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Bone Broth in Pressure Cooker

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  • #16
    Pressure cooker all the way. I've been doing it for the last year and I've noticed that cutting the chicken bones in half help get a lot of the marrow out when cooking. I usually let them cook at high pressure (15PSI) for about 1.5-2 hours. Bones come out very hollow. Can always reuse for a less gelly broth as well. I also have an All American 921 which makes A LOT of broth at once. Last run was 4 chicken carcasses, 3lb beef stock bones, 3 onions, 2 celery stocks, 1lb carrots, few bay leaves, bunch of peppercorns, and some oregano. Yumo!

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    • #17
      Pressure cooker bone broth is my new staple. Good in everything, or just by itself. I think it supplies nutrients that can help repair connective tissues and cartilage.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by windypasswheeler View Post
        Pressure cooker bone broth is my new staple. Good in everything, or just by itself. I think it supplies nutrients that can help repair connective tissues and cartilage.
        Agree. It FEELS healing! As well as being delicious. Today in my pressure cooker goes a carcass from roast pheasant, two chicken carcass from the freezer and the bones from 4 sets of pork ribs. Should be interesting - BBQ sauce flavoured gamey stock!

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        • #19
          I've been making bone broth/stock for years but get fed up with the 24 hour cooking time and lamb bone smell permeating the house.

          So I've got one of these bad boys arriving tomorrow Kuhn Rikon Duromatic Inox Pressure Cooker With Side Grips (22cm), 6.0 Litre: Amazon.co.uk: Kitchen & Home

          Also found this, quite a frustrating read! Bone and vegetable broth
          As judged by chemical standards, bone and vegetable broths are not of great nutritional value. Their protein is mainly gelatin, and they contain only small amounts of starch and sugar.

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          • #20
            I use my pressure cooker to make bone broth. Upside - it doesn't take 24 hours, so the house doesn't smell like cooking bones for a whole day. Downside - unless you get an electric one with automatic shut off, you have to be near it for a few hours.

            How I do it:

            All the bones into the strainer part of the pressure cooker. Two tablespoons of unfiltered apple cider vinegar. (It's an 8 quart pressure cooker). I don't add salt until I eat it.

            I use the largest knuckle bone as a guide. So, fill to Max line, cook at pressure for an hour. Depressurize and check. It's never done at this point, so fill with filtered water back up to the Max line. Cook for another hour at pressure. It's rarely done at this point. Fill to Max line (last time). Cook at pressure for about 40-45 minutes. Depressurize and check. There shouldn't be any gelatinous substance on the largest knuckle bone at all, and some of the smaller bones may be splitting. It's done. It becomes pure wiggly goodness when it cools/is refrigerated.

            Remove strainer with bones; let broth cool. Ladle it into jars or ice cube trays. Put in freezer and/or fridge. Be happy. I add salt when I eat it, and also often add a half sheet of nori torn or cut into small pieces.

            I don't know what nutritionists say about bone broth, but I always get a jolt of energy and my face gets warm when I eat it, so it must be doing something.
            "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

            B*tch-lite

            Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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            • #21
              What's the smallest amount of water you can get away with? I made the mistake of filling mine to max water level and now I have to reduce it down...so the house stinks as it usually would! Doh!

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              • #22
                I've been using my pressure cooker for bone broth since early Jan, its the best ever, rally easy and makes making broth daily an easy task. One can even make a roast (like crockpot roast) and then crisp it in the oven after. Now I can put away my slow cooker, its taking a lot of space on the counter !!

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                • #23
                  Chronyx: The instructions for mine says never fill it more than two thirds, the minimum is for me is a third, I always ensure the meat/bones are covered with water and its at least a third full, but mostly I half fill it to have more broth.

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                  • #24
                    I've always used my pressure cooker to make broth. I use beef knuckles and it's hit or miss whether I get a lot of gelatin in the broth. I was curious to see whether the crock pot would produce a better broth over 48 hours. From what I've read the pressure cooker reduces cooking time by about 66%; therefore one hour in the pressure cooker would be the equivalent of three hours in a pot. I know that many people cook bones for 48-72 hours to maximize the nutrients, so I thought I'd try to crock pot for once. The smell is pretty bad. I love broth but bones STINK when they are cooking. I'm gone for most of the day but I feel bad for my roommate who has been home inhaling the bone vapors for the last day.
                    Love, peace, and bacon grease.

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                    • #25
                      I can't see that primal man waited 48 or even 24 hours for his broth!

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                      • #26
                        Nom Nom Paleo has a post on pressure cooking bone broth

                        I just fill mine with bones, top it off with water and cook on high for an hour with a little vinegar. Then I pour off the broth, mash the bones (if there are soft ones like chicken bones or pork ribs), add enough water to cover by an inch or less and cook for another hour.
                        Cooking Primal with Otter - Journal
                        Otter's (Defunct) Primal Log
                        "Not baked goods, Professor, baked bads!" ~ The Tick

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                        • #27
                          Primal man didn't wait

                          Originally posted by Hotmail View Post
                          I can't see that primal man waited 48 or even 24 hours for his broth!
                          Primal man didn't usually wait. Before fire and clay pots he probably just gnawed on bones a lot. I've seen my great grandparents, older uncles, etc. all gnawing on bones. One of them use to have the butcher saw them for him so he could get his jaw around them! After the advent of fire it was probably pretty much a continuous brew of various bones, meat scraps, etc. Even current primitive native populations do this. But nothing went to waste.
                          ================
                          Is your cave located in Minnesota? Join the "Paleo Friends - Minnesota" group on Facebook. We can always use Paleo friendly restaurant finds and tips.

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                          • #28
                            I cook beef and pork bones in the pressure cooker for a minimum of 4 hours, and they really probably should go 5 or 6. Chicken and turkey bones can go 3-4 hours. I don't put any vegetables in until the last hour or they completely break down and cloud the broth. Often I don't even do vegetables in it. A pressure cooker is definitely the way to do broth.
                            ================
                            Is your cave located in Minnesota? Join the "Paleo Friends - Minnesota" group on Facebook. We can always use Paleo friendly restaurant finds and tips.

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                            • #29
                              I've always read it was 1:4, so four hours in the oven is equal to 1 hour in the pressure cooker. But remember this is the oven, not the slow cooker. Its more like 1:6 or up to 1:12 comparing a pressure cooker to a slow cooker.
                              ================
                              Is your cave located in Minnesota? Join the "Paleo Friends - Minnesota" group on Facebook. We can always use Paleo friendly restaurant finds and tips.

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                              • #30
                                We bought the Instant Pot and it's too good to be true. We can stuff it with bones, almost top it off with water, plop a splash of vinegar (we use kombucha vinegar because it happens) and in 45 minutes - POW, large amounts of stock ready, gelatinous and done.
                                Crohn's, doing SCD

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