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  • Parsnips & Turnips

    I'm making soup and I was thinking of using parsnips & turnips in it. I've never used either of those before and was wondering if the flavors of both would be ok in a soup?
    Georgette

  • #2
    Ya, they should be good.

    I have put them both in a regular stew type soup and also made chowder with them.
    ~Blog~

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    • #3
      I sometimes put parnips in my chicken soup. They look like white carrots and taste kinda sweet. I like 'em. The family probably mostly puts up with it though!

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      • #4
        I use both often. Curried parsnip soup is divine (if you like curry flavours....). And turnip, parsnip, with carrot make a really good root veg soup. If it tastes too sweet for you - add the juice of a lemon.

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        • #5
          Parsnips can have a kind of woody/early flavour, not dissimilar to celeriac but more on the front of the tongue. Turnips are quite bland. I'd go for larger pieces of turnip and smaller (1cm square) pieces of parsnip in a stew/soup. Parsnip chips are nice ... fry 'em in dripping.

          Chuck 'em in and see how you like them. You'll get the hang of it.
          Paul
          http://www.pjgh.co.uk
          http://www.livingintheiceage.co.uk

          "... needs more fish!"

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          • #6
            Parsnips are a standard soup-mix vegetable here
            Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

            Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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            • #7
              Both veggies hold up well to long hours in the slow cooker.

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              • #8
                I tossed parsnips in my last pot roast (8-10 hour cooking time) and they were horrible. I love parsnips but they didn't get tender enough and were too woody and stringy. I wish you more success than I had.

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                • #9
                  I'm not a big fan of turnips and I can almost always taste them-even in soups and stews. They give a weird tang (can't describe it better, sorry). Hubby loves them and says they are perfect potato substitutes so *shrug*

                  Good luck cooking!
                  See what I'm up to: The Primal Gardener

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                  • #10
                    Turnips work fine in most situations, but be aware that the taste of parsnip is very pervasive; adding them to just about anything will turn it into Parsnip _____ because you can always taste the parsnip (which is fine so long as you like parsnip).

                    I tossed parsnips in my last pot roast (8-10 hour cooking time) and they were horrible. I love parsnips but they didn't get tender enough and were too woody and stringy. I wish you more success than I had.
                    Uh, did they dry out? Because parsnip starts out with a carrot-like texture and cooks just like a carrot as well, but you have to be careful roasting them because they do dry out.
                    Last edited by jhc; 06-19-2011, 07:35 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by jhc View Post
                      Turnips work fine in most situations, but be aware that the taste of parsnip is very pervasive; adding them to just about anything will turn it into Parsnip _____ because you can always taste the parsnip (which is fine so long as you like parsnip).



                      Uh, did they dry out? Because parsnip starts out with a carrot-like texture and cooks just like a carrot as well, but you have to be careful roasting them because they do dry out.
                      If they are too big / old, the middle of a parsnip is very woody and they just don't cook down to tender. Best to quarter the big boys length ways and chop out the bit that is really hard. Or - better still - just buy small ones!

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                      • #12
                        Chop turnips up real small, add to any longer-cooked dish like soup or stew where you want a natural sweetness. If you cook them long enough, they disintegrate, just leaving the sweet.

                        I used them last night in a veg curry side dish: chopped cauliflower, zucchini, turnip, carrot and onion. Saute in butter until onions are tender. Add homemade chicken stock about an inch up the pot, cook until vegs are tender. Add coconut milk, curry spice mix, turmeric, cayenne, coriander seeds, cardamom powder, salt. Cover and cook on medium low heat until vegs are soft or however you like them.
                        Positively Radical Pigeonholes are for Pigeons!

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                        • #13
                          Both are great soup veggies, in my book. I like parsnips cut up and roasted on a cookie sheet, but you need to get them out while they are still nice and moist inside. You just want to brown the outside and cook the inside. They would just be sweet shoe leather if let dry out.

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