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  • Pot Roast Gravy?

    Looking for some help in making a slow cooker pot roast that produces a thick yummy gravy.

    I'm slow cooking one right now and the juices are just so watery.
    Any suggestions on what I could do to thicken it up and give it a more creamy texture?
    DD born August 2012
    TTC #2
    SW: 1/20/14- 212.4
    CW: 2/21/14- 202.6 (9.8 loss)
    Goal: Short term, get below 200 and get pregnant. Long term, get to 120-130
    Mini goal, get in to a size 12.

    My boring uneventful journal for your viewing pleasure

  • #2
    I know of two methods:

    Reduce the juices (heat until a lot of the water evaporates) and then add a few pats of butter.

    Add a "primal starch" thickener such as potato starch, arrowroot, or tapioca flour, if you're not averse to a little bit of additional starch. I haven't used any of these in making a gravy, so I don't know how well they work. It might be a good idea to temper them instead of just dumping straight into the gravy.

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    • #3
      Thanks for the suggestions.
      I have some arrowroot powder. Not sure if it's ok to add some now, or wait until it's done and then make the gravy on the stove.
      I'll just wait probably heh.
      DD born August 2012
      TTC #2
      SW: 1/20/14- 212.4
      CW: 2/21/14- 202.6 (9.8 loss)
      Goal: Short term, get below 200 and get pregnant. Long term, get to 120-130
      Mini goal, get in to a size 12.

      My boring uneventful journal for your viewing pleasure

      Comment


      • #4
        I'll second reduction, with an additional note: once the stock is reduced and still simmering, quickly stir in cold butter (it thickens the liquid and makes it darn tasty).
        Started PB late 2008, lost 50 lbs by late 2009. Have been plateaued, but that thing may just be biting the dust: more on that later.

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        • #5
          Don't use coconut flour. Tried it once, YUCK.

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          • #6
            I don't cook with slow cookers, but they won't reduce liquids substantially enough to thicken. You'll need to take the liquids and thicken on the stovetop. You can use thickeners like arrowroot, but I would suggest kicking it up to high until it's just ready to boil, then reducing to a simmer until thick, and as mentioned, hitting it with some butter at the end. If you have some extra time, reduce the liquid, add a generous splash of red wine, reduce again, and then add butter to finish. That will make the sauce really rich.

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            • #7
              I have tried 5 times to reduce a sauce and it doesn't seem to work. How do you do it?
              Georgette

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              • #8
                Originally posted by geostump View Post
                I have tried 5 times to reduce a sauce and it doesn't seem to work. How do you do it?
                A sauce from pan drippings or cooked meat should contain moisture that will evaporate at a medium heat (around a simmer). You don't want to boil and possibly burn the sauce, but a slow, steady cooking should reduce and thicken the sauce substantially. Hard to say how long without knowing what the volume is, but if you have a LOT of sauce, don't use a deep pan, use a wide one to maximize evaporation. Usually you can thicken a sauce by half in 15-20 minutes.

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                • #9
                  Tomato paste works if you don't mind a tomato-ey sauce. Sour cream works too, like this recipe: Kalyn's Kitchen: Crockpot Recipe for Hungarian Pot Roast with Sour Cream and Paprika Gravy

                  Next time, though, I'd add much less liquid to the pot.
                  My food blog ~ http://stuffimakemyhusband.blogspot.com
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                  • #10
                    Really great suggestions everyone! Thanks so much!
                    Going to try my hand at reducing first and see how that goes. Love the sound of putting butter in at the end. MMMMM lol
                    DD born August 2012
                    TTC #2
                    SW: 1/20/14- 212.4
                    CW: 2/21/14- 202.6 (9.8 loss)
                    Goal: Short term, get below 200 and get pregnant. Long term, get to 120-130
                    Mini goal, get in to a size 12.

                    My boring uneventful journal for your viewing pleasure

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by erica057 View Post
                      Tomato paste works if you don't mind a tomato-ey sauce. Sour cream works too, like this recipe: Kalyn's Kitchen: Crockpot Recipe for Hungarian Pot Roast with Sour Cream and Paprika Gravy

                      Next time, though, I'd add much less liquid to the pot.
                      I'll have to try that recipe. Looks tasty!
                      DD born August 2012
                      TTC #2
                      SW: 1/20/14- 212.4
                      CW: 2/21/14- 202.6 (9.8 loss)
                      Goal: Short term, get below 200 and get pregnant. Long term, get to 120-130
                      Mini goal, get in to a size 12.

                      My boring uneventful journal for your viewing pleasure

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Gravy is made by pouring water onto a roasting pan that has held a good meat joint and scraping up the scorched solids into a liquid.

                        You can make up a thick gravy from bone marrow - oxtail is a good start. Bake them in an oven at a high heat to colour and darken and then chuck the pieces into a crock pot and cover with water ... slow cook ... the result? Gravy! You can freeze it. It will be gelatinous and thick.

                        Make up a pouring gravy by combining your stock with water in a frying pan - heat up, drop the heat and whisk in butter. No real need for arrowroot, but if you want to thicken crock pot stew juices, arrowroot is fantastic! Take off the stew, leaving the juice and then heat up with a good heaped teaspoon of arrowroot in water. Pour into the juices and they'll thicken. Whisk in a little butter for a glossy jus.

                        These are the "classic" methods.
                        Paul
                        http://www.pjgh.co.uk
                        http://www.livingintheiceage.co.uk

                        "... needs more fish!"

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                        • #13
                          I don't generally cook roast in a slow cooker but I don't see why this won't work. I braise with root vegetables (carrots, onions, parsnips), then pour off the drippings, separate out much of the fat, add the liquid and vegetables to the food processor and puree. He consistency is gravy like enough for me.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Antmuzic View Post
                            I don't generally cook roast in a slow cooker but I don't see why this won't work. I braise with root vegetables (carrots, onions, parsnips), then pour off the drippings, separate out much of the fat, add the liquid and vegetables to the food processor and puree. He consistency is gravy like enough for me.
                            Veges as thickener: I like it.
                            Started PB late 2008, lost 50 lbs by late 2009. Have been plateaued, but that thing may just be biting the dust: more on that later.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by geostump View Post
                              I have tried 5 times to reduce a sauce and it doesn't seem to work. How do you do it?
                              I put the juices in a big saute pan and turn the heat high, to get it reduced in a hurry, a drop (2-4T) of sherry adds flavor, then when it is reduced by half or more, add a 2-3T of butter which smooths it our and adds sheen.
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