hours I'll finally have a mild tasting, low-lactose fermented cream-style drink?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Goldstar View Post
                      Oh, ChocoTaco that is very interesting! I had no idea, thanks for explaining it so well!!!

                      So, perhaps I should go with a pint of half and half, that would do it, right? If I add a 1/4 cup of my hubby's yogurt to a pint of half and half and leave it out and covered for 36 hours I'll finally have a mild tasting, low-lactose fermented cream-style drink?
                      Actually, half and half would probably be a good choice. I doubt you'll need a quarter cup of yogurt for a pint of half and half, though. I'm willing to bet a tablespoon would do it. Generally, to make yogurt, you only use 2 tablespoons of yogurt for a whole quart, so I can't see the need for more than a tablespoon.
                      Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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                      • #12
                        It might not be so much a drink as an eat-with-a-spoon stuff. I didn't realize you wanted a drink! Half-and-half would be the lowest fat percentage you could get away with, I think.

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                        • #13
                          Fermenting heavy cream with buttermilk does indeed yield creme fraiche - and that's really not nice to drink!! I just turned a litre of home-fermented creme fraiche into butter for cooking with (and eating) - very delicious - and creme fraiche is superb for thickening sauces when you're cooking, and isn't as sweet as heavy cream, but don't try to drink it!

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                          • #14
                            Oh, Man...darn it! Yes, I usually water down my heavy cream to make it drinkable like milk without the lactose. I was just looking for a way to add the benefits of fermenting it a little because I find the taste of kefir too strong. I didn't realize fermenting would thicken it, too.

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                            • #15
                              Yogurt cultures are "thermophilic" which means they require heat to work at their best. If you are leaving it at room temperature, use a buttermilk (mesophilic) culture.

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