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Pioneer sauerkraut recipe

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  • Pioneer sauerkraut recipe

    Has anyone else made pioneer sauerkraut? The kind where you put shredded cabbage, a pinch of salt, and just enough water to cover in a jar and leave it alone for a few days?

    If you have, how do you know when its ready to eat? I've read different websites that say the mixture will bubble, mine hasn't so I'm not sure if I've done it right.
    See what I'm up to: The Primal Gardener

  • #2
    Dip in your finger and taste the liquid. I've only just started and its winter here but mine has been ready to eat within a week
    Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

    Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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    • #3
      I've only had store-bought stuff and that was a while ago-what should it taste like? I put it on top of the fridge where it's always warm and its been about two weeks.
      See what I'm up to: The Primal Gardener

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      • #4
        Rivven made saurkraut...
        Fighting fibromyalgia and chronic myofascial pain since 2002.

        Big Fat Fiasco

        Our bodies crave real food. We remain hungry as long as we refuse to eat real food, no matter how much junk we stuff into our stomachs. ~J. Stanton

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        • #5
          I make big batches of sauerkraut that way. You just need to taste it. I usually wait a few weeks then if it tastes good I scoop out a jar full that I keep in the fridge for easy pickens and leave the rest in the "Kraut" pot till we run out of the stuff in the fridge. After the first week I put the large kraut pot in the basement where it is at pretty constant temp. I am sure it will work wherever you keep it though. Glad you reminded me. I need to go get another jar full out.
          Let us know what you think when you taste it.

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          • #6
            Elaine- I'm still chuckling from Rivvin's sauerkraut adventure. I didn't have the guts to make that much at one go though, LOL!!! I threw together three pints. Its been so long since we've had it no one can remember if they liked it or not and I figured that was enough for everyone to get a taste.
            See what I'm up to: The Primal Gardener

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            • #7
              LOL Rivven will forever be my hero just for admitting that entire story publicly!

              I don't know that I've ever had sauerkraut, sounds a bit silly but I can't recall ever trying it. So, I don't know whether to make some a la primal forums, or buy some. If I make some, I wouldn't know if it was good, bad or toxic! Well... I gather I might find out if its toxic...
              Fighting fibromyalgia and chronic myofascial pain since 2002.

              Big Fat Fiasco

              Our bodies crave real food. We remain hungry as long as we refuse to eat real food, no matter how much junk we stuff into our stomachs. ~J. Stanton

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              • #8
                I am clueless about fermenting foods. If you heat the sauerkraut it loses its good properties, right? So cooking with it seems to be out...like on top of a roast in crock pot. What about the sauerkraut in jars at the grocery. Has it been cooked? I remember trying some when I was much younger and spitting it out, but I am ready to give it a try. I just don't want to make a big batch yet. Where to buy?

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                • #9
                  my local Whole Foods sells little bags of it in the meat area, in the front of the cases where they put the hot dogs & commercial sausages & german brats. I forget the brand, but it's a green colored bag & i think it tastes pretty good.

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                  • #10
                    If I like horse radish, and I like coleslaw, what are the odds of me liking sauerkraut? I don't really want to buy some if the store bought stuff tastes icky compared to home made, but I don't know if I want to dive into home made without knowing if I like it :P catch 22!
                    Fighting fibromyalgia and chronic myofascial pain since 2002.

                    Big Fat Fiasco

                    Our bodies crave real food. We remain hungry as long as we refuse to eat real food, no matter how much junk we stuff into our stomachs. ~J. Stanton

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ElaineC View Post
                      If I like horse radish, and I like coleslaw, what are the odds of me liking sauerkraut? I don't really want to buy some if the store bought stuff tastes icky compared to home made, but I don't know if I want to dive into home made without knowing if I like it :P catch 22!
                      I think that sauerkraut tastes nothing like coleslaw or horseradish, lol. However, a jar of the grocery store kind (that has been pasteurized so it won't provide the probiotics) is SUPER cheap. At mine it's like maybe $2 for the jar? I'd say it's worth trying.

                      It's pretty sour/tangy and my husband and I find it delicious. It's also good heated with some bacon fat, or sometimes when I heat it up I put chopped apple into it (for sweet/sour combo). Yummy!!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by nancy64 View Post
                        If you heat the sauerkraut it loses its good properties, right?

                        I was wondering this as well. Do you have to eat it cold? I've always heated it in a skillet, but I just bought my first batch of raw, so I don't want to kill the probiotics I just paid for, haha.

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                        • #13
                          I use the Nourishing Traditions recipe, which calls for a lot more salt than the original poster's recipe: 2 tablespoons per head of cabbage if you don't have any whey to use as a starter. The first time I made it this spring it took me 3 weeks to get it fermented. I had to add extra salt water to keep it covered. And it was really salty; I had to rinse it whenever I ate some. This week I used some of the leftover juice that already has the bacteria in it, and therefore could use less salt. It only took three days to ferment and it's much less salty. I eat it as a salad with some sliced tomatoes.

                          Frankly, I don't like it as much as commercial pasteurized sauerkraut, which has a more vinegar-y taste that I love. But I'm getting used to eating the proper stuff and really want to get all that good live bacteria!

                          Today I'm going to try making Nourishing Traditions lacto-fermented ginger carrots. I'll let you know how it goes.
                          Il faut vivre et non pas seulement exister.

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                          • #14
                            I once made it, but I've never had store-bought sauerkraut, so I had no idea what it should ideally taste like
                            Found myself not liking it particularly much, so I haven't made it since.

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                            • #15
                              I have made it a few times. I highly recommend the book "wild ferment". I got it from the library and found many great recipes and good descriptions of why/how things work in there.
                              Using low lectin/nightshade free primal to control autoimmune arthritis. (And lost 50 lbs along the way )

                              http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html

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