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Keep the Fat on Meat?

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  • Keep the Fat on Meat?

    As I was preparing beef stew and dumplings for my family today, a thought occurred to me: Should the fat be cut off beef stew meat? I've always cut the fat off meat, but I think I read on one of these threads that meat fat melts when cooked. Is that true?
    I'm retraining and strengthening my taste buds, one primal meal at a time.

  • #2
    Some will say to cut it off conventional (not grassfed) meat because of O6. I leave it on, unless it is such a fatty, gristly piece that I can't eat it pleasantly.

    As to your question - yes, some of the fat will render off but in my experience with beef/steak etc much of the fat stays on the meat.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by canio6 View Post
      Some will say to cut it off conventional (not grassfed) meat because of O6. I leave it on, unless it is such a fatty, gristly piece that I can't eat it pleasantly.

      As to your question - yes, some of the fat will render off but in my experience with beef/steak etc much of the fat stays on the meat.
      this
      Georgette

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      • #4
        I didn't even think about the toxins in fat, thanks for pointing that out. I still buy quite a bit of conventional meat. I try to get grassfed whenever the budget allows, but it's not as often as I'd like. So trimming the fat it is!
        I'm retraining and strengthening my taste buds, one primal meal at a time.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by canio6 View Post
          Some will say to cut it off conventional (not grassfed) meat because of O6.
          The PUFA content is still low relative to SFA and MUFA.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by js290 View Post
            The PUFA content is still low relative to SFA and MUFA.
            Agreed, which is why I said, 'some will say', and why I do not cut it off myself. I just wanted to give both sides

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            • #7
              In a long slow cooking process, a lot of the fat will render out of the meat, leaving a nice sheen to your stew. Depending on the cut of meat and what I'm doing with it, I'll trim the fat, but more often I leave it on and trim it after.
              "Thanks to the combination of meat, calcium-rich leaf foods, and a vigorous life, the early hunter-gatherers were robust, with strong skeletons, jaws, and teeth." - Harold McGee, On Food And Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

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              • #8
                Slow cooked lean meat is not as nice as slow cooked fatty meat. Better still with bones. I think the toxins in fat issue is over played. Certainly the O6 content is nowhere near as bad as it made out. Indeed the O6 content of grain fed beef is very similar to that of grass fed beef. It is the O3 content that is different. But even then the O3 content of all beef is insignificant (brains excepted)
                Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

                Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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                • #9
                  How do you make primal dumplings? Can you post the recipe?

                  Fat - eat it!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by peril View Post
                    Slow cooked lean meat is not as nice as slow cooked fatty meat. Better still with bones. I think the toxins in fat issue is over played. Certainly the O6 content is nowhere near as bad as it made out. Indeed the O6 content of grain fed beef is very similar to that of grass fed beef. It is the O3 content that is different. But even then the O3 content of all beef is insignificant (brains excepted)
                    Well, this is interesting. Now you've got my curiosity raised.
                    I'm retraining and strengthening my taste buds, one primal meal at a time.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by breadsauce View Post
                      How do you make primal dumplings? Can you post the recipe?

                      Fat - eat it!
                      Sorry, the dumplings aren't primal. They're just Bisquick mixed with milk. I thought about trying to make them primal, but my husband likes the dumplings as-is. I did see gluten-free Bisquick at the store, but it's twice the price and half the size.
                      I'm retraining and strengthening my taste buds, one primal meal at a time.

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                      • #12
                        I cut most of the fat off my meat. Why? I prefer the taste of leaner meat, first off. Fat isn't flavorful at all - fat absorbs flavor, so that argument doesn't work on me. I cut off the fat and render it into cooking oil if there's a lot of it. Honestly, I don't need the extra calories and it doesn't add anything to the taste, so off it goes. I prefer leaner meats pan seared in oil.
                        Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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