Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Flour alternatives

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Flour alternatives

    Aside from coconut,what are some other options.

    How "coconutty" does the coconut flour taste anyway?

  • #2
    The coconut flour I use has a very slight coconutty taste and I usually only taste it if it's in a baked good of some sort and not when used as a breading for cooking meat. I do not like fresh coconut whatsoever, but I think it's more the texture than anything. I also use almond flour sparingly. I've been told that different brands of coconut flour have stronger or weaker coconut flavor. Mine comes from nutsonline.com.
    Last edited by kiss; 07-14-2011, 01:59 PM.
    kiss = keep it simple, sister!

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks

      Comment


      • #4
        Various nuts can be ground into flours but I mainly stick with almond meal. Easier to get, cheaper when bought in bulk, and I only use blanched nuts. I do add flax seed meal to bread when I make loafs as it gives it a bit more of a "bready" taste. If you're looking for something to use for breading try pork rinds blitzed in the food processor. I don't do it all that often but it makes a delicious coating for chicken, fish or frog legs.
        Buy house, Demolish house, Build house.

        Comment


        • #5
          The coconut flour we have is less like flour or coconut and more like insipid sand. I utterly detest is so far, and have been put off pancakes by the coconut pancake recipe in the pb cookbook.

          I've been using almond, and flax meals. I do have buckwheat flour, but haven't seen what opinions are on its fitness for being a flour alternative for those of us trying to lose weight. It IS a seed afterall. (It is also the classic flour for crepes.)
          My Fitday public journal.
          Me vs. Russian Boar, hunt is on Aug. 20th. WHAT'S MORE PRIMAL THAN THAT?!
          Recently survived Warrior Dash, New England.
          Game Developer, ex-Chef, long time Fatbody.

          Comment


          • #6
            coconut flour is my least favorite flour to work with. I use flaxmeal the majority of the time when a recipe calls for it, and supplement with almond meal (which tends to be pricey, so i try to use as much flaxmeal as possible).

            coconut flour tends to be very soft beach sandish, crumbles easily when cooked, and really dense.
            --Trish (Bork)
            TROPICAL TRADITIONS REFERRAL # 7625207
            http://pregnantdiabetic.blogspot.com
            FOOD PORN BLOG! http://theprimaljunkfoodie.blogspot.com

            Comment


            • #7
              I forgot about pork rinds.

              Comment


              • #8
                If you're OK using protein powder, you can make a nice loaf out of that too. You can grind chia into a flour as well, but I doubt you could use it on its own.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm a fan of almond flour/almond meal -- you can read online how to make your own too if you don't want to buy it (can be expensive at the store). Coconut flour isn't that pronounced of a taste. I was surprised when I made muffins with it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    OP, what are you looking to make? Make sure you look up recipes with alternate flours online because you can't just sub an equal amount of nut flour for regular flour in most things.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I use coconut, and have actually had success. Its not perfect, but it works well for me. I also use white rice flour and tapioca flour occasionally.

                      I will *not* however use almond flour. Too many oxidized pufas. Not healthy at all. Its better than flax meal though, which I completely 100% avoid and will never use. phytoestrogens and oxidized O3 and O6? No thanks.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I usually use almond, coconut and or flax. Flax has the advantage of being a binding agent, which neither almond or coconut are.
                        I blog :http://raisinggodzillas.blogspot.com/
                        Like me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/...17134571662261
                        "We have all the food groups- meat and chocolate".

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Also, I have found in grainless baked goods, try to avoid the fats called for and use coconut milk instead. The fats have a tendency to pool at the bottom.
                          I blog :http://raisinggodzillas.blogspot.com/
                          Like me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/...17134571662261
                          "We have all the food groups- meat and chocolate".

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Lately I've been using buckwheat flour for making pancake batter. I cook a serving and keep the rest in the fridge where it will keep for a couple of days. Nice to have freshly made pikelets (small pancakes) with my bacon and eggs.

                            I use this recipe: Gluten Free Buckwheat Pancakes Recipe | Wrightfood

                            I find you don't need to whisk the egg whites. Just chuck in the egg and mix well.
                            My website: http://www.shoppinganywhere.net/

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The type of flour to use REALLY depends on what you're making. I've used mostly coconut and almond meal (they work really well combined!) but I'm just getting into tapioca starch, and I love it.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X